9780130175731

A History of Modern Psychology

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780130175731

  • ISBN10:

    0130175730

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2000-06-27
  • Publisher: Pearson

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $235.40 Save up to $129.47
  • Rent Book $105.93
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Used and Rental copies of this book are not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

This book is a history of modern psychology, beginning with the publication of Fechner's elements of Psychophysics in the mid-19th century to the present. It approaches the history of psychology from a scientific perspective.Chapter topics include: the psychology of consciousness, the unconscious mind, and adaptation; the conspiracy of naturalism; the golden age and decline of behaviorism; the rise of cognitive science; the birth of applied psychology; the rise of professional psychology; and the psychological society.For individuals interested in the history of psychologyand what it is today.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
PART I Introduction 1(68)
Psychology, Science, and History
3(31)
Understanding Science
4(20)
The Image of Modern Science
4(1)
Explanation
5(4)
Theories: How Scientists Explain Things
9(4)
The Nature of Scientific Change
13(8)
Science as a Worldview
21(3)
The Scientific Challenges to Psychology
24(1)
Psychology and The Discipline of History
24(6)
History of Science
24(4)
Historiography of Psychology
28(2)
Bibliography
30(1)
References
30(4)
Laying the Foundations
34(35)
Three Eras and Two Revolutions in the Human Ways of Life
34(2)
The Origins of ``Psychology''
36(1)
The Renaissance
36(2)
The Ancients and the Moderns: The Revival of Humanism
37(1)
Renaissance Naturalism
37(1)
The Scientific Revolution
38(5)
The Transformation of Matter and the Mechanization of the World Picture
38(1)
The Transformation of Experience and the Creation of Consciousness
39(1)
Creating Psychology: Rene Descartes
39(4)
Philosophical Psychology in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
43(5)
Examining the Mind
43(4)
Examining Mind and Body
47(1)
Examining Other Minds
48(1)
Human Nature, Morality, and Society
48(3)
The Enlightenment Project
48(1)
Examining Human Nature
49(1)
The Counterenlightenment
50(1)
The Nineteenth Century: Shaping the Field of Psychology
51(6)
Central Controversies
51(6)
The Nineteenth Century: Innovations
57(8)
Neuroscience
57(2)
Methods
59(2)
Institutions
61(1)
Psychopathology
62(3)
Conclusion
65(1)
Bibliography
66(3)
PART II Founding Psychology 69(122)
The Psychology of Consciousness
71(39)
Settings
71(6)
The German University: Wissenschaft and Bildung
71(2)
German Values: The Mandarin Bildungsburger
73(4)
Wilhelm Wundt's Psychology of Consciousness
77(10)
Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920)
77(1)
Wundt's Psychology
78(5)
Wundt at Work
83(4)
After Leipzig: Other Methods, New Movements
87(16)
The Positivist Turn: Psychology as Natural Science
87(3)
Phenomenological Alternatives
90(3)
Systematic Introspection: The Wurzburg School, 1901-1909
93(4)
Scientific Phenomenology: Gestalt Psychology
97(5)
The Practical Turn: Applied Psychology
102(1)
The Fate of the Psychology of Consciousness
103(2)
Slow Growth in Germany
103(2)
Transplantation to America
105(1)
Bibliography
105(2)
References
107(3)
The Psychology of the Unconscious
110(44)
The Significance of Psychoanalysis
110(1)
Freud and Scientific Psychology
111(1)
Freud and Academic Psychology
111(1)
Freud and Experimental Method
112(1)
Structure of the Chapter
113(1)
The Formation of Psychoanalysis, 1885-1899
113(18)
Freud and Biology
113(6)
Freud the Physician: Studying Hysteria
119(6)
The Seduction Error and the Creation of Psychoanalysis
125(6)
Classical Psychoanalysis, 1900-1919
131(7)
The Founding Work: The Interpretation of Dreams (1900)
131(2)
The Classical Theory of the Instincts: Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905)
133(2)
The Classical Theory of Personality: The Topography of the Mind
135(3)
Revising and Extending Psychoanalysis
138(3)
Revisions
138(2)
Extensions
140(1)
The Fate of Psychoanalysis
141(4)
Freudian Psychoanalysis and Science
142(2)
Psychoanalysis after Freud
144(1)
The Freudian Legacy
145(1)
Bibliography
146(1)
References
147(7)
The Psychology of Adaptation
154(37)
Evolution and Psychology
154(1)
Heraclitus Triumphant: The Darwinian Revolution
155(7)
Background
155(1)
Romantic Evolution
156(1)
The Victorian Revolutionary: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)
157(3)
Reception and Influence of Evolution by Natural Selection
160(2)
The Beginnings of the Psychology of Adaptation in Britain
162(7)
Lamarckian Psychology: Herbert Spencer (1820-1903)
162(2)
Darwinian Psychology
164(5)
Functional Psychology in Europe
169(2)
James Ward (1843-1925)
169(1)
Hermann Ebbinghaus (1850-1909)
170(1)
Psychological Ideas in the New World
171(4)
General Intellectual and Social Environment
171(3)
Philosophical Psychology
174(1)
The New American Psychology
175(10)
America's Native Philosophy: Pragmatism
175(3)
America's Psychologist: William James (1842-1910)
178(7)
Establishing American Psychology
185(2)
The New Psychology and the Old
185(1)
To the Future: Perception and Thinking Are Only There for Behavior's Sake
186(1)
Bibliography
187(2)
References
189(2)
PART III A Very Different Age, 1880-1913 191(40)
