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History of Modern Art : Painting Sculpture Architecture Photography,9780131840690
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History of Modern Art : Painting Sculpture Architecture Photography

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780131840690

ISBN10:
013184069X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
PRENTICE HALL

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Summary

For undergraduate course in Modern Art, Origins of Modernism, Art Since 1945, Contemporary Art and other courses focusing on art in the 20th century. Long considered the survey of modern art, this engrossing and liberally illustrated text traces the development of trends and influences in painting, sculpture, photography and architecture from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. Retaining its comprehensive nature and chronological approach, it now comes thoroughly reworked by Michael Bird, an experienced art history editor and writer, with refreshing new analyses, a considerably expanded picture program, and a more absorbing and unified narrative.

Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments x
The Sources of Modern Painting
1(14)
Changing Perspectives: From Renaissance to Baroque
2(3)
Making Sense of a Turbulent World: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
5(8)
Academic Art and the Salon
13(2)
Realism, Impressionism, and Early Photography
15(31)
New Ways of Seeing: Photography and its Influence
15(6)
A Chastened Vision: Realism in Art
21(3)
Seizing the Moment: Impressionism and the Avant-Garde
24(13)
Nineteenth-Century Art in the United States
37(9)
Post-Impressionism
46(26)
The Poetic Science of Color: Seurat and the Neo-Impressionists
47(3)
Form and Nature: Paul Cezanne
50(5)
A Visual Language of the Heart and Soul: Symbolism
55(5)
Innocence and Experience: Gauguin and Van Gogh
60(5)
A New Generation of Prophets: The Nabis
65(7)
The Origins of Modern Architecture and Design
72(10)
Palaces of Iron and Glass: The Influence of Industry
72(3)
``A Return to Simplicity'': The Arts and Crafts Movement and Experimental Architecture
75(2)
``Form Follows Function'': The Chicago School and the Origins of the Skyscraper
77(5)
Art Nouveau and the Beginnings of Expressionism
82(15)
Natural Forms for the Machine Age: The Art Nouveau Aesthetic
82(9)
Toward Expressionism: Late Nineteenth-Century Painting beyond France
91(6)
The Origins of Modern Sculpture
97(11)
The Painter--Sculptors: Daumier, Degas, and Gauguin
98(1)
An Art Reborn: Auguste Rodin
99(6)
Exploring New Possibilities: Claudel, Maillol, Bourdelle, and Rosso
105(3)
Fauvism
108(16)
``Purity of Means'' in Practice: Henri Matisse's Early Career
108(7)
``Wild Beasts Tamed'': Derain, Vlaminck, and Dufy
115(3)
Colors of the Spiritual Eye: Georges Rouault
118(1)
The Belle Epoque on Camera: The Lumiere Brothers and Lartigue
119(1)
Modernism on a Grand Scale: Matisse's Art after Fauvism
120(4)
Expressionism in Germany
124(21)
Making it Personal: Modersohn-Becker and Nolde
124(2)
Joining the Revolution: Die Brucke
126(5)
Graphic Impact: Expressionist Prints
131(3)
The Spiritual Dimension: Der Blaue Reiter
134(7)
Self-Examination: Expressionism in Austria
141(4)
The Figurative Tradition in Early Twentieth-Century Sculpture
145(11)
A Parallel Medium: The Sculpture of Henri Matisse
146(2)
Developments in Germany: Lehmbruck, Kolbe, Banlach, and Kollwitz
148(2)
Forms of the Essential: Constantin Brancusi
150(6)
Cubism
156(37)
Taking Possession: Picasso's Early Career
156(8)
Beyond Fauvism: Braque's Early Career
164(3)
``Two Mountain Climbers Roped Together'': Braque, Picasso, and the Development of Cubism
167(9)
Constructed Spaces: Cubist Sculpture
176(6)
An Adaptable Idiom: Developments in Cubist Painting in Paris
182(5)
Other Agendas: Orphism and Other Experimental Art in Paris, 1910--14
