CART

(0) items

A History And Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education: From Ancient Civilizations to the Modern World,9780072973020
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

A History And Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education: From Ancient Civilizations to the Modern World

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780072973020

ISBN10:
0072973021
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/21/2005
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 7/21/2005.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Related Products


  • A History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education: From Ancient Civilizations to the Modern World
    A History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education: From Ancient Civilizations to the Modern World
  • A History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education: From Ancient Civilizations to the Modern World
    A History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education: From Ancient Civilizations to the Modern World
  • History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education with PowerWeb : Health and Human Performance
    History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education with PowerWeb : Health and Human Performance





Summary

This engaging and informative text will hold the attention of students and scholars as they take a journey through time to understand the role that history and philosophy have played in shaping the course of sport and physical education in Western and selected non-Western civilizations. Using appropriate theoretical and interpretive frameworks, students will investigate topics such as the historical relationship between mind and body; what philosophers and intellectuals have said about the body as a source of knowledge; educational philosophy and the value of physical education and/or sport; philosophical positions that have impacted the historical development of sport and physical education; the history of women in sport and physical education; the role and scope of sport and physical education in Ancient Greece and Rome; the Ancient Olympic Games; the relationship between sport and religion in ancient and modern times; the theoretical and professional development of physical education; the rise of sport in modern America; the history and politics of the modern Olympic Games; and the contributions of men, women, and social movements to the development of sport and physical education from ancient times to the modern era.

