CART

(0) items

Health Management Information Systems : Methods and Practical Applications,9780834217775

Health Management Information Systems : Methods and Practical Applications

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780834217775

ISBN10:
0834217775
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
8/1/2000
Publisher(s):
Jones & Bartlett
List Price: $110.95

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$15.00

Hurry!

Only two copies
in stock at this price.

Buy Used Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
U9780834217775
$21.68

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.26
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 8/1/2000.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Related Products


  • Adaptive Health Management Information Systems : Concepts, Cases, and Practical Applications
    Adaptive Health Management Information Systems : Concepts, Cases, and Practical Applications




Summary

** New Edition Coming Spring 2009   for a thorough, timely, and distinctly effective overview of how information systems are being used in the health care industry today, turn to HEALTH MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS: Methods and Practical Applications, Second Edition . Skillfully revised for both content and format, this exceptional teaching and learning tool gives students a solid command of vital information to set them on the path to professional success. Each chapter opens with a scenario that introduces students to a particular HMIS problem to be understood and overcome; new emphasis on application aids in helpful understanding to readers; graphics and tables throughout the text illustrate concepts for fast comprehension; plus, five major cases based on real-life experience.  

Table of Contents

Contributors xi
Foreword xv
Preface xvii
Acknowledgments xix
PART I---OVERVIEW OF HEALTH MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 1(48)
Health Care Information Systems: An Integrated Management Perspective
3(20)
Joseph K. H. Tan
Scenario
3(1)
Introduction
4(1)
An Integrated Management Perspective in Health Care Information Systems
4(1)
Architecture and Basic Functions of the Health Management Information System
5(7)
Classes of Health Management Information System Applications
12(1)
The Push-Pull Framework
13(4)
Organization of the Book
17(2)
Conclusion
19(1)
Chapter Questions
20(3)
Systems Thinking: Toward a Systems Perspective of Today's Integrated Delivery Systems
23(26)
Joseph K. H. Tan
Scenario
23(1)
Introduction
24(1)
Definitions
25(1)
Concrete versus Abstract Systems
25(1)
General Systems Concepts
26(7)
Systems Thinking
33(3)
Problem Finding and Problem Solving via Systems Thinking
36(1)
Integrated Delivery Systems
37(5)
An Integrated Organizational Model for the Health Service Industry
42(1)
A Three-Tier Organizational Model
43(2)
Conclusion
45(1)
Chapter Questions
46(3)
PART II---BUILDING INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE OF HEALTH MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 49(76)
Health Care Data and Database Concepts: Defining Information Requirements for Integrated Delivery Systems
51(26)
Joseph K. H. Tan
Scenario
51(1)
Introduction
52(1)
Data versus Information versus Knowledge
52(2)
Health Care Data and Data Sources
54(2)
Data Quality
56(2)
Information and Communication
58(2)
Information Architecture and Flow
60(11)
Data Requirements of an Integrated Delivery System
71(3)
Conclusion
74(1)
Chapter Questions
74(3)
Evolving Standards for Integrating Tomorrow's Health Care System: Toward a Service Process Model
77(26)
Joseph K. H. Tan
Ashok Bhatkhande
Scenario
77(1)
Introduction
78(1)
Early Health Record Systems
79(1)
Data Standards
80(2)
Data Models
82(3)
Normalization
85(1)
Interfaced versus Integrated Health Management Information Systems
85(6)
The Service Process Model
91(6)
Conclusion
97(3)
Chapter Questions
100(3)
Systems Development Methodologies: Building Information Architecture for Integrated Delivery Systems
103(22)
Joseph K. H. Tan
Scenario
103(4)
Introduction
107(1)
Systems Development Methodologies
107(1)
Systems Development Life Cycle-Based Methodologies
108(2)
Structured Methodologies
110(2)
Prototyping
112(1)
Contemporary Models
113(5)
End-User Computing
118(3)
Conclusion
121(1)
Chapter Questions
122(3)
