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History of the Roman People, A

by ; ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780138965983

ISBN10:
0138965986
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/1999
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
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Summary

This text is appropriate for a survey course on Roman History. Having undergone a thorough revision to incorporate the latest and most insightful research, this reader-friendly survey of Roman history embarks students on a fascinating journey from prehistoric Italy to the death of Maurice (602 A.D.)it takes into account new archaeological evidence, advances in historical demography, and recently excavated and restudied artifacts to shed new light on our understanding of the origins and early development of Rome. Centered around a traditional political and military narrative, it presents in-depth coverage of Roman social, economic, and cross-cultural developments. Cross-references are made throughout. Supporting evidence and up-to-date explanations based on the evidence of current scholarship are emphasized.

Table of Contents

Preface xvii
PART ONE PRE-ROMAN ITALY AND THE RISE OF ROME 1(82)
I The Foundations of Early Rome and Italy
1(10)
Geography
1(2)
The Site of Rome
3(1)
The Peoples of Pre-Roman Italy
4(3)
The Peoples of Italy, ca. 750 B.C. to 400 B.C.
7(4)
II Etruscans and Greeks in Pre-Roman Italy
11(12)
The Land of the Etruscans
11(1)
Sources for Etruscan History
12(1)
Etruscan Origins
12(1)
Etruscan Economy
13(1)
Etruscan Cities and Sociopolitical Organization
13(1)
Women and the Etruscan Family
14(1)
Etruscan Culture and Religion
14(2)
Etruscan Art and Architecture
16(3)
The Fate of the Etruscans
19(2)
The Greeks in Italy
21(1)
Decline of the Greek Cities in Italy and Sicily
22(1)
III Early Rome to 500 B.C.
23(12)
The Ancient Literary Tradition and Its Sources
23(2)
Reconstructing Early Roman History
25(4)
The Early Roman State
29(6)
IV Early Roman Society, Religion, and Values
35(15)
The Principle of Hierarchy
35(1)
The Family
35(4)
Patrons and Clients
39(1)
Slaves and Freedmen
39(1)
Roman Names and the Gens
40(1)
Patrician and Nonpatrician Gentes
41(1)
The Openness of Early Roman Society to Outsiders
41(1)
Early Roman Religion
42(4)
The State and Religion
46(1)
The Values of Early Roman Society
47(3)
V The Rise of the Roman Republic, 509 to 287 B.C.
50(19)
Sources of Information for Early Republican History
50(1)
From Kingship to Republic
51(2)
The Early Republican Constitution
53(2)
The Priesthoods and Priestly Colleges
55(2)
Social and Political Conflicts, 509 to 287 B.C.
57(1)
Growing Plebeian Self-Consciousness and Political Organization
58(1)
The Decemvirs and the Laws of the Twelve Tables
59(1)
Post-Decemviral Developments
60(2)
A New Period of Reform
62(2)
The Creation of a New Nobility and Further Changes in the Magistracies
64(2)
The Realities of the Roman Republican Constitution after 287 B.C.
66(3)
VI The Roman Conquest of Italy and Its Impact, 509 to 264 B.C.
69(14)
Conflicts with Immediate Neighbors
69(2)
The Gallic Sack of Rome
71(1)
Up from the Ashes
72(1)
Initial Conquests in Central Italy
73(1)
The Roman System of Alliances and Citizen Communities
74(1)
The Final Conquest of Central Italy
75(2)
The Pyrrhic Wars and the Conquest of Southern Italy
77(1)
Reasons for Roman Success in Italy
78(1)
The Economic and Cultural Position of Rome in Italy by 264 B.C.
78(3)
Literature
81(2)
PART TWO THE HIGH POINT OF THE ROMAN REPUBLIC 83(63)
VII The First Punic War and the Beginning of Overseas Imperialism, 264 to 241 B.C.
83(8)
Sources for Roman History from 264 to 133 B.C.
84(1)
A New Chapter in Rome's Expansion
84(1)
Carthage
84(2)
Outbreak of the First Punic War in 264 B.C.
86(1)
Causes of the War
87(1)
Initial Carthaginian Setbacks, 263 and 262 B.C.
87(1)
Expansion of the War
87(1)
A Titanic Struggle, 260 to 241 B.C.
88(2)
Roman Peace Terms, 241 B.C.
90(1)
VIII Between the Wars, 241 to 218 B.C.
91(8)
The Truceless War and Roman Trickery, 241 B.C.
91(1)
Carthaginian Recovery
92(1)
The Ebro Treaty
92(1)
Roman Problems after 241 B.C.
