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A History Of Roman Art,9780534638467
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A History Of Roman Art

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780534638467

ISBN10:
0534638465
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/30/2006
Publisher(s):
Cengage Learning
List Price: $175.66

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This is the 1st edition with a publication date of 1/30/2006.
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Summary

A HISTORY OF ROMAN ART is a new authoritative and lavishly-illustrated survey of the art of Rome and the Roman Empire from the time of Romulus to the death of Constantine, presented in its historical, political, and social context. All aspects of Roman art and architecture are treated, including private art and domestic architecture, the art of the Eastern and Western provinces, the art of freedmen, and the so-called minor arts, including cameos, silverware, and coins. The book is divided into four parts?Monarchy and Republic, Early Empire, High Empire, and Late Empire?and traces the development of Roman art from its beginnings in the 8th century BCE to the mid fourth century CE, with special chapters devoted to Pompeii and Herculaneum, Ostia, funerary and provincial art and architecture, and the earliest Christian art.

Table of Contents

About the Author vii
About the Cover Art ix
Preface xvii
Part One Monarchy and Republic
From Village to World Capital
1(16)
Rome under the Kings
2(5)
Rome and Latium under the Republic
7(8)
Summary
15(2)
Religion and Mythology: Roman Gods and Goddesses
4(2)
Architectural Basics: Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian
6(6)
Architectural Basics: Arches, Barrel Vaults, and Concrete
12(5)
Republican Town Planning and Pompeii
17(14)
Town Planning
17(2)
Pompeii
19(10)
Summary
29(2)
Written Sources: An Eyewitness Account of the Eruption of Mount Vesuvius
20(4)
Art and Society: An Afternoon at the Baths
24(7)
Republican Domestic Architecture and Mural Painting
31(16)
Domestic Architecture
31(8)
Mural Painting
39(6)
Summary
45(2)
Art and Society: The Social Structure of the Roman House
32(9)
Materials and Techniques: Roman Mural Painting
41(6)
From Marcellus to Caesar
47(14)
Roman Generals and Greek Art
47(5)
Portraiture
52(4)
Pompey and Caesar
56(3)
Summary
59(2)
Who's Who in the Roman World: Republican Senators, Consuls, and Generals
48(1)
Written Sources: Marcellus, Syracuse, and the Craze for Greek Art
49(5)
Written Sources: Ancestor Portraits
54(7)
Part Two The Early Empire
The Augustan Principate
61(18)
Caesar's Heir
61(5)
Portraiture
66(4)
The Pax Augusta
70(3)
Mural Painting
73(4)
Summary
77(2)
Who's Who in the Roman World: The Family of Augustus
62(1)
Art and Society: The Roman Imperial Coinage
63(4)
Written Sources: The Res Gestae of the Deified Augustus
67(12)
Preparing for the Afterlife during the Early Empire
79(10)
Funerary Architecture
79(3)
Funerary Sculpture
82(5)
Summary
87(2)
Written Sources: The Tomb of Trimalchio
85(4)
The Pax Augusta in the West
89(14)
Aqueducts
89(3)
Arches and Gates
92(4)
Temples, Theaters, and Amphitheaters
96(3)
Funerary Monuments
99(2)
Summary
101(2)
Architectural Basics: Roman Aqueducts
91(6)
Religion and Mythology: The Imperial Cult
97(6)
The Julio-Claudian Dynasty
103(18)
Tiberius
103(5)
Caligula
108(1)
Claudius
109(6)
Nero
115(4)
Summary
119(2)
Who's Who in the Roman World: The Julio-Claudians
104(13)
Written Sources: The Golden House of Nero
117(1)
