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The Handbook of Student Affairs Administration, 2nd Edition,9780787947200
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The Handbook of Student Affairs Administration, 2nd Edition

by ;
ISBN13:

9780787947200

ISBN10:
0787947202
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
3/1/2000
Publisher(s):
Jossey-Bass
List Price: $75.00
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  • The Handbook of Student Affairs Administration (Sponsored by NASPA, Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education)
    The Handbook of Student Affairs Administration (Sponsored by NASPA, Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education)




Summary

Sponsored by the National Association of Student Personnel AdministratorsWhat issues and trends affect higher education and student affairs today? What skills and competencies will student affairs administrators need to confront change and future challenges? What opportunities and choices will they discover as they strive to develop professionally? In this fully updated handbook, thirty-nine experts discuss the answers to these and other essential questions. Together, they provide a definitive reference for student affairs professionals at all levels of administration and management.Organized into five distinct sections and over thirty insightful chapters, The Handbook of Student Affairs Administration offers specific, practical advice as well as broad approaches to planning and problem solving. Readers will find modernized discussions on such critical topics as institutional mission, strategic planning, change management, finance and budgeting, staff selection, training and evaluation, conflict resolution, fundraising, legal and ethical behavior, service development, technological innovation, diversity, leadership, and more.In addition, there are new chapters that explore: The history and philosophy of student affairs How to plan and finance campus facilities The role and value of assessment in student affairs How to translate theory and assessment results into practice How to create successful partnerships with academic affairs The impact of fundraising and development The standards and principles of good professional practiceFilled with thoughtful advice from the field's foremost authorities, this comprehensive handbook reflects the most current and effective practices in college student affairs.Praise for the Classic First Edition"Each chapter is designed to stand alone as a source of information for new chief student affairs officers, individuals new to the student affairs field, doctoral students, chief student affairs officers seeking professional renewal, college presidents, and other administrative officers who want to know more about student affairs work.... Many of the chapters in this handbook are filled with 'ah hahs,' quiet smiles, and those private revelations that people have when reading an insightful statement they wish they themselves had made.... As is true for most of the Jossey-Bass professional handbooks, each chapter stands alone and offers varying degrees of information and usefulness."--Journal of Higher Education"The authors address the critical issues and skills necessary for higher education administration. The book covers a wide range of topics that would be appropriate for the beginning administrator as well as the seasoned veteran. The essays provide information on the practical day-to-day activities of higher education administration as well as the more abstract concepts of strategic decision-making and the political realities that surround university life. The book is recommAnded; it has such a broad brush approach that it is practical for an introductory course in higher education as well as a solid reference for the practicing administrator."--Choice

Author Biography

MARGARET J. BARR is vice president for student affairs at Northwestern University. MARY K. DESLER is assistant vice president for student affairs at Northwestern University.