The Conspiracy of Naturalism
193(18)
From Mentalism to Behavioralism
193(1)
Psychology and Society
193(7)
From Island Communities to Everywhere Communities
194(1)
the Old Psychology versus The New Psychology
195(1)
Progressivism and Psychology
196(4)
Building on James: The Motor Theory of Consciousness, 1892-1896
200(3)
Hugo Munsterberg and Action Theory
200(2)
John Dewey and the Reflex Arc
202(1)
From Philosophy to Biology: Functional Psychology, 1896-1910
203(6)
Experiments Become Functional
203(2)
Functional Psychology Defined
205(1)
From Undercurrent to Main Current
206(3)
References
209(2)
Consciousness Dissolves
211(20)
New Directions in Animal Psychology, 1898-1909
211(8)
From Anecdote to Experiment
211(6)
The Problem of Animal Mind
217(2)
Rethinking Mind: The Consciousness Debate, 1904-1912
219(6)
Does Consciousness Exist? Radical Empiricism
219(2)
The Relational Theory of Consciousness: Neorealism
221(3)
The Functional Theory of Consciousness: Instrumentalism
224(1)
Conclusion: Discarding Consciousness, 1910-1912
225(2)
Bibliography
227(2)
References
229(2)
PART IV Scientific Psychology in the Twentieth Century 231(98)
The Golden Age of Behaviorism, 1913-1950
233(28)
Behaviorism Proclaimed
233(6)
The Behaviorist Manifesto
233(3)
The Initial Response, 1913-1918
236(3)
Behaviorism Defined, 1919-1930
239(5)
The Varieties of Behaviorism
239(2)
Human or Robot?
241(1)
Later Watsonian Behaviorism
242(2)
Major Formulations of Behaviorism, 1930-1950
244(13)
Psychology and the Science of Science
245(2)
Edward Chace Tolman's Purposive Behaviorism
247(4)
Clark Leonard Hull's Mechanistic Behaviorism
251(3)
Tolman vs. Hull
254(3)
Conclusion: We're All Behaviorists Now
257(1)
References
258(3)
The Decline of Behaviorism, 1950-1960
261(32)
The Decline Begins
261(8)
Philosophical Behaviorism
262(5)
Formal Behaviorism in Peril
267(2)
B. F. Skinner (1904-1990)
269(10)
Radical Behaviorism as a Philosophy
270(1)
The Experimental Analysis of Behavior
271(5)
Interpreting Human Behavior
276(3)
Behaviorism and the Human Mind
279(3)
Informal Behaviorism
279(1)
The Concept of Mediation
280(2)
Challenges to Behaviorism
282(3)
Cartesian Linguistics
282(3)
Erosion of the Foundations
285(5)
The Disappearance of Positivism
285(1)
Constraints on Animal Learning
286(3)
Awareness and Human Learning
289(1)
References
290(3)
The Rise of Cognitive Science, 1960-2000
293(36)
Early Theories in Cognitive Psychology
293(4)
The New Structuralism
293(2)
Cognition in Social Psychology
295(1)
New Cognitive Theories of Perception and Thinking
296(1)
The Mechanization of Thought
297(3)
Artificial Intelligence
297(1)
Solving Purpose: The Concept of Feedback
298(1)
Defining Artificial Intelligence
299(1)
The Triumph of Information Processing
300(7)
The ``Cognitive Revolution''
300(5)
The Myth of the Cognitive Revolution
305(2)
The Nature of Cognitive Science
307(2)
Informavores: The Subjects of Cognitive Science
307(1)
The Minds of Informavores: The New Functionalism
307(2)
Cognitive Science at Maturity: Debates and Developments
309(14)
Uncertainties
309(1)
Debates
310(5)
Developments: The New Connectionism
315(8)
The Study of the Mind at the Beginning of the New Millennium
323(1)
Bibliography
323(2)
References
325(4)
PART V Applied Psychology in the Twentieth Century 329(72)
The Birth of Applied Psychology, 1892-1919
331(18)
Scientific, Applied, and Professional Psychology
331(1)
Origins of Applied Psychology
332(9)
Mental Testing
332(4)
Founding Applied Psychology in the United States
336(5)
Professional Psychology
341(3)
Clinical Psychology
341(2)
Organizing Professional Psychology
343(1)
Psychology Enters Public Consciousness: Psychology in the Great War
344(3)
Psychologists at War
344(2)
The Shattering Impact of World War I
346(1)
References
347(2)
The Rise of Professional Psychology, 1920-1950
349(31)
Psychologists in Social Controversy
349(8)
Psychology in the American Social Context
349(1)
Is America Safe for Democracy? The ``Menace of the Feebleminded''
349(3)
Making America Safe for Democracy: Immigration Control and Eugenics
352(5)
Psychology and Everyday Life
357(10)
Psychologists at Work
357(1)
When Psychology Was King
358(5)
Flaming Youth and the Reconstruction of the Family
363(4)
Psychologists in Professional Controversy
367(3)
Divorce: The Clinicians Walk Out
367(1)
Reconciliation in the Crucible of World War II
368(2)
Psychology in World War II
370(3)
New Prospects for Applied Psychology
370(1)
Inventing Counseling Psychology and Redefining Clinical Psychology
371(2)
Optimism in the Aftermath of War
373(4)
Contending for Respectability and Money at the Dawn of Big Science
373(2)
Psychologists Look Ahead to the Psychological Society
375(1)
Values and Adjustment
376(1)
References
377(3)
The Psychological Society, 1950-2000
380(21)
Developing the Psychological Society
380(3)
Professional Psychology in the 1950s
380(1)
Humanistic Psychology
381(2)
The Social ``Revolution'' of the 1960s
383(9)
Psychologists' Critique of American Culture
384(1)
The Myth of Mental Illness
384(1)
Humanistic Psychology and the Critique of Adjustment
385(3)
Giving Psychology Away
388(2)
Revolt, but No Revolution
390(2)
Professional Psychology
392(8)
Funding Social Science
392(2)
Clinical Psychology in the 1960s and 1970s
394(5)
Divorced Again: The Academics Walk Out
399(1)
Professional Psychology at the Beginning of the New Millennium
400(1)
Bibliography 401(3)
References 404(5)
Index 409