92(1)
Provincial Governors
93(1)
The Praetor Peregrinus
94(1)
An International System of Law
94(1)
Gaius Flaminius and the Problems of Reform
94(1)
The Gallic Wars and Conquest of Northern Italy, 225 to 222 B.C.
95(1)
The Reform of the Centuriate Assembly
95(1)
Other Reforms of the Period
95(1)
The Illyrian Wars, 229 to 228 and 220 to 219 B.C.
96(1)
Further Developments in Spain
97(2)
IX The Second Punic War, 218 to 201 B.C.
99(9)
Causes of the Second Punic War
99(1)
Hannibal's War Strategy
100(1)
Roman War Plans
100(1)
Hannibal's March to the Alps
100(1)
Hannibal's Early Victories, 218 and 217 B.C.
101(1)
Fabius Maximus, Cunctator, 217 B.C.
102(1)
The Battle of Cannae, 216 B.C.
103(1)
The Roman Recovery
103(1)
The First Macedonian War, 215 to 205 B.C.
104(1)
The War in Spain, 218 to 211 B.C.
104(1)
Scipio Africanus
104(1)
The Battle at the Metaurus and Death of Hasdrubal, 207 B.C.
105(1)
The End Approaches
105(1)
The Battle of Zama (Naraggara), 202 B.C.
106(1)
Peace Terms
106(1)
Reasons for Roman Success
106(1)
The Fate of Hannibal
106(2)
X War and Imperialism in the Hellenistic East, 200 to 133 B.C.
108(10)
The Background of Roman Expansion in the East
108(1)
Antiochus III of Syria and Philip V of Macedon
109(1)
The Second Macedonian War, 200 to 196 B.C.
110(2)
The Aggressions of Antiochus the Great, 196 to 192 B.C.
112(1)
The War with Antiochus III, 192 to 189 B.C.
113(1)
Antiochus Offers Peace Terms
113(1)
The Aftermath
114(1)
The Third Macedonian War, 171 to 167 B.C.
114(1)
The Fourth Macedonian War, 149 to 148 B.C.
115(1)
Greece after Pydna, 168 B.C.
115(1)
Rhodes and Pergamum
116(1)
The Seleucid Monarchy
116(1)
The Jewish Revolt of the Maccabees
116(1)
Review of Roman Imperialism in the East, 200 to 133 B.C.
117(1)
XI Roman Imperialism in the West, 200 to 133 B.C.
118(6)
Northern Italy
118(1)
The Subjugation of Spain
119(1)
The Third Punic War, 149 to 146 B.C.
120(2)
The Viriathic and Numantine Wars in Spain, 151 to 133 B.C.
122(2)
XII The Transformation of Roman Life, 264 to 133 B.C.
124(12)
Agriculture
124(2)
The Growth of Industry, Trade, and Commerce
126(1)
Rising Social Discontent
127(4)
The Advancement of Upper-Class Women
131(1)
Political Developments
131(5)
XIII The Great Cultural Synthesis, 264 to 133 B.C.
136(10)
Architecture and Art
136(1)
Literature
137(1)
Specialization after Ennius
138(2)
Prose Literature
140(2)
Philosophy
142(1)
Law
143(1)
Religion
144(1)
Education
145(1)
PART THREE THE WORLD OF THE LATE REPUBLIC 146(100)
XIV The Gracchi and the Struggle over Land Reform, 133 to 121 B.C.
146(10)
Sources for the Period of the Gracchi, 133 to 121 B.C.
146(1)
The Lack of Military Recruits
146(1)
The Tribuneship of Tiberius Gracchus, 133 B.C.
147(1)
Tiberius' Motives
148(2)
The Land Commission and Its Impact
150(1)
Rome's Allies and the Death of Scipio
151(1)
Gaius Gracchus, Tribune of the Plebs, 123 to 122 B.C.
152(1)
The Reforms of Gaius Gracchus
152(2)
Livius Drusus
154(1)
The Fall and Death of Gaius Gracchus
155(1)
XV The Breakdown of the System, 121 to 88 B.C.
156(11)
Sources for the Period from 121 to 88 B.C.
156(1)
Populares and Optimates
157(1)
The Senatus Consultum Ultimum
158(1)
Post-Gracchan Land Legislation
158(1)
Colonization
158(1)
The Jugurthine War and the Rise of Gaius Marius, 111 to 106 B.C.
159(3)
The Political Fall of Marius
162(2)
A Decade of Optimate Reaction
164(1)
The Italian or Social War, 90 to 88 B.C.