Table of Contents

Preface xii
SECTION I Ancient Civilizations
1(98)
History and Philosophy in Sport and Physical Education
2(24)
Definitions
4(3)
``Doing'' History
7(4)
Interpretive Versus Descriptive History
8(1)
Modernization
9(1)
Urbanization and Industrialization
10(1)
Metaphysics
11(1)
Philosophical Processes
11(4)
Basic Philosophical Terms
13(1)
Metaphysics and Ontology
13(1)
Metaphysical Dualism
14(1)
Epistemology
15(1)
From Dualism to Monism in the Western World
15(6)
The Mind--Body Relationship
15(1)
Philosophies of the Modern World
16(5)
Summary
21(1)
Discussion Questions
22(1)
Internet Resources
22(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
23(1)
Notes
23(3)
Sumer, Egypt, China, and Mesoamerica
26(18)
General Events
26(1)
Introduction
27(2)
Sumer
29(3)
Egypt
32(4)
China
36(2)
Mesoamerica
38(3)
Summary
41(1)
Discussion Questions
41(1)
Internet Resources
41(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
42(1)
Notes
42(2)
Greece
44(30)
General Events
44(1)
Introduction
45(1)
The Influence of the Jews and the Phoenicians upon Greek Culture
46(2)
Philosophical Positions of the Body
48(1)
Dualism
48(1)
Classical Humanism
49(1)
Socrates' and Plato's View of the Body
49(2)
Socrates' and Plato's View of Physical Education
51(2)
Education Through the Physical Versus Education of the Physical
53(2)
Aristotle
55(1)
Historical Foundations of Sport and Physical Education
55(2)
Arete and Agon
56(1)
Funeral Games
57(1)
The Influence of Crete
57(1)
Some Historical Perspectives on the Development of Greek Sport
58(1)
Athens and Sparta: A Tale of Two City-States
59(4)
Two Views on Physical Education
59(2)
Athenian Physical Education
61(1)
Athletic Participation of Greek Women
62(1)
The Ancient Olympic Games
63(6)
Summary
69(1)
Discussion Questions
70(1)
Internet Resources
71(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
71(1)
Notes
72(2)
Rome
74(25)
General Events
74(1)
Introduction
75(1)
The Etruscans
76(3)
Nero
79(1)
Cross-Cultural Analysis of the Greeks and Romans
80(1)
Philosophical Orientation
80(3)
The Stoics
81(1)
The Epicureans
82(1)
Marcus Tullius Cicero
82(1)
Antiochus
82(1)
Sport and Physical Education
83(1)
Military Training
83(1)
Claudius Galen
84(1)
Greek Athletics
85(1)
Women and Sport
85(1)
Games and Spectacles
86(6)
Sport and Christianity
92(1)
Greek Reaction to the Introduction of Roman Sport
93(1)
Summary
93(1)
Discussion Questions
94(1)
Internet Resources
94(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
94(1)
Notes
95(4)
SECTION II From the Spiritual World to the Secular World: Changing Concepts of the Body
99(86)
Philosophy, Sport, and Physical Education During the Middle Ages: 900--1400
100(17)
General Events
100(1)
Introduction
101(1)
The Impact of Christianity
101(2)
Christianity and Greek Philosophy
103(1)
Philosophical Views of the Body in the Middle Ages
104(2)
The Body and Physical Fitness According to St. Thomas Aquinas
106(1)
Moses Maimonides and St. Bonaventure
107(1)
Linking the Spiritual with Secular Sport
107(1)
Holidays and Ball Games
108(1)
Rugged Ball Games, Equestrian Events, and English Football
109(1)
Medieval Social Structure: Knights, Nobles, and Worthy Pursuits
110(1)
Sport of the Aristocracy
111(1)
Medieval Tournaments
111(1)
Hawking, Hunting, and Other Pastimes
112(1)
Medieval Concepts of Health and Hygiene: Galen Revisited
112(1)
Summary
113(1)
Discussion Questions
114(1)
Internet Resources
114(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
114(1)
Notes
115(2)
The Renaissance and the Reformation: 1300--1600
117(19)
General Events
117(1)
Introduction
118(1)
Cultural Changes of the Renaissance
118(2)
The Reformation
120(1)
The Philosophers and Educators of the Renaissance
121(4)
Petrus Paulus Vergerius
123(1)
Vittorino da Feltre
123(2)
Aeneas Silvio Piccolomini
125(1)
Baldassare Castiglione