Table of Contents

National Association of Student Personnel Administrators xix
Preface xxi
Acknowledgements xxv
The Authors xxvii
PART ONE: THE ADMINISTRATIVE ENVIRONMENT OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 1(118)
The History and Philosophy of Student Affairs
3(22)
James J. Rhatigan
Beginnings
5(8)
Values in Historical Perspective
13(12)
The Importance of the Institutional Mission
25(12)
Margaret J. Barr
Why is a Mission Statement Important?
26(1)
Factors Influencing the Mission
27(6)
Predetermination
33(1)
Suggestions for Professionals
34(1)
Summary
35(2)
Institutional Governance and the Role of Student Affairs
37(13)
Thomas E. Miller
Contextual Parameters
38(10)
Summary
48(2)
Understanding Campus Environments
50(23)
George D. Kuh
The Importance of the Institutional Context on Student Learning and Personal Development
51(1)
A Framework for Assessing the Influence of Contextual Conditions on Student Learning
52(10)
Key Issues in Assessing Environmental Influences on Learning
62(6)
Summary
68(5)
Fiscal Pressures on Higher Education and Student Affairs
73(24)
John H. Schuh
Demographic and Social Trends
74(5)
Federal Higher Education Initiatives Issues Related to State Finance
79(6)
Selected Factors Influencing the Financial Health of Institutions
85(1)
Student Costs
86(6)
Summary
92(5)
Identifying and Working with Key Constituents
97(22)
Dudley B. Woodard, Jr.
Mark von Destinon
Theoretical Frameworks
98(5)
Constituent Groups
103(5)
Interpretation
108(3)
Working Guidelines and Advice
111(4)
Summary
115(4)
PART TWO: ORGANIZATIONAL AND MANAGEMENT ISSUES 119(110)
Organizational and Administrative Models
121(14)
David A. Ambler
Organizational Models in Higher Education
122(1)
The Rational Model
122(1)
The Bureaucratic Model
123(1)
The Collegial Model
123(1)
The Political Model
123(1)
Models for Administrative Oversight of Student Affairs
124(1)
Reporting to the Chief Executive Officer
124(1)
Reporting through Another Institutional Officer
125(1)
The Dual Reporting Responsibility
125(1)
The Decentralized Organizational Structure
126(4)
Models of Internal Management Structures for Student Affairs
130(3)
Summary
133(2)
The Role of the Middle Manager
135(19)
Donald B. Mills
Defining Middle Management in Student Affairs
135
Role Issues for Middle Management
40(105)
Relationships with the Supervisor
145(2)
Middle Manager as Politician
147(1)
Mobility
148(3)
Summary
151(3)
Selecting, Training, Supervising, and Evaluating Staff
154(24)
Saundra L. Taylor
Mark von Destinon
Organizational Climate and Culture
155(1)
Human Behavior within Organizations
156(1)
Organizational Culture and Leadership
157(3)
Multicultrual Awareness
160(1)
Employee Selection
160(2)
Human Relations and Technology
162(1)
Staff Hierarchy
163(3)
Employee Turnover
166(1)
Career Advancement
167(1)
Performance Appraisal
168(1)
Behavioral Evaluation
169(2)
Legal Issues
171(1)
Guidelines
172(2)
Summary
174(4)
The Political Dimensions of Decision Making
178(19)
Paul L. Moore
Basic Concepts
179(1)
Important Conceptual Considerations
180(2)
Needs, Motivation, and Expectations
182(1)
Self-Serving Versus Productive Behavior
183(1)
Leadership
183(1)
Important Elements of Institutions of Higher Education
183(3)
Perspectives and Strategies
186(5)
Staff Education
191(1)
Faculty
192(1)
Communication
193(1)
Ethical Considerations
193(1)
Special Considerations
194(1)
Summary
195(1)
References
195(2)
Planning, Managing, and Financing Facilities and Services
197(19)
George S. McClellan
Margaret J. Barr
Central Issues in Facility Management
198(9)
Issues in Renovation and Construction of Facilities
207(4)
Shared Fiscal and Operational Responsibility
211(1)
Change and Facilities Management
211(2)
Recommendations for Practice
213(3)
Technological Changes in Student Affairs Administration
216(13)
M. Lee Upcraft
Harold Goldsmith
Technology, Society, and Higher Education
217(10)
Conclusion
227(2)
PART THREE: ESSENTIAL SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS MANAGERS 229(246)
An Overview of Relevant Theories and Models for Student Affairs Practice
231(18)
Kelly A. Carter
George S. McClellan
Issues Involved
232(1)
Useful Models
233(1)
Useful Theories
234(10)
Suggestions for Practice
244(5)
Assessment in Student Affairs
249(16)
M. Lee Upcraft
John H. Schuh
Some Basic Definitions
249(2)
Why Assessment in Student Affairs?
251(4)
A Comprehensive Assessment Model
255(2)
Steps in the Assessment Process
257(5)
The Ethics of Assessment
262(1)
Overcoming Resistance to Assessment
262(2)
Summary
264(1)
Measuring Student Satisfaction and Needs
265(20)
John H. Schuh
M. Lee Upcraft
The Role of Institutional Mission in Needs and Satisfaction Assessment
267(1)
Definitions
268(2)
Building the Case for Needs and Satisfaction Assessment
270(9)
Static Assessment Measures
279(3)
Summary
282(3)
Translating Theory and Assessment Results to Practice
285(26)
Mary K. Desler
Definition of Terms
286(1)
Theory Related to Student Affairs
287(1)
Research About Students and How They Learn
288(2)
Assessment Methods
290(7)
Translating Theory, Research, and Assessment Results to Practice
