9780521600491

A History of Archaeological Thought

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780521600491

  • ISBN10:

    0521600499

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 9/11/2006
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press

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Summary

In its original edition, Bruce Trigger’s book was the first ever to examine the history of archaeological thought from medieval times to the present in world-wide perspective. Now, in this new edition, he both updates the original work and introduces new archaeological perspectives and concerns. At once stimulating and even-handed, it places the development of archaeological thought and theory throughout within a broad social and intellectual framework. The successive but interacting trends apparent in archaeological thought are defined and the author seeks to determine the extent to which these trends were a reflection of the personal and collective interests of archaeologists as these relate - in the West at least - to the fluctuating fortunes of the middle classes. While subjective influences have been powerful, Professor Trigger argues that the gradual accumulation of archaeological data has exercised a growing constraint on interpretation. In turn, this has increased the objectivity of archaeological research and enhanced its value for understanding the entire span of human history and the human condition in general.

Author Biography

Bruce G. Trigger is James McGill Professor in the Department of Anthropology at McGill University

Table of Contents

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS xi
PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION xv
1 Studying the History of Archaeology
Approaches to the History of Archaeology
5(12)
Social Context
17(9)
Archaeological Interpretation
26(12)
Challenge
38(2)
2 Classical and Other Text-Based Archaeologies 40(40)
Interests in the Past
40(8)
The Medieval View of History
48(4)
Renaissance Antiquarianism
52(15)
The Development of Classical Archaeology 6i
Egyptology and Assyriology
67(7)
Other First Archaeologies
74(3)
Conclusions
77(3)
3 Antiquarianism without Texts 80(41)
Antiquarianism in Northern Europe
81(11)
Recognition of Stone Tools
92(5)
The Enlightenment
97(9)
Scientific Antiquarianism
106(4)
Antiquarianism and Romanticism
110(4)
The New World
114(4)
The Impasse of Antiquarianism
118(3)
4 The Beginnings of Prehistoric Archaeology 121(45)
Relative Dating
121(8)
The Development and Spread of Scandinavian Archaeology
129(9)
The Antiquity of Humanity
138(9)
Palaeolithic Archaeology
147(9)
Reaction against Evolution
156(2)
Archaeology in North America
158(6)
Conclusions
164(2)
5 Evolutionary Archaeology 166(45)
The Rise of Racism
167(4)
Lubbock's Synthesis
171(6)
Colonial Archaeology in the United States
177(12)
Australian Prehistory
189(4)
Archaeology in New Zealand
193(2)
Racist Archaeology in Africa
195(12)
The Legacy of Evolutionary Archaeology
207(4)
6 Culture-Historical Archaeology 211(103)
Early Interests in Ethnicity
211(6)
Diffusionism
217(6)
The Montelian Synthesis of European Prehistory
223(9)
The Concept of Culture
232(3)
The Birth of Culture-Historical Archaeology
235(6)
Childe and The Dawn of European Civilization
241(7)
European Archaeology and Nationalism
248(13)
Other National Archaeologies
261(17)
Culture-Historical Archaeology in the United States
278(12)
Technical Developments
290(13)
Theory
303(8)
Conclusions
311(3)
7 Early Functional-Processual Archaeology 314(72)
Environmental Functional-Processualism
315(4)
Social Anthropology
319(3)
Economic Approaches
322(4)
Soviet Archaeology
326(18)
Childe as a Marxist Archaeologist
344(9)
Grahame Clark
353(8)
Early Functionalism in the United States
361(6)
The Conjunctive Approach
367(5)
Ecological and Settlement Archaeology
372(10)
World Archaeology
382(2)
Conclusions
384(2)
8 Processualism and Postprocessualism 386(98)
Neoevolutionism
386(6)
Early New Archaeology
392(26)
The Diversification of Processual Archaeology
418(26)
Postprocessual Archaeology
444(34)
Continental European Alternatives
478(2)
Discussion
480(4)
9 Pragmatic Synthesis 484(45)
Competing Approaches
485(12)
Theoretical Convergence
497(11)
Middle-Ranging Theory
508(11)
High-Level Theory
519(10)
10 The Relevance of Archaeology 529(20)
The Challenge of Relativism
529(3)
The Development of Archaeology
532(6)
Relations with Other Social Sciences
538(2)
Coping with Subjectivity
540(9)
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY 549(34)
REFERENCES 583(98)
INDEX 681

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