9780335214716

Health Psychology

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780335214716

  • ISBN10:

    0335214711

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2004-03-01
  • Publisher: Open Univ Pr
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Summary

This text has made a major contribution to the teaching and study of this still rapidly expanding discipline. This substantial revision continues to provide the most accessible and comprehensive guide to the field. Many new features have been incorporated into this edition to aid students and teachers even further, including: Additional chapters on stress Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) section expanded and improved Increased biological coverage New chapter on eating behavior New coverage of problems with social cognition models New section on consequences of CHD and rehabilitation of patients Completely new text design Online Learning Center for students and lecturers This is essential reading for all students and researchers of health psychology and for students of medicine, nursing, and allied health courses.

Author Biography

Jane Ogden is a reader in health psychology at Guy’s, King’s and St.Thomas’ School of Medicine, University of London. She studied for a Ph.D. in eating behaviour at the Institute of Psychiatry, London. She then became a lecturer of health psychology at Middlesex University where she set up a health psychology course.

Table of Contents

List of figures and tables xx
Preface to the third edition xxii
Technology to enhance learning and teaching xxv
Acknowledgements xxvii
1: An introduction to health psychology 1(12)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
1(1)
THE BACKGROUND TO HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
2(1)
WHAT IS THE BIOMEDICAL MODEL?
2(1)
THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
3(3)
Psychosomatic medicine
3(1)
Behavioural health
3(1)
Behavioural medicine
3(1)
Health psychology
4(2)
WHAT ARE THE AIMS OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY?
6(1)
WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY?
7(1)
The clinical health psychologist
7(1)
A professional health psychologist
8(1)
WHAT ARE THE AIMS OF THIS BOOK?
8(1)
A note on theory and health psychology
8(1)
A note on methodology and health psychology
9(1)
THE CONTENTS OF THIS BOOK
9(1)
THE STRUCTURE OF THIS BOOK
10(1)
QUESTIONS
11(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
11(1)
FURTHER READING
11(2)
2: Health beliefs 13(34)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
13(1)
WHAT ARE HEALTH BEHAVIOURS?
14(1)
WHY STUDY HEALTH BEHAVIOURS?
14(4)
McKeown's thesis
14(4)
LAY THEORIES ABOUT HEALTH
18(1)
PREDICTING HEALTH BEHAVIOURS
18(6)
Attribution theory
19(1)
Health locus of control
20(1)
Unrealistic optimism
21(1)
The stages of change model
22(2)
Integrating these different health beliefs: developing models
24(1)
COGNITION MODELS
24(4)
The health belief model
24(3)
The protection motivation theory
27(1)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 2.1: TESTING A THEORY - PREDICTING SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR
28(3)
SOCIAL COGNITION MODELS
31(5)
The theories of reasoned action and planned behaviour
31(3)
The health action process approach
34(2)
PROBLEMS WITH THE MODELS
36(7)
Conceptual problems
36(1)
Methodological problems
36(1)
Predictive problems
37(1)
Predicting intentions: the need to incorporate new cognitions
37(2)
Predicting behaviour: exploring the intention-behaviour gap
39(2)
Developing theory based interventions
41(1)
Putting theory into practice
42(1)
Existing theory based interventions
43(1)
TO CONCLUDE
43(1)
QUESTIONS
44(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
44(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
44(1)
FURTHER READING
45(2)
3: Illness cognitions 47(28)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