125(1)
The Philosophers and Educators of the Reformation
125(8)
William of Ockham
127(1)
Desiderius Erasmus
128(1)
Martin Luther
128(2)
John Calvin
130(1)
Thomas Elyot
131(2)
Roger Ascham
133(1)
Summary
133(1)
Discussion Questions
134(1)
Internet Resources
134(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
135(1)
Notes
135(1)
The Age of Science and the Enlightenment: 1560--1789
136(23)
General Events
136(1)
Introduction
137(3)
The Age of Science: 1560--1688
137(2)
The Enlightenment: 1688--1789
139(1)
The Philosophers of Science
140(2)
Galileo Galilei
141(1)
Francis Bacon
141(1)
Isaac Newton
142(1)
The Philosophers
142(4)
Thomas Hobbes
143(1)
Rene Descartes
144(1)
George Berkeley
145(1)
The Educators
146(3)
Francois Rabelais
146(1)
Richard Mulcaster
147(1)
Michel de Montaigne
147(1)
John Comenius
148(1)
John Milton
148(1)
John Locke
148(1)
The Philosophes and Physical Educators
149(6)
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
150(3)
Johann Bernhard Basedow
153(1)
Johann Friedrich GutsMuths
154(1)
Summary
155(1)
Discussion Questions
155(1)
Internet Resources
156(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
156(1)
Notes
156(3)
Philosophical Positions of the Body and the Development of Physical Education: Contributions of the Germans, Swedes, and Danes in Nineteenth-Century Europe
159(26)
General Events
159(1)
Introduction
160(1)
Idealism
160(2)
The Self
161(1)
Knowledge
161(1)
The German Idealists: Kant, Fichte, and Hegel
162(4)
Immanuel Kant
162(3)
Johann Fichte
165(1)
Georg Hegel
165(1)
The Application of Idealism to Physical Education
166(2)
Students
167(1)
Values
167(1)
Objectives
167(1)
Curriculum
167(1)
Evaluation Criteria
168(1)
The Educators
168(12)
Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi
168(2)
Friedrich Wilhelm August Froebel
170(1)
Friedrich Ludwig John
171(4)
Charles Follen
175(1)
Charles Beck
176(1)
Francis Lieber
176(1)
Franz Nachtegall
176(3)
Per Henrik Ling
179(1)
Summary
180(1)
Discussion Questions
181(1)
Internet Resources
181(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
182(1)
Notes
182(3)
SECTION III The Theoretical and Professional Development of American Physical Education
185(44)
The Impact of Science and the Concept of Health on the Theoretical and Professional Development of Physical Education, 1885--1930
186(25)
General Events
186(1)
Introduction
187(1)
Social and Institutional Change in Nineteenth-Century America
188(2)
The Theoretical Basis of American Physical Education
190(4)
Three Distinct Periods
191(1)
Biological and Philosophical Issues
192(1)
Evolution
193(1)
The Disease---Neurasthenia; the Cure---Exercise!
194(1)
Exercising to Build Brain Power
194(1)
Women: Mothers of the Race
195(1)
Women, Higher Education, and Physical Education
196(1)
The Golden Age of Anthropometric Measurement: 1885--1900
197(1)
Defining the Scope of the Discipline
198(1)
The Contributions of German Gymnastics, Dio Lewis, and the Swedish System to Teacher Training
199(2)
Physical Education the American Way
201(1)
Changing Concepts of Health
201(1)
A Changing Profession
202(1)
The Professional Preparation of Teachers
202(4)
Summary
206(1)
Discussion Questions
207(1)
Internet Resources
207(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
208(1)
Notes
208(3)
The Transformation of Physical Education: 1900--1939
211(18)
General Events
211(1)
The Transformation of Physical Education and the Adoption of Sports Programs
212(3)
The Development of Play Theory: 1900--1915
215(2)
Herbert Spencer and William James
215(1)
Karl Groos
216(1)
G. Stanley Hall
216(1)
Luther Halsey Gulick
217(1)
John Dewey
217(1)
Advocates and Adversaries: The Promotion of Play
217(1)
Play and Popular Culture
218(1)
Play Versus Gymnastics
218(1)
Play in Physical Education: 1900--1915
219(1)
The Paradigmatic Basis of the New Physical Education: 1916--1930
