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Hard Evidence : Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology,9780130305671

Hard Evidence : Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology

by
ISBN13:

9780130305671

ISBN10:
0130305677
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
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  • Hard Evidence : Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology
    Hard Evidence : Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology




Summary

An essential addition to any forensics course, this volume of case studies describes both innovative approaches and practical experiences in this dynamic field. It provides students with a strong sense of the types of cases with which forensic anthropologists become involved-as well as their professional and ethical responsibilities-and it demonstrates the truly multidisciplinary nature of the science. CASE STUDIES bull; bull;Introducing Forensic Anthropology, Dawnie Wolfe Steadman. bull;The Herring Case-An Outlier, Karen Ramey Burns. bull;MultidisciplinaryApproach to Human Identification in Homicide Investigation: A Case Study from New York, Douglas H. Ubelaker, Mary Jumbelic, Mark Wilson, and E. Mark Levinsohn. bull;Urban Anthropology: Case Studies from the New York City Medical Examiner's Office, Amy Zelson Mundorff. bull;Multiple Points of Similarity, Dawnie Wolfe Steadman and Lyle W. Konigsberg. bull;Trials in Court. The Forensic Anthropologist Takes the Stand, Kenneth A. R. Kennedy. bull;Love Lost and Gone Forever, David M. Glassman. bull;Unusual "Crime" Scenes: The Role of forensic Anthropology in Recovering and Identifying American MIAs, Robert W. Mann, Bruce E. Anderson, Thomas D. Holland, David R. Rankin, and Johnie E. Webb, Jr. bull;The Contributions of Archaeology and Physical Anthropology to the John McRae Case, Norman J. Sauer, William A. Lovis, Mark E. Blumer, and Jennifer Fillion. bull;Look until You See: Identification of Trauma in Skeletal Material, O.C. Smith, Elayne J. Pope, and Steven A. Symes. bull;The Interface of Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Pathology in Trauma Interpretation, Douglas H. Ubelaker and John E. Smialek. bull;Taphonomy and Time: Estimating the Postmortem Interval, Jennifer C. Love and Murray K. Marks. bull;The Skull on the Lawn: Trophies, Taphonomy, and Forensic Anthropology, P. Willey and Paulette Leach. bull;A Death in Paradise: Human Remains Scavenged by a Shark, Bruce E. Anderson, Anthony Manoukian, Thomas D. Holland, and William E. Grant. bull;MiTOChondrial DNA: Solving the Mystery of Anna Anderson, Terry Melton. bull;The Pawn Shop Mummified Head: Discriminating among Forensic, Historic, and Ancient Contexts, Dawnie Wolfe Steadman. bull;An Incidental Finding, H. Gill-King. bull;Small Bones of Contention, Sam D. Stout. bull;Corpi Aquaticus: The Hardin Cemetery Flood of 1993, Paul S. Sledzik and Allison Webb Willcox. bull;Planes, Trains, and Fireworks: The Evolving Role of the Forensic Anthropologist in Mass Fatality Incidents, Frank P Saul and Julie Mather Saul. bull;Science Contextualized: The Identification of a US. MIA of the Vietnam War from Two Perspectives, Ann Webster Bunch and Colleen Carney Shine. bull;Forensic Anthropology and Human Rights: The Argentine Experience, Mercedes Doretti and Clyde C. Snow.

Table of Contents

1. Introducing Forensic Anthropology, Dawnie Wolfe Steadman.

I. THE MULTIDISCIPLINARY AND LEGAL NATURE OF FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY CASEWORK IN THE UNITED STATES, DAWNIE WOLFE STEADMAN.

2. The Herring Case—An Outlier, Karen Ramey Burns.
3. Multidisciplinary Approach to Human Identification in Homicide Identification: A Case Study from New York, Douglas H. Ubelaker, Mary Jumbelic, Mark Wilson, and E. Mark Levinsohn.
4. Urban Anthropology: Case Studies from the New York City Medical Examiner's Office, Amy Zelson Mundorff.
5. Multiple Points of Similarity, Dawnie Wolfe Steadman and Lyle W. Konigsberg.
6. Trials in Court: The Forensic Anthropologist Takes the Stand, Kenneth A.R. Kennedy.

II. SEARCH AND RECOVERY, DAWNIE WOLFE STEADMAN.

7. Case Study: Love Lost and Gone Forever, David M. Glassman.
8. Unusual “Crime” Scenes: The Role of Forensic Anthropology in the Recovery and Identification of American MIAs, Robert W. Mann, Bruce E. Anderson, Thomas D. Holland, David R. Rankin, and Johnie E. Webb, Jr.
9. The Contributions of Archaeology and Physical Anthropology to the John McRae Case, Norman J. Sauer, William A. Lovis, Mark J. Blummer, and Jennifer Fillion.