47(1)
WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE HEALTHY?
48(1)
WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE ILL?
49(1)
WHAT ARE ILLNESS COGNITIONS?
49(4)
Evidence for these dimensions of illness cognitions
50(1)
Measuring illness cognitions
51(2)
LEVENTHAL'S SELF-REGULATORY MODEL OF ILLNESS COGNITIONS
53(1)
Stage 1: Interpretation
54(1)
Stage 2: Coping
54(1)
Stage 3: Appraisal
54(1)
WHY IS THE MODEL CALLED SELF-REGULATORY?
54(1)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 3.1: TESTING A THEORY - ILLNESS REPRESENTATIONS AND COPING
55(3)
Problems with assessment
58(1)
STAGE 1: INTERPRETATION
58(3)
Symptom perception
58(2)
Social messages
60(1)
STAGE 2: COPING
61(8)
Coping with a diagnosis
61(1)
Coping with the crisis of illness
62(5)
Adjustment to physical illness and the theory of cognitive adaptation
67(1)
The role of illusions
68(1)
Implications for the outcome of the coping process
69(1)
THE POSITIVE INTERPRETATION OF ILLNESS
69(1)
USING THE SELF-REGULATORY MODEL TO PREDICT OUTCOMES
70(1)
Predicting adherence to treatment
70(1)
Predicting recovery from stroke
70(1)
Predicting recovery from MI
71(1)
TO CONCLUDE
71(1)
QUESTIONS
72(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
72(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
72(1)
FURTHER READING
73(2)
4: Docor-patient communication and the role of health professionals' health beliefs 75(24)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
75(2)
WHAT IS COMPLIANCE?
77(1)
PREDICTING WHETHER PATIENTS ARE COMPLIANT: THE WORK OF LEY
77(2)
Patient satisfaction
77(1)
Patient understanding
78(1)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 4.1: TESTING A THEORY - PATIENT SATISFACTION
79(2)
Patient's recall
81(1)
HOW CAN COMPLIANCE BE IMPROVED?
81(2)
The role of information
82(1)
Recommendations for improving compliance
82(1)
THE WIDER ROLE OF INFORMATION IN ILLNESS
83(1)
Information and recovery from surgery
83(1)
Using information to improve recovery
83(1)
THE ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE IN DOCTOR-PATIENT COMMUNICATION
84(1)
Problems with the traditional approach to doctor-patient communication
85(1)
The adherence model of communication
85(1)
THE PROBLEM OF DOCTOR VARIABILITY
85(10)
Explaining variability - clinical decision making as problem solving
86(3)
Explaining variability - the role of health professionals' health beliefs
89(2)
Communicating beliefs to patients
91(1)
Explaining variability - an interaction between health professional and patient
92(1)
Patient centredness
92(1)
Agreement between health professional and patient
93(2)
TO CONCLUDE
95(1)
QUESTIONS
95(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
96(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
96(1)
FURTHER READING
96(3)
5: Smoking and alcohol use 99(34)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
99(1)
WHO SMOKES?
100(1)
WHO DRINKS?
101(1)
HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF SMOKING AND ALCOHOL USE
101(2)
Is smoking bad for health?
101(1)
Is alcohol consumption bad for health?
102(1)
WHAT IS AN ADDICTION?
103(1)
HISTORICAL CHANGES IN ATTITUDE AND THEORETICAL APPROACH
104(2)
The seventeenth century and the moral model of addictions
104(1)
The nineteenth century and the 1st disease concept
105(1)
The twentieth century and the 2nd disease concept
105(1)
The 1970's and onwards - social learning theory
105(1)
WHAT IS THE 2ND DISEASE CONCEPT?
106(1)
A pre-existing physical abnormality
106(1)
A pre-existing psychological abnormality
107(1)
Acquired dependency
107(1)
PROBLEMS WITH A DISEASE MODEL OF ADDICTION
107(1)
WHAT IS THE SOCIAL LEARNING PERSPECTIVE?
108(2)
The processes involved in learning an addictive behaviour
108(1)
Integrating a disease and social learning perspective
109(1)
THE STAGES OF SUBSTANCE USE
110(1)
STAGES 1 AND 2: INITIATING AND MAINTAINING AN ADDICTIVE BEHAVIOUR
110(3)