220(1)
The Architects of the New Physical Education: Clark Hetherington, Thomas D. Wood, and Rosalind Cassidy
220(1)
Components and Goals of Physical Education
220(1)
Promotion of Physical Education
221(1)
Physical Education Literature in the Early Twentieth Century
222(1)
Science and the Quantification of Physical Education
222(2)
Tests and Measurements
222(1)
The Relationship Between Physical Ability and Mental Ability
222(1)
Physical Fitness Assessment
223(1)
Summary
224(1)
Discussion Questions
225(1)
Internet Resources
225(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
226(1)
Notes
226(3)
SECTION IV The Historical and Philosophical Development of Sport in America
229(56)
Sport in the Colonial Period
230(11)
General Events
230(1)
Introduction
231(1)
Sport in England: A Tale of Two Cultures
231(2)
Sport in New England: The Puritans
233(2)
Amusements in New England
235(1)
Sport in the Mid-Atlantic Region
235(1)
Sport in the South
236(2)
Contributions of Native Americans
238(1)
Summary
238(1)
Discussion Questions
239(1)
Internet Resources
239(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
240(1)
Notes
240(1)
Changing Concepts of the Body: An Overview of Sport and Play in Nineteenth-Century America
241(25)
General Events
241(1)
Introduction
242(1)
Early Technological Innovations and Their Impact on Sport
243(1)
Nineteenth-Century American Philosophy: Transcendentalism and Pragmatism
243(2)
Ralph Waldo Emerson
244(1)
Henry David Thoreau
244(1)
Pragmatism
245(1)
The Influence of Charles Darwin
245(1)
The Pragmatists
246(2)
Charles Sanders Peirce
247(1)
William James
247(1)
Sport in the Nineteenth Century
248(1)
Justifying Sport in the Nineteenth Century
248(2)
Religion as an Argument for Sport
248(1)
Other Arguments That Justified Sport Participation
249(1)
Development of Sport in the Nineteenth Century
250(2)
Sport and Play in Nineteenth-Century America
252(10)
Horse and Harness Racing
252(3)
Ball Games: Cricket, Baseball, and Football
255(5)
``Amateur'' Sports
260(2)
Summary
262(1)
Discussion Questions
262(1)
Internet Resources
263(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
263(1)
Notes
264(2)
Sport in the Twentieth Century
266(19)
General Events
266(1)
Introduction
267(1)
College Football
268(4)
Professional Football
272(1)
Baseball
273(1)
Basketball
274(2)
Boxing
276(1)
Volleyball
277(1)
Women and Sport
277(4)
Summary
281(1)
Discussion Questions
282(1)
Internet Resources
282(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
283(1)
Notes
283(2)
SECTION V A Social and Political History of the Modern Olympic Games
285(122)
Pioneers and Progress: 1896--1936
286(29)
Introduction
287(1)
The Architects of the Modern Olympic Games: Dr. William Penny Brookes and Baron Pierre de Coubertin
288(4)
The Ist Olympiad: Athens, 1896
292(1)
The IInd Olympiad: Paris, 1900
293(1)
The IIIrd Olympiad: St. Louis, 1904
294(2)
The IVth Olympiad: London, 1908
296(2)
The Vth Olympiad: Stockholm, 1912
298(2)
The VIIth Olympiad: Antwerp, 1920
300(2)
The VIIIth Olympiad: Paris, 1924
302(1)
The Ist Winter Olympics: Chamonix, 1924
303(1)
The IXth Olympiad: Amsterdam, 1928
303(1)
The IInd Winter Olympics: St. Moritz, 1928
304(1)
The Issue of Amateurism
304(1)
The Xth Olympiad: Los Angeles, 1932
305(1)
The IIIrd Winter Olympics: Lake Placid, 1932
305(1)
The Political Nature of the Olympic Games
306(1)
The XIth Olympiad: Berlin, 1936
306(5)
Sport and Physical Education in Nazi Germany
307(4)
The IVth Winter Olympics: Garmisch--Partenkirchen, 1936
311(1)
Summary
311(1)
Discussion Questions
312(1)
Internet Resources
312(1)
Notes
313(2)
The Cold War Olympics: 1948--1988
315(53)
Introduction
317(1)
The XIVth Olympiad: London, 1948
318(3)
The Political Atmosphere
318(2)
Notables
320(1)
The Vth Winter Olympics: St. Moritz, 1948
321(4)
The XVth Olympiad: Helsinki, 1952