Architectural Basics: The Dome
118(3)
Civil War, the Flavians, and Nerva
121(18)
Portraiture
121(5)
Architecture
126(8)
Damnatio Memoriae and Nerva
134(3)
Summary
137(2)
Who's Who in the Roman World: Civil War, the Flavians, and Nerva
122(6)
Art and Society: Spectacles in the Colosseum
128(3)
Written Sources: The Triumph of Vespasian and Titus
131(5)
Art and Society: Rewriting History: Damnation Memoriae
136(3)
Pompeii and Herculaneum in the First Century CE
139(14)
Domestic Architecture
139(7)
Mural Painting
146(5)
Summary
151(2)
Written Sources: Excavating Herculaneum
140(11)
Materials and Techniques: The Roman Illustrated Book
151(2)
Part Three The High Empire
Trajan, Optimus Princeps
153(18)
Portraiture
153(3)
Architecture and Relief Sculpture
156(13)
Summary
169(2)
Who's Who in the Roman World: The Family of Trajan
154(1)
Written Sources: Pliny the Younger's Panegyric to Trajan
155(5)
Architectural Basics: Buildings on Coins
160(4)
Architectural Basics: The Groin Vault
164(7)
Hadrian, the Philhellene
171(16)
Portraiture
171(4)
Relief Sculpture
175(3)
Architecture
178(7)
Summary
185(2)
Who's Who in the Roman World: Hadrian, Sabina, and Antinous
172(1)
Written Sources: The Biography of Hadrian
173(7)
Written Sources: Hadrian and Apollodorus of Damascus
180(7)
The Antonines
187(16)
Portraiture
187(7)
Architecture and Architectural Sculpture
194(7)
Summary
201(2)
Who's Who in the Roman World: The Antonines
188(7)
Art and Society: Imperial Funerals
195(6)
Written Sources: The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius
201(2)
Ostia, Port and Mirror of Rome
203(14)
Public Architecture
203(5)
Domestic Architecture
208(2)
Funerary Architecture
210(5)
Summary
215(2)
Materials and Techniques: Roman Mosaics
207(3)
Art and Society: Life in the City during the High Empire
210(7)
Burying the Dead during the High Empire
217(14)
Mythological Sarcophagi
217(7)
Battle and Biographical Sarcophagi
224(3)
Egyptian Mummies
227(2)
Summary
229(2)
Materials and Techniques: Roman Regional Sarcophagus Production
218(3)
Religion and Mythology: Greek Myths on Roman Sarcophagi
221(7)
Materials and Techniques: laia of Cyzicus and the Art of Encaustic Painting
228(3)
Part Four The Late Empire
The Severan Dynasty
231(16)
Portraiture
232(5)
Architecture and Relief Sculpture
237(8)
Summary
245(2)
Who's Who in the Roman World: Pertinax and the Severan Dynasty
232(5)
Architectural Basics: The Forma Urbis Romae
237(7)
Religion and Mythology: Oriental Gods in Severan Rome
244(3)
Lepcis Magna and the Eastern Provinces
247(16)
Severan Lepcis Magna
247(5)
Asia Minor and North Africa
252(4)
The Near East
256(5)
Summary
261(2)
Religion and Mythology: Polytheism and Monotheism at Dura-Europos
259(4)
The Soldier Emperors
263(16)
Portraiture
264(6)
Sarcophagi
270(7)
Architecture
277(1)
Summary
277(2)
Who's Who in the Roman World: The Soldier Emperors
264(4)
Art and Society: The Heroic Ideal in the Third Century
268(11)
The Tetrarchy
279(12)
Portraiture
279(3)
Architecture and Relief Sculpture
282(7)
Summary
289(2)
Who's Who in the Roman World: The Tetrarchy
280(11)
Constantine, Emperor and Christian Patron
291(16)
Portraiture
291(3)
Architecture and Relief Sculpture
294(5)
Early Christian Art and Architecture
299(7)
Summary
306(1)
Who's Who in the Roman World: The Age of Constantine
292(7)
Written Sources: Constantine and Old Saint Peter's
299(4)
Religion and Mythology: The Subjects of Early Christian Art
303(4)
Glossary 307(8)
Bibliography 315(6)
Credits 321(4)
Index 325


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