PART III---INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY ARCHITECTURE OF HEALTH MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 125(80)
Surveying Health Management Information System Technology Architecture: A State-of-the-Art Review for the Health Service Delivery Industry
127(24)
Joseph K. H. Tan
Wullianallur Raghupathi
Scenario
127(1)
Introduction
128(1)
Hardware Architectural Components
129(3)
Software and User Interface Architectural Components
132(4)
Emerging Forms of Health Management Information System Technology Architecture for Integrated Delivery Systems
136(1)
Virtual Patient Records
136(3)
Document Management
139(1)
Data Warehousing
140(1)
Networking and Asynchronous Transfer Mode Networks
141(1)
Medical Informatics and Telematics
142(3)
The Internet, Intranets, and Extranets
145(1)
Conclusion
146(2)
Chapter Questions
148(3)
Data Warehousing, Data Mining, and Integrated Health Decision Support Systems: A Comprehensive Cancer Surveillance System Architecture
151(28)
Guisseppi A. Forgionne
Aryya Gangopadhyay
Monica Adya
Joseph K. H. Tan
Scenario
151(3)
Introduction
154(1)
Data Warehousing
155(1)
Decision Support Systems
155(2)
Executive Information Systems
157(1)
Expert Systems
158(2)
Additional Technology Architecture and Methods
160(2)
A Comprehensive Cancer Surveillance System Architecture
162(5)
Executive Information System
167(5)
Cancer Surveillance System Evaluation
172(4)
Conclusion
176(1)
Chapter Questions
177(2)
Communications System Architecture: Networking Health Provider Organizations and Building Virtual Communities
179(26)
J. Michael Tarn
H. Joseph Wen
Joseph K. H. Tan
Scenario
179(2)
Introduction
181(1)
Integrating Health Provider Organizations
181(5)
Key Health Care Communication Configuration and System Architecture
186(11)
Building Virtual Communities
197(3)
Conclusion
200(1)
Chapter Questions
201(4)
PART IV---MANAGING DOMAIN AND CONTROL ARCHITECTURE OF HEALTH MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 205(82)
Health Management Information System Strategic Planning and Managerial Accountability: Specifying Domain and Control Architecture
207(28)
Joseph K. H. Tan
Scenario
207(1)
Introduction
208(1)
Management: What and How?
209(1)
The Planning, Organizing, Directing, and Controlling Model
210(3)
Managerial Accountability as the Basis for Health Management Information System Success
213(4)
A Framework for Health Management Information System Strategic Planning and Alignment
217(3)
Information Requirements
220(3)
Information Requirements Methods
223(6)
Managerial Accountability
229(2)
Conclusion
231(1)
Chapter Questions
232(3)
Health Management Information System Resource Management: Safeguarding Domain and Control Architecture
235(24)
Joseph K. H. Tan
Scenario
235(1)
Introduction
236(1)
Health Information Resources
237(2)
Five Aspects of Health Information Resources Management
239(8)
The Roles of the CEO and CIO in Health Information Resources Management
247(3)
A TQM/CQI Paradigm: The Health Management Information System Imperative
250(6)
Conclusion
256(1)
Chapter Questions
257(2)
Health Management Information System Implementation: Implementing Domain and Control Architecture
259(28)
Joseph K. H. Tan
Scenario
259(2)
Introduction
261(1)
Critical Success Factors for Health Management Information System Implementation
262(4)
Strategic Planning and Management Issues
266(8)
Systems Implementation
274(8)
Standards and Legal Issues
282(3)
Conclusion
285(1)
Chapter Questions
285(2)
PART V---APPLICATION CASES OF HEALTH MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 287(80)
Epilogue: Health Management Information System Cases
289(78)
Joseph K. H. Tan
Scenario
289(1)
Introduction
290(1)
The Push-Pull Framework Revisited
290(9)
Conclusion
299(68)
Emergency Medical Transportation Resource Deployment
301(12)
Homer H. Schmitz
Mark L. Corley
A Decision Support System for Bed Assignment at Cedar Rapids Medical Center
313(10)
Liam O'Neill
N. Jane Prater
The Radiology Department at Institution-MED
323(10)
Yao-Yang Shieh
Glenn H. Roberson
Delivering Enterprise-Wide Decision Support through E-Business Applications
333(14)
Rajiv Kohli
Henry J. Groot
Managing a Troubled Health Management Information Systems Project
347(20)
Charalambos L. Iacovou
Albert S. Dexter
Index 367(10)
About the Contributors 377


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...