321(1)
The Political Atmosphere
321(2)
A Cold War of Sports
323(1)
A Propaganda War
324(1)
Notables
324(1)
The VIth Winter Olympics: Oslo, 1952
325(1)
The XVIth Olympiad: Melbourne, 1956
325(4)
The Political Atmosphere
325(2)
The Aussie Olympics
327(1)
Olympic Boycott
327(1)
Notables
328(1)
The VIIth Winter Olympics: Cortina, 1956
329(1)
The XVIIth Olympiad: Rome, 1960
329(4)
The Political Atmosphere
329(1)
A Roman Holiday
330(1)
East Versus West
330(2)
Notables
332(1)
The VIIIth Winter Olympics: Squaw Valley, 1960
333(1)
The XVIIIth Olympiad: Tokyo, 1964
333(3)
The Perfect Olympiad
334(1)
Olympic Politics
334(2)
Defections
336(1)
Notables
336(1)
The IXth Winter Olympics: Innsbruck, 1964
336(1)
The XIXth Olympiad: Mexico City, 1968
337(3)
Student Demonstrations
337(1)
Olympic Politics
338(2)
The Xth Winter Olympics: Grenoble, 1968
340(1)
The XXth Olympiad: Munich, 1972
340(5)
World Overview
340(1)
Olympic Politics
341(1)
The Munich Massacre
342(2)
Notables
344(1)
The XIth Winter Olympics: Sapporo, 1972
345(1)
The XXIst Olympiad: Montreal, 1976
345(5)
The Taiwan Issue
345(2)
The Boycott
347(1)
Security Concerns
348(1)
Political Defections and Propaganda
348(1)
Notables
349(1)
The XIIth Winter Olympics: Innsbruck, 1976
350(1)
The XXIInd Olympiad: Moscow, 1980
350(5)
What Led to the U.S. Boycott? The Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan
351(1)
Athletes as Political Pawns
352(2)
Presidential Pressure and Promises
354(1)
Epilogue
354(1)
Notables
355(1)
The XIIIth Winter Olympics: Lake Placid, 1980
355(1)
The XXIIIrd Olympiad: Los Angeles, 1984
356(3)
The Political Atmosphere
357(1)
What Goes Around, Comes Around: The Soviet Boycott of the XXIIIrd Olympiad
357(1)
Security Concerns
358(1)
Notables
358(1)
The XIVth Winter Olympics: Sarajevo, 1984
359(1)
The XXIVth Olympiad: Seoul, 1988
359(3)
Security Concerns and Olympic Politics
360(1)
NBC Versus South Korea
360(1)
Banning Performance-Enhancing Drugs and Other Illicit Drugs at the Olympics
360(1)
The Ultimate Incentive
361(1)
Notables
361(1)
The XVth Winter Olympics: Calgary, 1988
362(1)
Economics
362(1)
Atmosphere
363(1)
Notables
363(1)
Summary
363(1)
Discussion Questions
364(1)
Internet Resources
364(1)
Notes
365(3)
After the Cold War: 1992--2004
368(39)
Introduction
369(1)
The XXVth Olympiad: Barcelona, 1992
370(1)
A Renewed Olympic Spirit
370(1)
Notables
371(1)
The XVIth Winter Olympics: Albertville/Savoie, 1992
371(2)
Economics
372(1)
Atmosphere
372(1)
Notables
372(1)
The XVIIth Winter Olympics: Lillehammer, 1994
373(1)
Atmosphere
373(1)
Notables
373(1)
The Centennial Olympiad: Atlanta, 1996
374(5)
The Torch Relay
375(1)
The Opening Ceremonies
375(1)
Commercialization
375(1)
Drugs
376(1)
The Closing Ceremonies
377(1)
Notables
377(2)
The XVIIIth Winter Olympics: Nagano, 1998
379(2)
Milestones
379(1)
Goals and Outcomes
380(1)
Notables
380(1)
Scandals and Ill-Gotten Gains
381(1)
The XXVIIth Olympiad: Sydney, 2000
382(9)
Social Protests
383(1)
Terrorist Threats
384(1)
Politics
384(1)
The Tape-Delayed Olympics---Thank You, NBC!
385(1)
Economics and Attendant Social Issues
385(3)
Technology
388(1)
Doping
388(1)
Notables
389(2)
The XIX Winter Olympics: Salt Lake City, 2002
391(5)
The Political Atmosphere
391(1)
Security Concerns
392(1)
Drugs
393(1)
Philosophical Concerns and Legal Interpretations
393(1)
Ethical Decisions and the Decline of an Idea: Exercise in Critical Thinking
394(1)
Notables
395(1)
The XXVIII Olympiad: Athens, 2004
396(7)
The Political Atmosphere
396(2)
The Game Plan
398(1)
Ethical Dilemmas
398(1)
Logistics and Security Concerns
399(1)
Doping
400(1)
Notables
401(2)
Summary
403(1)
Discussion Questions
404(1)
Internet Resources
405(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
405(1)
Notes
405(2)
Credits 407(1)
Index 408


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...