187(6)
Futurism, Abstraction in Russia, and de Stiil
193(26)
``Running on Shrapnel'': Futurism in Italy
193(6)
A World Ready for Change: Early Abstraction in Russia
199(7)
Utopian Visions: Russian Constructivism
206(7)
Clarity, Certainty, and Order: De Stijl in the Netherlands
213(6)
Early Twentieth-Century Architecture
219(17)
Modernism in Harmony with Nature: Frank Lloyd Wright
219(4)
Temples for the Modern City: American Classicism 1900--15
223(1)
New Simplicity Versus Art Nouveau: Vienna Before World War I
224(2)
Tradition and Innovation: The German Contribution to Modern Architecture
226(3)
Toward the International Style: The Netherlands and Belgium
229(5)
New Materials, New Visions: France and Italy
234(2)
From fantasy to Dada and the New Objectivity
236(31)
Truth Pursued through the Dreamworld: Chagall and the Metaphysical School
236(5)
The World Turned Upside Down: The Birth of Dada
241(5)
A Further Shore: New York Dada
246(8)
``Art is Dead'': Dada in Germany
254(5)
Idealism and Disgust: The ``New Objectivity'' in Germany
259(6)
Dada Divided: Developments in Paris
265(2)
The School of Paris After World War I
267(21)
Eloquent Figuration: Les Maudits
267(5)
Dedication to Color: Matisse's Later Career
272(5)
Celebrating the Good Life: Dufy's Later Career
277(1)
Eclectic Mastery: Picasso After the High-Point of Cubism
278(5)
Sensuous Analysis: Braque's Later Career
283(2)
Austerity and Elegance: Leger, Ozenfant, and Le Corbusier
285(3)
Surrealism
288(41)
Breton and the Background to Surrealism
288(2)
``Art is a Fruit'': Arp's Later Career
290(2)
Hybrid Menageries: Ernst's Surrealist Techniques
292(3)
``Night, Music, and Stars'': Miro' and Organic--Abstract Surrealism
295(3)
Methodical Anarchy: Andre Masson
298(1)
Enigmatic Landscapes: Yves Tanguy
299(2)
``A Laboratory for New Ideas'': Surrealism and the Americas
301(2)
``The Association of Delirious Phenomena'': Salvador Dali
303(4)
Three Northern European Surrealists: Magritte, Delvaux, and Bellmer
307(3)
Women and Surrealism: Oppenheim, Tanning, and Carrington
310(2)
Never Quite ``One of Ours'': Picasso and Surrealism
312(7)
Pioneer of a New Iron Age: Julio Gonzalez
319(1)
Surrealism's Sculptural Language: Giacometti's Early Career
320(2)
Bizarre Juxtapositions: Photography and Surrealism
322(7)
Modern Architecture Between the Wars
329(14)
The Building as Entity: The Bauhaus
329(2)
Audacious Lightness: The Architecture of Gropius
331(2)
``Machines for Living'': The International Style
333(4)
A Return to Innovation: Developments in American Architecture
337(6)
International Abstraction Between the Wars
343(28)
``The Core from which Everything Emanates'': International Constructivism and the Bauhaus
343(13)
A Determined Minority: Abstract Artists in Paris
356(5)
American Connections: Mondrian and Calder
361(4)
Responses to International Abstraction: Artists in Britain
365(6)
American Art Before World War II
371(39)
America Undisguised: The Eight and Social Criticism
371(4)
A Rallying Place for Modernism: 291 Gallery and the Stieglitz Circle
375(8)
The Europeans Are Coming: The Armory Show
383(1)
Sharpening the Focus on Color and Form: Synchromism and Precisionism
383(4)
Painting the American Scene: Regionalists and Social Realists
387(8)
Documents of an Era: American Photographers Between the Wars
395(3)
Black History and Modern Painting: Bearden and Lawrence
398(1)
Social Protest and Personal Pain: Mexican Artists
399(4)
The Avant-Garde Advances: Toward American Abstract Art
403(5)
Sculpture in America Between the Wars
408(2)
Abstract Expressionism and the New American Sculpture
410(36)
Entering a New Arena: Modes of Abstract Expressionism
410(1)
The Picture as Event: Experiments in Gestural Painting
411(12)
Complex Simplicities: Color Field Painting
423(10)
Drawing in Steel: Constructed Sculpture
433(4)
