CART

(0) items

Health Care Ethics : Principles and Problems,9780130194480
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Health Care Ethics : Principles and Problems

by ; ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130194480

ISBN10:
0130194484
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $64.40
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.01

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Health Care Ethics : Principles and Problems
    Health Care Ethics : Principles and Problems
  • Health Care Ethics Plus MySearchLab with eText -- Access Card Package
    Health Care Ethics Plus MySearchLab with eText -- Access Card Package




Summary

This clear, readable reference explores the full range of contemporary issues in health care ethics from a practical philosophical perspective. Ethical principles are applied directly to cases, and many examples are used to illustrate issues. Avoids medical and philosophical jargon. Offers up-to-date material on today's critical issues like genetic screening and therapy, testing and screening, and biomedical research. Covers institutional ethics and professional standards. Presents alternative views to show readers the diversity of the field. An excellent reference for nurses, doctors, or anyone involved in heath care fields.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH CARE ETHICS
Ethics, Professional Ethics, and Health Care Ethics
1(28)
Theories of Ethics
2(6)
Key Issues
8(7)
Applied Ethics
15(1)
The Professions and Professional Ethics
16(5)
The Health Care Professions
21(6)
Summary
27(1)
Notes
27(2)
Principles of Autonomy and Informed Consent
29(28)
General Formulation
29(1)
Patient Autonomy: Informed Consent
30(9)
Paternalism: Weak and Strong
39(4)
The Consent of Children, Adolescents, and Incompetent Patients
43(2)
Exceptions in Emergencies
45(5)
The Right to Refuse Treatment
50(1)
Problem Areas
51(1)
Summary
52(1)
Cases for Analysis
52(3)
Notes
55(2)
Principles of Beneficence and Nonmaleficence
57(26)
Introduction
57(2)
Specifications of Beneficence
59(2)
Specifications of Nonmaleficence
61(5)
The Patient's Obligation
66(2)
The Health Care Provider's Obligation
68(2)
The Surrogate's Obligation
70(9)
Summary
79(1)
Cases for Analysis
79(2)
Notes
81(2)
The Ethics of Distribution
83(28)
Introduction
83(1)
A Definition of Health and Disease
83(8)
Theories and Their Limits
91(6)
Microallocation: Individual and Institutional Rationing
97(9)
Summary
106(1)
Cases for Analysis
106(3)
Notes
109(2)
Principles of Confidentiality and Truthfulness
111(25)
Introduction
111(1)
Truthfulness
112(5)
Confidentiality
117(14)
Summary
131(1)
Cases for Analysis
131(3)
Notes
134(2)
PROBLEMS OF HEALTH CARE ETHICS
Professional Standards and Institutional Ethics
136(29)
Introduction
136(1)
Judging Quality
137(3)
The Obligation to Police
140(8)
Institutional Ethics
148(4)
Ethics Committees
152(3)
Competition and Institutional Ethics
155(5)
Summary
160(1)
Cases for Analysis
160(3)
Notes
163(2)
Ethical Problems of Death and Dying
165(33)
Introduction
165(1)
Ethics of the Patient
165(5)
Health Care Providers and the Ethics of Suicide Prevention
170(2)
Health Care Providers and the Ethics of the Death of a Patient
172(7)
Physician Initiatives
179(2)
Cooperation with Active Suicide and Euthanasia
181(4)
Surrogates and the Termination of Treatment
185(8)
Summary
193(1)
Cases for Analysis
194(3)
Notes
197(1)
Abortion and Maternal-Fetal Conflict
198(31)
Introduction
198(2)
Does the Fetus Have Rights? U.S. Law
200(1)
The Definition and Types of Abortion
201(2)
The Moral Status of the Fetus
203(4)
The Autonomy of the Pregnant Woman
207(7)
The Ethics of Abortion as a Social Phenomenon
214(2)
Abortion and the Health Care Provider
216(4)
Maternal-Fetal Conflict
220(4)
Summary
224(1)
Cases for Analysis
224(3)
Notes
227(2)
New Methods of Reproduction
229(22)
Introduction
229(1)
Artificial Insemination and the General Problem of Assisted Reproduction
230(3)
In Vitro Fertilization
233(4)
Surrogate Mothers
237(3)
The Charge of Artificiality
240(3)
The Ethics of the Health Care Provider
243(2)
A Question of Distributive Justice
245(1)
Summary
246(1)
Cases for Analysis
247(3)
Notes
250(1)
The Ethics of Transplants
251(27)
Introduction
251(1)
The Ethics of Organ Donation
252(8)
The Ethics of the Recipient
260(1)
The Ethics of the Health Care Team
260(6)
The Health Care Provider's Ethics of Distribution
266(4)
The Society's Ethics of Distribution
270(4)
Summary
274(1)
Cases for Analysis
274(3)
Notes
277(1)
The Ethics of Testing and Screening
278(21)
Introduction
278(1)
Testing
279(9)
Ethical Problems of Mass Screening
288(7)
Summary
295(1)
Cases for Analysis
296(2)
Notes
298(1)
The Ethics of Biomedical Research
299(34)
Introduction
299(1)
The Ethics of the Researcher
300(12)
The Ethics of the User of Research Results
312(5)
Fetal Research
317(4)
Genetic Therapy
321(5)
Clonning
326(1)
Summary
327(1)
Cases for Analysis
328(5)
References 333(20)
Index 353

Excerpts

PREFACE Tom Garrett's passing on New Year's Eve 1997 has dramatically altered our expectations and experience in writing this new edition. This book was initially Tom's idea and while his illness progressively removed him from the labor of writing subsequent editions, his intelligence and spirit nevertheless continued to animate our work. This edition has been accomplished without his presence and guidance, and for the two of us there is an incompleteness to this text that no amount of our time or effort could satisfy. We dedicate this text to his memory in the happy acknowledgment of his continuing influence. The fourth edition embodies several improvements over the third, but contains no dramatic structural alterations. Work has been done to clarify and improve the philosophical reflections that provide the context for the discussion of both principles and problems in the field. Further, we have attempted to provide a natural and unified discussion of the problems associated with the still contentious issues surrounding the end of life. To give added perspective we have provided occasional interludes on insights offered from cultural traditions that are not usually understood to be part of the mainstream discussion of American medical ethics. We have also enlarged the discussion of genetics research and, of course, updated information on many issues. As always, there are many people to thank for their contribution to this text. Several colleagues in the field offered their advice and suggestions regarding the revisions in a symposium organized by the University of Scranton. We thank them and the University for this opportunity. Dr. Baillie would also like to thank the University of Scranton for a sabbatical, during which work was completed for this edition. Our work on genetics research has been aided by the support of the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute, which received funding from the Department of Energy's Human Genome Project. We appreciate that support. Our students have provided a continuing opportunity to test the clarity of our thinking and have challenged our presentation with questions and problems that have enlightened and invigorated us. The medical and health care management communities in Scranton and in the Republic of Slovakia have been both teachers and students for us, providing us with anchors in the school of hard knocks. Thank you to Tom Hickey of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor for his careful review. We would also like to thank Jennifer Ackerman, Emsal Hasan, and Edie Riker at Prentice Hall for their continued confidence in the book and their untiring efforts to bring this edition to completion. Several scholarly presses have provided us with permission to quote from their material, and we appreciate their continued generosity. Finally, and for the fourth time, we would like to thank Eleanore Cooper for her secretarial support so crucial to producing a manuscript, and for her persistent good humor throughout the trials of the last two years. Harold W. Baillie, Ph.D. Rosellen M. Garrett, R.N., Ph.D.


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...