Excerpts

PREFACEThere has not been an edition ofA History of Modern Psychologysince 1994, while there have been two new editions ofA History of Psychologyin the same period. I have incorporated into this third edition all the relevant changes fromA History of Psychology,without reducing this book's expanded coverage of contemporary psychology.The most obvious new features of this edition are structural. I have included a new Chapter Two that summarizes the history of psychology from the Renaissance and Scientific Revolution up to the middle of the nineteenth century. In writing these chapters, I have drawn not only fromA History of Psychologybut from a paper, "Mind as scientific object: An historical-philosophical exploration," written forMind as Scientific Object(D. Johnson & C. Erneling (Eds.), Oxford University Press, in press), and two articles, "The Renaissance through the Eighteenth Century," and "The Nineteenth Century through Freud," for theAPA Encyclopedia of Psychology(Oxford University Press, 2000).Chapters 3 to 7 on the founding of psychology and the conspiracy of naturalism have been updated, the most notable change being to Chapter 4, The Psychology of the Unconscious, which is now organized temporally rather than topically. The treatment of psychology in the twentieth century has been both updated and re-organized to provide a clearer focus on each of the two strands of modern psychology: scientific psychology and professional psychology. Chapters 8 to 10 tell the story of the scientific study of the mind in the twentieth century up to about 2000. Chapters 11 to 13 tell the story of professional psychology in the same years. This structural change reflects two concerns of mine. First, in my own teaching I have found that shuttling back and forth between very different narrative strands that happen to occur in the same time period confuses students. I think the pictures of both scientific and professional psychology become clearer by telling each story separately. Secondly, as a number of observers have pointed out, scientific and professional psychology are increasingly going their separate ways despite occasional protests, and my separation of the two narratives reflects what I believe is historical reality. Finally, separating the material should make it easier for teachers to emphasize one or the other topic.As always, I would be happy to hear any comments from professors or students aboutA History of Modern Psychology,Third Edition. Please email me at tleahey@saturn.vcu.edu . THOMAS HARDY LEAHEY Richmond, Virginia

Rewards Program

Write a Review