Smoking initiation and maintenance
110(2)
Alcohol initiation and maintenance
112(1)
Psychological predictors of alcohol limitation and maintenance
112(1)
STAGE 3: THE CESSATION OF AN ADDICTIVE BEHAVIOUR
113(2)
The process of cessation
113(2)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 5.1: TESTING A THEORY - STAGES OF SMOKING CESSATION
115(1)
INTERVENTIONS TO PROMOTE CESSATION
116(6)
Clinical interventions: promoting individual change
116(4)
Public health interventions: promoting cessation in populations
120(2)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 5.2: PUTTING THEORY INTO PRACTICE - WORKSITE SMOKING BAN
122(2)
Methodological problems evaluating clinical and public health interventions
124(1)
STAGE 4: RELAPSE IN SMOKING AND DRINKING
124(4)
Baseline state
125(1)
Pre-lapse state
126(1)
No lapse or lapse?
126(1)
The abstinence violation effect
127(1)
A CROSS-ADDICTIVE BEHAVIOUR PERSPECTIVE
128(1)
Smoking and eating behaviour
128(1)
TO CONCLUDE
129(1)
QUESTIONS
130(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
130(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
130(1)
FURTHER READING
131(2)
6: Eating behaviour 133(34)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
133(1)
WHAT IS A HEALTHY DIET?
134(1)
HOW DOES DIET AFFECT HEALTH?
134(2)
Diet and illness onset
135(1)
Diet and treating illness
135(1)
WHO EATS A HEALTHY DIET?
136(1)
DEVELOPMENTAL MODELS OF EATING BEHAVIOUR
137(6)
Exposure
137(1)
Social learning
138(3)
Associative learning
141(1)
Problems with a developmental model
142(1)
COGNITIVE MODELS OF EATING BEHAVIOUR
143(3)
Using the TRA and TPB
143(1)
Adding extra variables
144(1)
Problems with a cognitive model of eating behaviour
145(1)
A WEIGHT CONCERN MODEL OF EATING BEHAVIOUR
146(2)
The meaning of food and weight
146(1)
What is body dissatisfaction?
146(2)
THE CAUSES OF BODY DISSATISFACTION
148(1)
SOCIAL FACTORS
148(2)
The role of the media
148(1)
Ethnicity
149(1)
Social class
149(1)
The family
150(1)
PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS
150(3)
Beliefs
151(2)
DIETING
153(7)
Dieting and undereating
153(1)
Dieting and overeating
153(1)
The causes of overeating
154(6)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 6.1: TESTING A THEORY - OVEREATING AS A REBELLION
160(4)
Dieting and weight loss
162(1)
The role of dieting in mood and cognitive changes
163(1)
Problems with a weight concern model of eating behaviour
164(1)
TO CONCLUDE
164(1)
QUESTIONS
164(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
164(1)
FURTHER READING
165(2)
7: Exercise 167(16)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
167(1)
DEVELOPING THE CONTEMPORARY CONCERN WITH EXERCISE BEHAVIOUR
168(1)
WHAT IS EXERCISE?
168(1)
WHO EXERCISES?
169(1)
WHY EXERCISE?
169(4)
The physical benefits of exercise
170(1)
The psychological benefits of exercise
171(2)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 7.1: TESTING A THEORY - EXERCISE AND MOOD
173(1)
WHAT FACTORS PREDICT EXERCISE?
174(5)
Social/political predictors of exercise
174(5)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 7.2: TESTING A THEORY - PREDICTING EXERCISE
179(2)
EXERCISE RELAPSE
181(1)
TO CONCLUDE
181(1)
QUESTIONS
182(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
182(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
182(1)
FURTHER READING
182(1)
8: Sex 183(28)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
183(1)
DEVELOPING THE CONTEMPORARY RESEARCH PERSPECTIVES ON SEX
184(10)
Sex as biological, for reproduction
184(1)
Sex as biological, for pleasure
184(2)
Sex as a risk to health 185 Sex as interaction
186(1)
Sex as a risk and pregnancy avoidance
186(1)
What is contraceptive use?
187(1)
Who uses contraception?
187(1)
Developmental models
187(3)
Decision-making models
190(2)
Integrating developmental and decision-making approaches to contraception use
192(2)
SEX AS A RISK IN THE CONTEXT OF STDs/HIV AND AIDS