164(1)
The Aftermath of the Social War
165(2)
XVI Marius and Sulla: Civil War and Reaction, 88 to 78 B.C.
167(8)
Sources for the Years 88 to 78 B.C.
167(1)
Mithridates VI Eupator (134 to 63 B.C.)
167(1)
The Rise of Sulla (138 to 78 B.C.)
168(1)
Cinna's Consulship, 87 B.C.
169(1)
Marius and His Reign of Terror
169(1)
The Significance of Marius
170(1)
Cinna's Time (Cinnanum Tempus)
170(1)
Sulla and Mithridates, 87 to 85 B.C.
170(1)
Sulla's Return to Italy, 83 to 82 B.C.
171(1)
Sulla's Reign of Terror, 82 B.C.
171(1)
Sulla's Dictatorship and Changes in the Constitution
172(1)
The Failure of Sulla
173(2)
XVII Personal Ambitions and Public Crises, 78 to 60 B.C.
175(15)
Sources for Roman History from 78 to 30 B.C.
175(1)
The Rebellion of Lepidus, 78 B.C.
176(1)
The War against Sertorius (ca. 122 to 73 B.C.)
176(1)
The Rise of Pompey the Great (106 to 48 B.C.)
177(1)
Lucullus and the Great (Third) Mithridatic War, 74 to 63 B.C.
177(1)
Spartacus and the Slave War in Italy, 73 to 71 B.C.
178(1)
Marcus Licinius Crassus (ca. 115 to 53 B.C.)
179(1)
The Consulship of Pompey and Crassus, 70 B.C.
180(1)
The Trial of Gaius Verres, 70 B.C.
180(1)
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 to 43 B.C.)
180(1)
Caesar (100 to 44 B.C.)
181(1)
Opportunistic Tribunes
182(1)
Pompey's Commissions against the Pirates and Mithridates, 67 and 66 B.C.
182(1)
Pompey's Conquest of the East, 66 to 62 B.C.
183(1)
The Maneuverings of Crassus and Caesar
184(2)
The Catilinarian Conspiracy, 63 B.C.
186(1)
Cicero's Hopes for the Future
186(1)
The Reaction against Pompey
187(3)
XVIII The Rise of Caesar, 60 to 52 B.C.
190(8)
The So-Called First Triumvirate
190(1)
Caesar's Legislation
191(1)
P. Clodius Pulcher and the Banishment of Cicero, 58 B.C.
192(1)
Caesar in Gaul
193(2)
The Political Situation in Rome, 58 to 56 B.C.
195(1)
The Gallic Wars Continued, 56 to 52 B.C.
196(2)
XIX Caesar Wins and Is Lost, Mid-50s to 44 B.C.
198(11)
The Downfall of Crassus, 54 to 53 B.C.
198(1)
The Fateful Rivalry between Pompey and Caesar
199(1)
The Death of Clodius, 52 B.C.
199(1)
Pompey Sole Consul, 52 B.C.
199(1)
Prelude to Civil War
200(1)
Caesar Crosses the Rubicon
200(1)
Caesar Reorganizes the Government
201(1)
Caesar in Spain, 49 B.C.
201(1)
Caesar's Second Consulship, 48 B.C.
202(1)
The Death of Pompey, 48 B.C.
202(1)
Caesar in Egypt, 48 to 47 B.C.
202(1)
Caesar in Italy, 47 B.C.
203(1)
The African Campaign, 46 B.C.
203(1)
Thapsus and the Death of Cato, 47 to 46 B.C.
203(1)
Caesar's Homecoming and Triumph, 46 B.C.
204(1)
The Spanish Campaign, 45 B.C.
204(1)
Caesar's Work of Reconstruction
204(3)
The Assassination of Julius Caesar, March 15, 44 B.C.
207(1)
The Question of Monarchy
207(1)
The Significance of Caesar
208(1)
XX The Last Days of the Republic, 44 to 30 B.C.
209(15)
The Rise of Marcus Antonius (ca. 83 to 30 B.C.)
209(1)
The Opposition of Octavian (63 B.C. to A.D. 14)
210(1)
Cicero, Antonius, and Octavian
211(2)
The Triumvirate of Octavian, Antonius, and Lepidus
213(1)
The Battle of Philippi, 42 B.C.
214(2)
The Predominance of Antonius, 39 to 37 B.C.
216(1)
Octavian Consolidates His Power
216(2)
Antonius and Cleopatra in the East
218(1)
The Approach of Renewed Civil War
219(1)
The Battle of Actium, September 2, 31 B.C.
