The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk About When We Talk About Hip Hop--and Why It Matters

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  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 12/1/2008
  • Publisher: Perseus Books

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Hip-hop is in crisis. For the past dozen years, the most commercially successful hip-hop has become increasingly saturated with caricatures of black gangstas, thugs, pimps, and 'hos. The controversy surrounding hip-hop is worth attending to and examining with a critical eye because, as scholar and cultural critic Tricia Rose argues, hip-hop has become a primary means by which we talk about race in the United States. In The Hip-Hop Wars, Rose explores the most crucial issues underlying the polarized claims on each side of the debate: Does hip-hop cause violence, or merely reflect a violent ghetto culture? Is hip-hop sexist, or are its detractors simply anti-sex? Does the portrayal of black culture in hip-hop undermine black advancement? A potent exploration of a divisive and important subject, The Hip-Hop Wars concludes with a call for the regalvanization of the progressive and creative heart of hip-hop. What Rose calls for is not a sanitized vision of the form, but one that more accurately reflects a much richer space of culture, politics, anger, and yes, sex, than the current ubiquitous images in sound and video currently provide.

Author Biography

Tricia Rose is a professor of Africana Studies at Brown University. She specializes in twentieth- and twenty-first-century African-American culture and politics, social thought, popular culture, and gender issues. The author of the seminal Black Noise, she lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

Table of Contents

Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 1
Top Ten Debates in Hip Hop
Hip Hop's Critics
Hip Hop Causes Violencep. 33
Hip Hop Reflects Black Dysfunctional Ghetto Culturep. 61
Hip Hop Hurts Black Peoplep. 75
Hip Hop Is Destroying America's Valuesp. 95
Hip Hop Demeans Womenp. 113
Hip Hop's Defenders
Just Keeping It Realp. 133
Hip Hop Is Not Responsible for Sexismp. 149
"There are Bitches and Hoes"p. 167
We're Not Role Modelsp. 187
Nobody Talks About the Positive in Hip Hopp. 201
Progressive Futures
Mutual Denials in the Hip Hop Warsp. 217
Progressive Voices, Energies, and Visionsp. 241
Six Guiding Principles for Progressive Creativity, Consumption, and Community in Hip Hop and Beyondp. 261
Radio Station Consolidationp. 274
Acknowledgmentsp. 277
Notesp. 279
Bibliographyp. 289
Indexp. 293
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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