9780134644868

In Harmony Reading and Writing, MLA Update Edition

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780134644868

  • ISBN10:

    0134644867

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 7/19/2016
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

For combined courses in Developmental Reading and Writing.

This version of In Harmony: Reading and Writing has been updated the reflect the 8th edition of the MLA Handbook (April 2016) *


A focus on sentence- and paragraph-level reading and writing skills

In Harmony, Second Edition is the first text in a two-part integrated reading and writing series. This volume focuses on sentence to paragraph reading and writing skills, while In Concert moves on to explore paragraph and essay level reading and writing. This series aims to show students how reading and writing unite to become a single process of understanding and expressing ideas. 


Emphasizing the harmonious nature of the reading and writing processes, it highlights critical thinking and reinforces its relationship to these processes. Student and professional readings are presented at the start of each chapter and used as the basis for instruction, illustration, and practice. Readings are presented as integrated instructional material, rather than as models or additional practice, allowing students to improve on their own reading and writing skills through a single source. Thematic-based chapters help build continuity, elicit student interest and help students draw on their own prior knowledge. McWhorter’s streamlined presentation and flexible approach work in traditional as well as compressed courses.


*The 8th edition introduces sweeping changes to the philosophy and details of MLA works cited entries. Responding to the “increasing mobility of texts,” MLA now encourages writers to focus on the process of crafting the citation, beginning with the same questions for any source. These changes, then, align with current best practices in the teaching of writing which privilege inquiry and critical thinking over rote recall and rule-following.

Table of Contents

PART ONE     GETTING STARTED

 

1          The Reading Process: An Overview

What Are the Reading Process and Active Reading?

Pre-Reading Strategies 

EXAMINING PROFESSIONAL WRITING

A Textbook Reading “Liking and Loving: Interpersonal Attraction,” Saundra K. Ciccarelli and J. Noland White

During Reading Strategies

Post-Reading Strategies 

Think Critically 48

READ AND RESPOND

A Textbook Reading “Liking and Loving: Interpersonal Attraction,”

Saundra K. Ciccarelli and J. Noland White

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

2          An Overview of the Writing Process

What Is the Writing Process?

Practical Advice About Writing

Connect the Reading and Writing Processes 

EXAMINING PROFESSIONAL WRITING

A Professional Essay “Afghanistan: Where Women Have No Choice,” Kevin Sieff

Six Steps in the Writing Process

EXAMINING STUDENT WRITING

A Student Essay “The Space In-Between,” Santiago Quintana Garcia

Step One: Generate Ideas

Step Two: Consider Audience and Purpose 

Step Three: Organize Ideas

Step Four: Write a First Draft Paragraph or Essay

Step Five: Revise Drafts

Step Six: Proofread

READ AND RESPOND

A Student Essay “The Space In-Between,” Santiago Quintana Garcia

A Professional Essay “Afghanistan: Where Women Have No Choice,” Kevin Sieff

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

3          Vocabulary: Working with Words

Why Is Vocabulary Important?

EXAMINING PROFESSIONAL WRITING

A Textbook Reading “The Power of Words,” Steven A. Beebe, Susan J. Beebe, and Mark V. Redmond

Use Context Clues 

Use Word Parts 

Use a Dictionary Effectively

Use a Thesaurus to Find Synonyms and Antonyms

Understand Denotative and Connotative Language

Use Creative Language 

Learn Vocabulary in College Courses

READ AND RESPOND

A Textbook Reading  “The Power of Words,” Beebe, Beebe, and Redmond

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

        

 

PART TWO    READING AND WRITING PARAGRAPHS

 

4          Main Ideas and Topic Sentences

What Are Topics, Main Ideas, and Topic Sentences?

EXAMINING PROFESSIONAL WRITING

A Textbook Reading “What Is a Sustainable Food System?” Joan Salge Blake

Reading: Understand General Versus Specific Ideas

Identify and Select Topics

EXAMINING STUDENT WRITING

A Student Essay “Reducing Food Waste in the United States,” Alex Boyd

Read and Write Topic Sentences 

READ AND REVISE

READ AND RESPOND

A Student Essay “Reducing Food Waste in the United States,” Alex Boyd

A Textbook Reading “What Is a Sustainable Food System?” Joan Salge Blake

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

5          Details, Transitions, and Implied Main Ideas            

What Are Supporting Details, Transitions, and Implied Main Ideas?