220(1)
The Deaths of Antonius and Cleopatra
221(1)
The End of the Republic
221(3)
XXI Social, Economic, and Cultural Life in the Late Republic, ca. 133 to 30 B.C.
224(22)
Land and Veterans
224(1)
Agriculture
224(1)
Industry and Commerce
225(2)
The Concentration of Wealth
227(1)
Life for the Rural and Urban Poor
228(1)
Slaves and Freedmen
229(1)
Italians and Provincials
230(1)
Women in the Late Republic
230(2)
New Waves of Hellenization
232(1)
Education
232(1)
Law and the Legal System
233(1)
The Religious World of the Late Republic
234(1)
Greek Philosophy and the Roman Elite
235(1)
Art and Architecture
236(2)
Late Republican Oratory, Literature and Thought
238(2)
The Novi Poetae
240(1)
Catullus (ca. 85 to ca. 54 B.C.)
240(1)
Lucretius (ca. 94 to ca. 55 B.C.)
241(1)
Cicero (106 to 43 B.C.)
242(1)
Sallust (86 to ca. 34 B.C.)
243(1)
Caesar (100 to 44 B.C.)
244(1)
Scholarship and Patriotic Antiquarianism
244(2)
PART FOUR THE EARLY ROMAN EMPIRE 246(127)
XXII The Principate of Augustus, 29 B.C. to A.D. 14
246(9)
Sources for the Augustan Principate
246(1)
The Triumphal Return to Rome, 29 B.C.
246(1)
Problems to Be Faced
247(1)
Special Titles
247(1)
Creating the Principate
248(4)
The Nature of the Principate
252(1)
The Problem of Succession
253(2)
XXIII Systematic Reform under Augustus
255(10)
The Creation of a Central Administration
255(2)
The Manipulation of the Popular Assemblies
257(1)
The Administration of Justice
258(1)
Military Reforms
258(2)
Protection of the Emperor
260(1)
Fiscal Reforms
260(1)
Social Reforms
261(2)
Religious Reforms
263(2)
XXIV Imperial Stabilization under Augustus
265(12)
Improved Provincial Administration
265(3)
New Territories and Provinces
268(1)
The West
268(1)
The East
269(2)
Road Building
271(1)
The Imperial Post (Cursus Publicus)
271(2)
Colonization
273(1)
Urbanization of the Provinces
273(1)
Growth of the Imperial Cult
273(3)
The Death of Augustus
276(1)
XXV The Impact of Augustus on Roman Imperial Life and Culture
277(18)
The Population and Economic Impact of Rome
277(1)
Agriculture
278(1)
Agricultural Wealth and Urbanization
278(2)
Nonagricultural Trade and Industry
280(1)
The Roman Imperial Coinage
281(1)
Architecture and Art
282(4)
Literature
286(1)
Vergil (70 to 19 B.C.)
287(1)
Horace (65 to 8 B.C.)
288(1)
The Latin Elegy
289(1)
Latin Prose Writers
290(2)
The Impact of Augustus on Latin Literature
292(1)
Greek Writers
292(1)
Scholarly and Technical Writings
293(1)
Jurisprudence
293(1)
Law Schools
294(1)
The Augustan Achievement
294(1)
XXVI The First Two Julio-Claudian Emperors: Tiberius and Gaius (Caligula), A.D. 14 to 41
295(12)
Sources for the Julio-Claudians
295(2)
Tiberius (A.D. 14 to 37)
297(1)
Germanicus
298(2)
Sejanus
300(1)
The Law of Treason (Maiestas)
301(1)
Tiberius and the Senate: The Increasing Power of the Princeps
301(1)
Tiberius the Administrator
302(1)
Last Years and Succession
303(1)
Caligula (A.D. 37 to 41)
304(1)
Caligula's Foreign and Provincial Policies
305(1)
Assassination
306(1)
XXVII Claudius, Nero, and the End of the Julio-Claudians, A.D. 41 to 68
307(11)
Claudius (A.D. 41 to 54)
307(1)
The Political Philosophy and Policies of Claudius
308(1)
Foreign Policy and Imperial Defense
309(2)
Colonization and Urbanization in the Provinces
311(1)
Claudius' Wives
311(1)
Nero (A.D. 54 to 68)
312(1)
Nero Asserts Himself
313(1)
Nero and the Great Fire of Rome, 64
313(1)
Nero's Persecution of the Christians
314(1)
Reform of the Currency
314(1)
Plots against the Throne
315(1)
Nero's Concert Tour of Greece, 66 to 67