194(7)
Do people use condoms?
195(2)
Predicting condom use
197(1)
Social cognition models
197(3)
Perceptions of susceptibility - are you at risk?
200(1)
Sex as an interaction between individuals
201(1)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 8.1: TESTING A THEORY - THE SITUATION AND CONDOM USE
201(3)
THE BROADER SOCIAL CONTEXT
204(3)
Sex education
204(2)
Power relations between men and women
206(1)
Social norms of the gay community
206(1)
Discourses about sex, HIV and illness
207(1)
TO CONCLUDE
207(1)
QUESTIONS
208(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
208(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
208(1)
FURTHER READING
209(2)
9: Screening 211(22)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
211(1)
WHAT IS SCREENING?
212(1)
THE HISTORY OF THE SCREENING ETHOS
212(1)
Early screening programmes
212(1)
Recent screening programmes
213(1)
SCREENING AS A USEFUL TOOL
213(1)
GUIDELINES FOR SCREENING
214(1)
PSYCHOLOGICAL PREDICTORS OF THE UPTAKE OF SCREENING
215(2)
Patient factors
215(1)
Health professional factors
216(1)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 9.1: TESTING A THEORY - PREDICTING SCREENING
217(3)
Organizational factors
220(1)
SCREENING AS PROBLEMATIC
220(10)
Is screening ethical?
221(3)
Is screening cost-effective?
224(2)
The effects of screening on the psychological state of the individual
226(1)
The debates
226(3)
Why has this backlash happened?
229(1)
TO CONCLUDE
230(1)
QUESTIONS
230(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
230(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
230(1)
FURTHER READING
231(2)
10: Stress 233(18)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
233(1)
WHAT IS STRESS?
234(1)
THE DEVELOPMENT OF STRESS MODELS
234(4)
Cannon's fight or flight model
234(1)
Selye's general adaptation syndrome
234(1)
Life events theory
235(3)
A ROLE FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS IN STRESS
238(3)
The transactional model of stress
238(1)
Does appraisal influence the stress response?
239(1)
What events are appraised as stressful?
240(1)
Self-control and stress
240(1)
STRESS AND CHANGES IN PHYSIOLOGY
241(2)
Stress reactivity
242(1)
MEASURING STRESS
243(3)
Laboratory setting
243(1)
Naturalistic setting
243(1)
Physiological measures
244(1)
Self-report measures
244(2)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 10.1: PUTTING THEORY INTO PRACTICE
246(2)
Laboratory versus naturalistic measures
247(1)
Physiological versus self-report measures
248(1)
THE INTERACTION BETWEEN PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF STRESS
248(1)
TO CONCLUDE
248(1)
QUESTIONS
249(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
249(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
250(1)
FURTHER READING
250(1)
11: Stress and illness 251(34)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
251(1)
DOES STRESS CAUSE ILLNESS?
252(2)
How does stress cause illness?
252(1)
The chronic process
253(1)
The acute process
253(1)
STRESS AND CHANGES IN BEHAVIOUR
254(3)
Smoking
254(1)
Alcohol
255(1)
Eating
255(1)
Exercise
256(1)
Accidents
256(1)
Illness as a stressor
256(1)
STRESS AND CHANGES IN PHYSIOLOGY
257(1)
Stress and illness onset and progression
257(1)
Interaction between the behavioural and physiological pathways
258(1)
INDIVIDUAL VARIABILITY IN THE STRESS-ILLNESS LINK
258(2)
Stress reactivity
258(1)
Stress recovery
259(1)
Allostatic load
259(1)
Stress resistance
259(1)
PSYCHONEUROIMMUNOLOGY (PNI)
260(5)
The immune system
260(1)
Conditioning the immune system
260(1)
Measuring immune changes
261(1)
Psychological state and immunity
261(1)
Mood
261(1)
Beliefs
262(1)
Emotional expression
262(2)
Stress
264(1)
THE IMPACT OF CHRONIC STRESS
265(2)
Job stress
265(1)
Relationship stress
266(1)
WHICH FACTORS MODERATE THE STRESS-ILLNESS LINK?
267(1)
COPING
268(5)
What is coping?
268(1)
Ways of coping
269(2)
Measuring coping