III. INTERPRETATION OF TRAUMA AND TAPHONOMY, DAWNIE WOLFE STEADMAN.

10. Look Until You See: Identification of Trauma in Skeletal Material, O.C. Smith, Elayne J. Pope, and Steven A. Symes.
11. The Interface of Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Pathology in Trauma Interpretation, Douglas H. Ubelaker and John E. Smialek.
12. Taphonomy and Time: Estimating the Postmortem Interval, Murray K. Marks and Jennifer C. Love.
13. The Skull on the Lawn: Trophies, Taphonomy, and Forensic Anthropology, P. Willey and Paulette Leach.
14. A Death in Paradise: Human Remains Scavenged by a Shark, Bruce E. Anderson, Anthony Manoukian, Thomas D. Holland and William E. Grant.

IV. ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES IN FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY, DAWNIE WOLFE STEADMAN.

15. Mitochondrial DNA: Solving the Mystery of Anna Anderson, Terry Melton.
16. The Pawn Shop Mummified Skull: Discriminating Among Forensic, Historical and Ancient Contexts, Dawnie Wolfe Steadman.
17. Incidental Findings—A Father's Love, H. Gill-King.
18. Small Bones of Contention, Sam D. Stout.

V. APPLICATIONS OF FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY, DAWNIE WOLFE STEADMAN.

19. Corpi Aquaticus: The Hardin Cemetery Flood of 1993, Paul S. Sledzik and Allison Webb Wilcox
20. Planes, Trains and Fireworks: The Evolving Role of the Forensic Anthropologist in Mass Fatality Incidences, Frank P. Saul and Julie Mather Saul
21. Science Contextualized: The Identification of a U.S. MIA of the Vietnam War from Two Perspectives, Ann Webster Bunch and Colleen Carney Shine.
22. Forensic Anthropology and Human Rights, Mercedes Doretti and Clyde C. Snow.

Excerpts

Nearly twenty years ago, Ted Rathbun and Jane Buikstra published a seminal book,Human Identification: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology,with the notion that forensic anthropologists learn best by sharing case studies. The volume was oriented to their professional colleagues, as the field was little known within the general population. However, case studies made the science easily understandable and the book was therefore attractive to college students and lay people alike. Over the past decade, this accessibility, as well as tremendous media interest in the forensic sciences, has catapulted forensic anthropology out of relative obscurity. In addition to prime time programming, cable television currently offers a daily dose of "forensic detective" programs that frequently highlight forensic anthropology. The popularity of fictional books--including novels by Patricia Cornwell, who often features anthropology, and novels by Kathleen Reichs, a practicing forensic anthropologist whose female protagonist shares her chosen career path--has further thrust the discipline into the public light. Eminent professional forensic anthropologists have also written tomes about their most interesting cases in a manner accessible to scientists and nonscientists alike. The net result is that forensic anthropology is now much more visible on the popular landscape and, most important, in college curricula. Though two decades have passed sinceHuman Identificationwas published, case studies remain at the core of information dissemination among forensic scientists. Not only do case studies demonstrate how formal procedures are implemented and followed, but they also give authors the opportunity to discuss technical and interpretive difficulties they have encountered in the investigative process. The purpose ofHard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropologyis to supplement formal forensic anthropology and osteology texts and manuals with high-quality case studies that demonstrate practical experiences and innovations in the field. While textbooks provide specific methodological and theoretical information imperative to a basic understanding of the subject matter, there is often little opportunity to present a satisfactory number of pertinent case studies that illustrate important points. This book will give introductory and advanced biological anthropology students a strong sense of the scope of forensic anthropological casework in the United States, the professional and ethical responsibilities inherent in forensics, the scientific rigor required, and the multidisciplinary nature of forensic science. Personal identification is the cornerstone of forensic anthropology, and the importance of case reports that include appropriate, well-documented identification methods cannot be overemphasized. However, numerous methodological and technical advances have allowed forensic anthropologists to expand their knowledge beyond traditional roles to make a greater contribution to the forensic sciences. Many forensic anthropologists are well-versed in archaeology, histology, radiology, biomechanics, or odontology, while others have gained significant experience in medicolegal and international policy and procedures. Consequently, forensic anthropologists are now regular members of local search and recovery teams, federal mass disaster response units, and international human rights missions. Forensic anthropologists also facilitate teamwork with other forensic specialists, particularly forensic entomologists, geologists, and botanists, and have strengthened their time-honored partnership with forensic pathologists. Thus, the cases herein capture the spirit of traditional forensic anthropology cases and highlight some of the new skills and opportunities that have helped steer the discipline in new directions. This book is divided into sections that demonstrate the broad scope of modern forensic anthro


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