EXAMINING PROFESSIONAL WRITING

A Professional Essay “Wireless Interference: The Health Risks” Christopher Ketcham

Reading: Identify Supporting Details in a Paragraph

EXAMINING STUDENT WRITING

A Student Essay “To Connect or Not to Connect,” Sarah Frey

Writing: Select and Organize Details to Support Your Topic Sentence 

Use Transitional Words and Phrases to Read and Write Paragraphs

Reading: Identify Implied Main Ideas 

READ AND REVISE

READ AND RESPOND

A Student Essay “To Connect or Not to Connect,” Sarah Frey

A Professional Essay “Wireless Interference: The Health Risks,” Christopher Ketcham

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

6          Patterns of Organization: Chronological Order, Process, Narration, and Description

What Are Patterns of Organization?

EXAMINING PROFESSIONAL WRITING

A Textbook Reading “Change Yourself, Change Your World,” April Lynch, Barry Elmore, and Jerome Kotecki

Reading and Writing Time Sequence: Chronological Order, Process,

and Narration

EXAMINING STUDENT WRITING

A Student Essay “How to Pursue a Healthier Lifestyle,” Kate Atkinson

Read and Write Description 

READ AND REVISE

READ AND RESPOND

A Student Essay “How to Pursue a Healthier Lifestyle,” Kate Atkinson

A Textbook Reading “Change Yourself, Change Your World,” April Lynch, Barry Elmore, and Jerome Kotecki

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

7          Patterns of Organization: Example, Cause and Effect, and Comparison and Contrast

Why Use Patterns of Organization?

EXAMINING PROFESSIONAL WRITING

A Textbook Reading “The Benefits of Listening to Music,” Steven Cornelius and Mary Natvig

Reading and Writing Example

EXAMINING STUDENT WRITING

A Student Essay “Poetry and Healing,” Amanda Keithley

Reading and Writing Cause and Effect 

Reading and Writing Comparison and Contrast 

READ AND REVISE

READ AND RESPOND

A Student Essay “Poetry and Healing,” Amanda Keithley

A Textbook Reading “The Benefits of Listening to Music,” Steven Cornelius and Mary Natvig

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

8          Revision and Proofreading

What Are Revision and Proofreading?

Read Carefully and Critically for Revision

EXAMINING STUDENT WRITING

A Student Essay “The Woes of Internet Dating,” Claire Stroup

Revise Ineffective Paragraphs

Use Idea Maps to Spot Revision Problems

Proofread for Correctness

Use Peer Review 

READ AND REVISE

READ AND RESPOND

A Student Essay “The Woes of Internet Dating,” Claire Stroup

A Textbook Reading “Finding a Mate: Not the Same as It Used to Be,” James M. Henslin

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

 

PART THREE             READING, WRITING, AND REVISING ESSAYS

 

9          Reading and Thinking Critically About Text

What Is Critical Reading?

EXAMINING PROFESSIONAL WRITING

A Professional Essay “The Case Against Universal National Service,” Conor Friedersdorf

How to Read Critically

Make Inferences

EXAMINING STUDENT WRITING

A Student Essay “ ‘No Man Is an Island’: The Importance of Community Service,” Juliette Simmons

Identify the Writer’s Purpose

Analyze the Writer’s Intended Audience

Distinguish Between Fact and Opinion

Recognize Bias

READ AND RESPOND

A Student Essay “ ‘No Man Is an Island’: The Importance of Community Service,” Juliette Simmons

A Professional Essay “The Case Against Universal National Service,” Conor Friedersdorf

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

10       Reading and Writing Essays

What Is an Essay?

Use Strategies for Reading Essays 

EXAMINING PROFESSIONAL WRITING

A Textbook Reading “Computer Technology, Large Organizations, and the Assault on Privacy,” John Macionis

Use the Writing Process to Write Essays 

EXAMINING STUDENT WRITING

A Student Essay “Surveillance in America: It’s Not Paranoia If You’re Really Being Watched,” Alaina Mayer

Choose a Topic 

Consider Audience and Purpose 

Develop a Thesis Statement 

Plan and Organize Your Essay 

Locate and Record Sources 

Draft Your Essay 

Revise Your Essay 

READ AND RESPOND

A Student Essay “Surveillance in America: It’s Not Paranoia If You’re Really Being Watched,” Alaina Mayer

A Textbook Reading “Computer Technology, Large Organizations, and the Assault on Privacy,” John Macionis

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

 

PART FOUR SENTENCE BASICS AND GRAMMAR ESSENTIALS

 

11       Complete Sentences Versus Sentence             Fragments

What Is a Complete Sentence?