271(2)
SOCIAL SUPPORT
273(1)
What is social support?
273(1)
Does social support affect health?
273(1)
How does social support influence health?
273(1)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 11.1: TESTING A THEORY: SOCIAL SUPPORT AND HEALTH
274(2)
PERSONALITY
276(2)
Who is hostile?
277(1)
How does hostility link to stress?
277(1)
How does hostility link to illness?
277(1)
CONTROL
278(2)
What is control?
278(1)
Does control affect the stress response?
278(1)
Does control affect health?
279(1)
How does control mediate the stress-illness link?
280(1)
The possible benefits of low control
280(1)
CONTROL AND SOCIAL SUPPORT IN STRESS AND ILLNESS
280(1)
TO CONCLUDE
281(1)
QUESTIONS
282(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
282(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
282(1)
FURTHER READING
283(2)
12: Pain 285(22)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
285(1)
WHAT IS PAIN?
286(1)
EARLY PAIN THEORIES - PAIN AS A SENSATION
286(1)
INCLUDING PSYCHOLOGY IN THEORIES OF PAIN
287(1)
THE GATE CONTROL THEORY OF PAIN
287(3)
Input to the gate
288(1)
Output from the gate
288(1)
How does the GCT differ from earlier models of pain?
288(1)
What opens the gate
289(1)
What closes the gate
289(1)
Problems with the GCT
289(1)
THE ROLE OF PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS IN PAIN PERCEPTION
290(1)
SUBJECTIVE-AFFECTIVE-COGNITIVE PROCESSES
291(4)
The role of learning
291(1)
The role of affect
291(1)
The role of cognition
292(2)
Behavioural processes
294(1)
The interaction between these different processes
294(1)
THE ROLE OF PSYCHOLOGY IN PAIN TREATMENT
295(3)
Cognitive behavioural therapy
296(2)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 12.1: PUTTING THEORY INTO PRACTICE - TREATING CHRONIC PAIN
298(4)
Placebos and pain reduction
301(1)
THE OUTCOME OF PAIN TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT - A ROLE FOR PAIN ACCEPTANCE?
302(1)
MEASURING PAIN
303(1)
Self-reports
303(1)
Observational assessment
303(1)
Physiological measures
303(1)
TO CONCLUDE
304(1)
QUESTIONS
304(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
304(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
305(1)
FURTHER READING
305(2)
13: Placebos and the interrelationship between beliefs, behaviour and health 307(20)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
307(2)
WHAT IS A PLACEBO?
309(1)
A HISTORY OF INERT TREATMENTS
309(1)
Modern-day placebos
310(1)
Placebos - to be taken out of an understanding of health?
310(1)
HOW DO PLACEBOS WORK?
310(5)
Non-interactive theories
311(1)
Interactive theories
312(3)
Physiological theories
315(1)
THE CENTRAL ROLE OF PATIENT EXPECTATIONS
315(1)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 13.1: TESTING A THEORY - 'DOING AS YOU'RE TOLD' AS A PLACEBO
316(3)
COGNITIVE DISSONANCE THEORY
319(3)
The effect of investment
319(1)
Justification and changes in symptoms
319(1)
Evidence for the role of justification
320(1)
An example of Totman's theory
321(1)
Support for cognitive dissonance theory
321(1)
Problems with cognitive dissonance theory
322(1)
THE ROLE OF PLACEBO EFFECTS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
322(3)
Health beliefs
322(1)
Illness cognitions
323(1)
Health professionals' health beliefs
323(1)
Health-related behaviours
324(1)
Stress
324(1)
Pain
324(1)
Implications for dualism
324(1)
TO CONCLUDE
325(1)
QUESTIONS
325(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
325(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
325(1)
FURTHER READING
326(1)
14: HIV and cancer: psychology throughout the course of illness (1) 327(24)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
327(2)
HIV AND AIDS
329(2)
The history of HIV
329(1)
What is HIV?
329(1)
The progression from HIV to AIDS
330(1)
The prevalence of HIV and AIDS
330(1)
THE ROLE OF PSYCHOLOGY IN THE STUDY OF HIV
331(5)
Psychology and susceptibility to the HIV virus