Textures of the Surreal: Biomorphic Sculpture and Assemblage
437(5)
Expressive Vision: Developments in American Photography
442(4)
Postwar European Art
446(32)
Revaluations and Violations: Figurative Art in France
446(9)
A Different Art: Abstraction in France
455(6)
``Pure Creation'': Concrete Art
461(1)
Postwar Juxtapositions: Figuration and Abstraction in Italy and Spain
462(5)
``Forget It and Start Again'': The CoBrA Artists and Hundertwasser
467(4)
Figures in the Landscape: British Painting and Sculpture
471(5)
Marvels of Daily Life: European Photographers
476(2)
Pop Art and Europe's New Realism
478(45)
``This is Tomorrow'': Pop Art in Britain
478(4)
Signs of the Times: Neo-Dada in the United States
482(6)
Getting Closer to Life: Happenings and Environments
488(5)
``Just Look at the Surface'': The Imagery of Everyday Life
493(11)
Poetics of the ``New Gomorrah'': West Coast Artists
504(5)
``Extroversion is the Rule'': Europe's New Realism
509(8)
Personal Documentaries: The Snapshot Aesthetic in American Photography
517(6)
Sixties Abstraction
523(38)
Drawing the Veil: Post-Painterly Color Field Abstraction
523(6)
At an Oblique Angle: Diebenkorn and Twombly
529(2)
Forming the Unit: Hard-Edge Painting
531(5)
Seeing Things: Op Art
536(2)
New Media Mobilized: Motion and Light
538(5)
The Limits of Modernism: Minimalist Sculpture and Painting
543(17)
Complex Unities: Photography and Minimalism
560(1)
The Second Wave of International Style Architecture
561(27)
The Avant-Garde Diaspora: Architecture in the 1930s
561(1)
``The Quiet Unbroken Wave'': The Later Work of Wright and Le Corbusier
562(3)
Purity and Proportion: The International Style in America
565(7)
Internationalism Contextualized: Developments in Scandinavia, Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Australia
572(7)
Breaking the Mold: Experimental Housing
579(3)
Arenas for Innovation: Major Public Projects
582(6)
The Pluralistic Seventies
588(67)
Forms of Thought: Conceptual Art
589(3)
Extended Arenas: Performance Art and Video
592(7)
Radical Alternatives: Feminist Art
599(6)
Metaphors for Life: Process Art
605(7)
Big Outdoors: Earthworks and Land Art
612(9)
Visible Statements: Monuments and Public Sculpture
621(4)
Body of Evidence: Figurative Art
625(9)
Constructing Respect: Art and Racial Politics
634(6)
Animated Surfaces: Pattern and Decoration
640
Figure and Ambiguity: New Image Art
433(222)
Postmodernism in Architecture
655(30)
``Complexity and Contradiction'': The Reaction Against Modernism Sets In
656(2)
In Praise of ``Messy Vitality'': Postmodernist Eclecticism
658(6)
Ironic Grandeur: Postmodernism and History
664(8)
What Is a Building?: Deconstruction
672(3)
Structure as Metaphor: Architectural Abstractions
675(3)
Flexible Spaces: Architecture and Urbanism
678(7)
The Retrospective Eighties
685(45)
Codes of Context: Appropriation
685(8)
Primal Passions: Neo-Expressionism
693(11)
The Challenge of Photography in 1980s Art
704(2)
Searing Statements: Expressive (if not Expressionist) Art
706(3)
Wall of Fame: Graffiti and Cartoon Artists
709(3)
Postmodern Arenas: Installation Art
712(46)
In the Empire of Signs: Varieties of Neo-Geo
758
The Sum of Many Parts: Abstraction in the 1980s
722(4)
Strangely Familiar: British and American Sculpture
726(4)
Resistance and Resolution
730(46)
Contested Visions: Art and Politics circa 1990
730(2)
Mining the Museum: Art and Institutions
732(4)
The Postmodern ``I'': The Artist as Individual
736(12)
The Postmodern ``We'': The Artist and Society
748(10)
Reprise and Reinterpretation: The Art of Art History
758(2)
Considering Nature: New Visions of Landscape
760(4)
Meeting Points: Painting and Sculpture as Social (ized) Spaces
764(6)
The Consequences of Tradition: Pictorialism and Sculpture
770(3)
Think Before You Buy: Art and Cultural Industry
773(3)
Bibliography 776(23)
Glossary 799(3)
Index 802(24)
Credits 826