Identify Subjects and Predicates

Identify Sentence Fragments 156

Recognize and Correct Fragments Caused by Missing Subjects

Recognize and Correct Fragments Caused by Missing Verbs

Recognize and Correct Fragments Caused by Dependent Clauses

Understand Sentences

READ AND REVISE

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

12       Run-on Sentences and Comma Splices         

What Is Punctuation, and Why Is It Important to Use It Correctly?

Recognize and Correct Run-on Sentences

Recognize and Correct Comma Splices

Punctuation as a Guide to Reading

READ AND REVISE

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

Chapter 13   Using Verbs Correctly

What Is a Verb?

Recognize Forms of the Verb

Understand Verb Tense: An Overview

Use the Simple Tenses

Use Irregular Verbs Correctly

Understand Voice: Use Active Instead of Passive Voice

Avoid Errors in Subject–Verb Agreement

What Verbs Tell Readers

READ AND REVISE

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

 

Chapter 14   Combining and Expanding Your Ideas          

What Are Independent and Dependent Clauses?

Combine Ideas of Equal Importance

Combine Ideas of Unequal Importance

Write Compound–Complex Sentences

Identify Meaning Clues from Sentence Structure

READ AND REVISE

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

Chapter 15   Revising Confusing and Inconsistent Sentences

What Is a Confusing or Inconsistent Sentence?

Use Pronouns Clearly and Correctly

Avoid Shifts in Person, Number, and Verb Tense

Avoid Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers

Use Parallelism

Understand Difficult and Complicated Sentences

READ AND REVISE

SELF-TEST SUMMARY

                          

 

A BRIEF GRAMMAR HANDBOOK

 

A.      UNDERSTANDING THE PARTS OF SPEECH

A.1     Nouns

A.2     Pronouns

A.3     Verbs

A.4     Adjectives

A.5     Adverbs

A.6     Conjunctions

A.7     Prepositions

A.8     Interjections

 

B.      UNDERSTANDING THE PARTS OF SENTENCES

B.1     Subjects

B.2     Predicates

B.3     Complements

B.4     Basic Sentence Patterns

B.5     Expanding the Sentence with Adjectives and Adverbs

B.6     Expanding the Sentence with Phrases

B.7     Expanding the Sentence with Clauses

 

C.      WRITING CORRECT SENTENCES

C.1    Uses of Verb Tenses

C.2    Subjunctive Mood

C.3    Pronoun Case

C.4    Correct Adjective and Adverb Use

C.5    Sentence Variety

C.6    Redundancy and Wordiness

C.7    Diction

 

D.      USING PUNCTUATION CORRECTLY

D.1    End Punctuation

D.2    Commas

D.3    Unnecessary Commas

D.4    Colons and Semicolons

D.5    Dashes, Parentheses, Hyphens, Apostrophes, Quotation Marks

 

E.       MANAGING MECHANICS AND SPELLING

E.1     Capitalization

E.2     Abbreviations

E.3     Hyphenation and Word Division

E.4     Numbers

E.5     Suggestions for Improving Spelling

E.6     Six Useful Spelling Rules

 

F.       ERROR CORRECTION EXERCISES

 

 

PART FIVE   THEMATIC READER: WRITING IN RESPONSE TO READING

 

Theme 1 Relationships: The Expected and Unexpected

Reading 1: (Article) Love in the Time of Chronic Illness, John Fortenbury

Reading 2: (Book Excerpt) Man’s Best Oxytocin Enhancer, John Homans

Reading 3: (Article) How to Enjoy the Often Exhausting, Depressing Role of Parenthood, Alice G. Walton

Read and Respond to the Theme

Making Connections

Writing About the Readings

 

Theme 2 Medical Ethics: Issues in Health Care and Human Well-Being

Reading 1: (Textbook) Would You Like a Boy or a Girl? Michael D. Johnson

Reading 2: (Article) Kidneys from Felons? Prisoner Organ Donation Spurs Debate, Kate Bennion

Reading 3: (Book Excerpt) The Benevolent Deception: When Should a Doctor Lie to Patients? Marc E. Agronin

Read and Respond to the Theme

Making Connections

Writing About the Readings

 

Theme 3 Water: A Precious Resource

Reading 1: (Textbook) Human Activities Affect Waterways, Jay Wittgott and Matthew LaPosata

Reading 2: (Article) Why Global Water Shortages Pose Threat of Terror and War, Suzanne Goldberg

Reading 3: (Article) Is the Water Safe Yet? Marin Cogan

Read and Respond to the Theme

Making Connections

Writing About the Readings 

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