333(1)
Psychology and progression from HIV to AIDS
334(1)
Psychology and longevity
335(1)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 14.1: TESTING A THEORY - PSYCHOLOGY AND IMMUNE FUNCTIONING
336(2)
CANCER
338(7)
What is cancer?
338(1)
The prevalence of cancer
339(1)
The role of psychology in cancer
339(1)
The psychosocial factors in the initiation and promotion of cancer
339(3)
Psychological consequences of cancer
342(1)
Psychology and the alleviation of symptoms
343(1)
Psychological factors in longevity
344(1)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 14.2: PUTTING THEORY INTO PRACTICE - TREATING CANCER SYMPTOMS
345(3)
TO CONCLUDE
348(1)
QUESTIONS
348(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
348(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
348(1)
FURTHER READING
349(2)
15: Obesity and coronary heart disease: psychology throughout the course of illness (2) 351(32)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
351(2)
OBESITY
353(1)
The role of psychological factors in obesity
353(1)
WHAT IS OBESITY?
353(1)
HOW COMMON IS OBESITY?
354(1)
WHAT ARE THE PROBLEMS WITH OBESITY?
355(1)
Physical problems
355(1)
Psychological problems
355(1)
WHAT CAUSES OBESITY?
356(9)
Physiological theories
356(2)
Behavioural theories
358(7)
What does all this research mean?
365(1)
OBESITY TREATMENT
365(3)
Traditional treatment approaches
365(1)
Multidimensional behavioural programmes
366(1)
The role of dieting in treating obesity
367(1)
SHOULD OBESITY BE TREATED AT ALL?
368(2)
The benefits of treatment
368(1)
The treatment alternatives
369(1)
Drug treatments of obesity
369(1)
Surgical treatments of obesity
370(1)
CONCLUSION
370(1)
CORONARY HEART DISEASE (CHD)
371(3)
What is CHD?
371(1)
The prevalence of CHD
371(1)
Risk factors for CHD
372(1)
The role of psychology in CHD
372(1)
Beliefs about CHD
372(1)
The psychological impact of CHD
373(1)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 15.1: TESTING A THEORY: THE CONSEQUENCES OF DISEASE
374(5)
Predicting and changing behavioural risk factors for CHD
376(1)
Psychology and rehabilitation of patients with CHD
377(2)
Conclusion
379(1)
TO CONCLUDE
379(1)
QUESTIONS
379(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
380(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
380(1)
FURTHER READING
380(3)
16 Measuring health status: from mortality reates to quality of life 383(14)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
383(1)
MORTALITY RATES
384(1)
MORBIDITY RATES
384(1)
MEASURES OF FUNCTIONING
384(1)
SUBJECTIVE HEALTH STATUS
385(1)
WHAT IS QUALITY OF LIFE?
385(3)
Creating a conceptual framework
386(1)
How should it be measured?
387(1)
FOCUS ON RESEARCH 16.1: PUTTING THEORY INTO PRACTICE - EVALUATING HIP REPLACEMENT SURGERY
388(2)
A SHIFT IN PERSPECTIVE
390(1)
Value
390(1)
Subjectivity of the subject
390(1)
Subjectivity of the researcher
391(1)
Definition of health
391(1)
USING QUALITY OF LIFE IN RESEARCH
391(2)
Quality of life as an outcome measure
392(1)
Quality of life as a predictor of longevity
393(1)
TO CONCLUDE
393(1)
QUESTIONS
394(1)
FOR DISCUSSION
394(1)
ASSUMPTIONS IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
394(1)
FURTHER READING
395(2)
17 The assumptions of health psychology 397(6)
CHAPTER OVERVIEW
397(1)
THE ASSUMPTIONS OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
398(2)
The mind-body split
398(1)
Dividing up the soup
398(1)
The problem of progression
398(1)
The problem of methodology
399(1)
The problem of measurement
399(1)
Integrating the individual with their social context
399(1)
Data are collected in order to develop theories; these theories are not data
400(1)
Theories concerning different areas of health psychology are distinct from each other
400(1)
STUDYING A DISCIPLINE
400(1)
FURTHER READING
401(2)
Methodology glossary 403(2)
References 405(54)
Index 459

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