Excerpts

At the start of the twenty-first century, the term "modern art" already has something of a venerable ring to it. It has joined other capacious art historical categories, such as "Renaissance" or "Romanticism," which, though they may usefully serve to give shape to broad contours of art history, become less clear in meaning and more open to dispute the closer you get to detailed discussion of specific works of art. The only difference between these and "modern art" is that modern art as a temporal category is still open-ended: it is, by one definition, simply the art of the present day. But it also includes the early paintings of Matisse and Malevich, Braque's Cubist collages, and the first building designs by Frank Lloyd Wright--products of a world that now feels very distant indeed, separated from us by two world wars, the atomic bomb, and the Internet. The words "modern art" have soaked up so much history that they can never again mean what they once meant (or at least, not with the same heady conviction): shockingly new, bewilderingly progressive, utterly of the present moment, unprecedented-though they still encompass that. A Short History ofHistory of Modern Art Just as "modern" is a many-layered term, this book, now in its fifth edition, has a history of its own. As the term "modern art" has broadened and been reinterpreted over time, successive scholars, editors, and specialist contributors have amended and added to Harvey H. Arnason's original text, which Arnason himself fully revised some years after the book was first published in 1969. This has been a process not only of fine-tuning and updating information but also of revisiting much of Arnason's material in the context of a scholarly and educational environment that has changed significantly from the one in which he wrote. There are parallels to this process in other cultural arenas, for example in the reorganization and reinterpretation of museum and gallery displays. The core of the collection remains the same, the objects have the same indelible presence and fascination, but, juxtaposed with new acquisitions and displayed under different lighting conditions, they lead viewers to look at them in different (sometimes very different) ways. In this sense, while this new edition ofHistory of Modern Artcontains much added material, it is still essentially Arnason's creation. This Preface offers a brief investigation into the marathon staying-power of his original endeavor, even through successive revisions have seen the book evolve over the years to take account of new directions in art and art history. After more than three decades and four new editions, Arnason's vision remains the core of this standard work of art historical reference. The Art of Looking Arnason was Professor and Chairman of the University of Minnesota's art department from 1947 to 1961, and he had a long association with New York's Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum as its Vice President for Art Administration. He embarked onHistory of Modern Artrelatively late in life. The project was conceived and intended as a long-term landmark--the first book of its kind--and it drew on the experience of his distinguished career as an art historian. Two deep-rooted convictions underpin Arnason'sHistory:first, that understanding art is a matter of fundamental importance; second, that the way to learn about art is to look for yourself. His Preface unequivocally emphasized his belief in the importance of the individual's face-to-face experience of art--a belief that, as he saw it, gave the book its rationale and its structure: The thesis of this book, insofar as it has a thesis, is that in the study of art the only primary evidence is the work of art itself. Everything that has been said about it, even by the artist himself, may be important, but it remains secondary evidence. Everything that we can


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