297(4)
A Case Study
301(6)
Issues in Translating Theory and Assessments Results to Practice
307(4)
Program Planning and Implementation
311(16)
Joan Claar
Michael Cuyjet
The Model
312(1)
Planning and Implementing Major Initiatives
312(6)
Planning and Implementing Specific Activites
318(7)
Recommendations for Practice
325(2)
Budgeting and Fiscal Management
327(20)
Dudley B. Woodard, Jr.
Mark von Destinon
Financial Context for Budgeting
328(1)
Politics and Policy
329(1)
Budget Definitions
330(2)
Budget Models
332(4)
Student Affairs Budget Cycle
336(3)
Budget Guidelines
339(2)
Savings Should Be Real
341(1)
Partnership with Faculty Must Be Genuine
341(1)
Suggestions for Practice
341(3)
Conclusion
344(3)
Understanding the Legal Implications of Student Affairs Practice
347(30)
Donald D. Gehring
Student/Institutional Relationship
347(1)
The Judical System
348(6)
Contracts
354(2)
Statutes
356(4)
FERPA
360(3)
Constitutional Issues
363(8)
Summary
371(6)
Developing Effective Campus and Community Relationships
377(16)
C. Arthur Sandeen
Essential Elements of Good Campus Relations
378(3)
Key Campus and Community Relationships
381(7)
Expected Outcomes
388(1)
Questions to Consider
389(3)
Summary
392(1)
Managing Conflict Constructively
393(17)
Leila V. Moore
Challenging the Negative Assumptions
394(2)
Knowledge about Conflict
396(1)
Attitudes Toward Conflict
397(2)
Skills in Managing Conflict
399(1)
Case Examples
400(7)
Summary
407(3)
Maintaining High Ethical Standards
410(15)
Jane M. Fried
Ethics and Cultural Values
411(2)
Virtue Ethics in the Helping Professions
413(3)
Contextual Issues in Ethical Decision Making
416(4)
Creating Environments for Ethical Discussion
420(3)
Conclusion
423(2)
Developing Partnerships with Academic Affairs to Enhance Student Learning
425(28)
Cathy McHugh Engstrom
Vincent Tinto
Barriers to Partnerships
426(5)
A Window of Opportunity for Innovative Types of Partnerships
431(1)
Evolution of the Partnerships Between Student Affairs and Faculty
432(3)
Moving Toward Collaborative Partnerships
435(9)
Recommendations for Promoting Collaborative Relationships
444(4)
Summary
448(1)
References
449(4)
Dealing with Campus Crisis
453(22)
Marsha A. Duncan
Keith M. Miser
Confronting a Crisis Involving a Student
454(3)
Attorney Management
457(2)
Media Management
459(3)
Personal Management
462(2)
Managing a Natural Disaster
464(1)
The Leadership Role of Student Affairs
465(1)
Crisis Coordination and Administration
466(2)
Student Affairs Response to the People on Campus
468(1)
Responding to Staff
469(1)
Debriefing and Evaluation
470(1)
Summary
471(4)
PART FOUR: COMMITMENT TO PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 475(80)
Creating Effective Staff Development Programs
477(15)
James E. Scott
A Rationale for Staff Development
478(2)
Organizational Factors in Staff Development Programs
480(3)
Program Delivery
483(1)
Staff Development: A Multi-Level Approach
484(5)
Practical Suggestions and Recommendations for Staff Development
489(1)
Summary
489(3)
The Role of Professional Associations
492(16)
Elizabeth M. Nuss
A Brief History of Professional Associations
493(2)
Role of Professional Associations
495(11)
Summary
506(2)
Advancing Professionally Through Doctoral Education
508(27)
Susan R. Komives
Deborah J. Taub
Doctorates for Career Success
509(3)
Specialization in Studying Higher Education and Student Affairs
512(1)
Perspectives on Doctoral Programs in Higher Education or Student Affairs Administration
513(7)
Alternative Approaches
520(2)
Assessing a Doctoral Program --- Is it Right for You?
522(3)
Succeeding in Doctoral Study
525(3)
Future Content in Doctoral Preparation
528(1)
Summary
529(6)
New Alternatives for Professional Development
535(20)
Kevin Kruger
Professional Development Background
536(3)
Path to Professional Development
539(8)
Skills for the New Millennium
547(3)
Summary
550(5)
PART FIVE: CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE 555(88)
Who Are the New Students?
557(23)
Robert H. Fenske
James A. Rund
Jann M. Contento
Current Student Profile
558(13)
Role of Student Services in Meeting Future Trends
571(9)
Supporting People, Programs, and Structures for Diversity
580(17)
Christine K. Wilkinson
James A. Rund
Supporting Programs
582(4)
Supporting People
586(6)
Supporting Organizational Structures
592(1)
Summary and Future Implications
593(4)
Fund-raising and Development
597(15)
Michael L. Jackson
Student Affairs and Institutions Respond to a Changed Financial Environment
598(1)
Creating the Foundation for Successful Fund-raising
599(2)
Principles that Guide Student Affairs Fund-raising Efforts
601(9)
Summary
610(2)
Applying Professional Standards and Principles of Good Practice in Student Affairs
612(17)
Elizabeth J. Whitt
Gregory S. Blimling
Principles of Good Practice in Student Affairs
613(9)
Standards
622(4)
Conclusion
626(3)
Leadership for the Future
629(14)
Margaret J. Barr
Mary K. Desler
Author's Note
628(2)
Alternative Futures for Higher Education
630(4)
The Value Added by Student Affairs
634(9)
Name Index 643(8)
Subject Index 651


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