315(1)
Nero's Foreign Policy
315(1)
The Jewish Revolt
316(1)
The Revolt of Vindex, 68
317(1)
The Fall of Nero, 68
317(1)
XXVIII The Crisis of the Principate and Recovery under the Flavians, A.D. 69 to 96
318(11)
Sources
318(1)
Galba (68 to 69)
318(1)
Otho (69)
319(1)
Vitellius (69)
319(1)
Significant Trends
320(1)
Vespasian (69 to 79)
320(1)
The Restoration of Peace
320(2)
Reform of the Army
322(1)
Provincial Policy
322(1)
The Near East
323(1)
Vespasian's Relations with the Senate
323(1)
The Expansion of Executive Power
323(1)
Fiscal Administration
324(1)
The Opposition to Vespasian
324(1)
Vespasian's Death, 79
324(1)
Titus (79 to 81)
325(1)
Domitian (81 to 96)
325(2)
The Rebellion of Saturninus, 89
327(1)
The Dacian Frontier, 85 to 93
327(1)
Conspiracies and Treason Trials
327(1)
The Murder of Domitian, 96
327(2)
XXIX The "Good" Emperors of the Second Century, A.D. 96 to 180
329(16)
Sources
329(1)
Nerva (96 to 98)
330(1)
Trajan (98 to 117)
330(1)
A Model Emperor
331(1)
Trajan's Wars
332(1)
The Death of Trajan, 117
333(1)
The Effects of Trajan's Wars
333(1)
Hadrian (117 to 138)
333(1)
The Early Years of Hadrian's Principate
333(1)
Hadrian's Travels
334(1)
The Jewish Revolt
335(1)
New Directions under Hadrian
335(3)
The Last Years of Hadrian
338(1)
Antoninus Pius (138 to 161)
338(1)
Maintaining the Status Quo
339(1)
The Legacy of Antoninus
340(1)
Marcus Aurelius (161 to 180)
340(1)
Persecution of the Christians
341(1)
Marcus Aurelius as Emperor and Soldier
341(2)
The Question of Succession
343(1)
Problems for the Future
344(1)
XXX Imperial Culture and Society in the First Two Centuries A.D.
345(28)
Post-Augustan Imperial Literature
345(1)
Poverty of Literature under Tiberius and Caligula
346(1)
History
347(1)
Reference Works
347(1)
Poetry
347(1)
The Inauguration of the Silver Age in Literature under Claudius and Nero
348(1)
Technical Writing and Scholarship
349(2)
Science and Medicine
351(1)
Philology and Literary Scholarship
351(1)
Lack of Great Literature under the Flavians, A.D. 69 to 96
352(1)
Resurgence of Literature under the Five Good Emperors
353(2)
Resurgence of Greek Literature
355(1)
The Second Sophistic
356(1)
Christian Writers
357(1)
Philosophy
357(1)
Religion
358(1)
Mystery Cults
358(1)
Christianity
359(2)
Architecture in the First Two Centuries A.D.
361(4)
Architecture in the Provinces
365(1)
Sculpture
365(2)
Painting
367(1)
Mosaics, Coins, and Medallions
367(1)
Social Developments
368(1)
Economic Trends
369(2)
Inherent Economic and Fiscal Weakness of the Roman Empire
371(1)
The Failure of Ancient Technology
372(1)
PART FIVE CRISIS, CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE IN THE THIRD AND FOURTH CENTURIES 373(116)
XXXI Crisis and Temporary Recovery A.D. 180 to 235
373(11)
Sources for Roman History, A.D. 180 to 285
374(1)
Commodus (180 to 192)
374(1)
Pertinax and Didius Julianus, 193
375(1)
The Accession of Septimius Severus
376(1)
New Sources of Imperial Authority and Legitimacy
377(1)
Systematic Reform
377(2)
The Second Parthian War, 197 to 199
379(1)
The War in Britain, 208 to 211
380(1)
Caracalla (211 to 217)
380(1)
Macrinus (217 to 218)
381(1)
Impressive Syrian Queens
381(1)
Elagabalus (218 to 222)
381(1)
Severus Alexander (222 to 235)
382(1)
Social and Economic Policy
382(1)
The Military Problem
382(1)
The Importance of the Severi
383(1)
XXXII The Third-Century Anarchy, A.D. 235 to 285
384(12)
Reasons for the Crisis
384(1)
Maximinus Thrax (235 to 238)
385(1)
Gordian III (238 to 244)
386(1)
Philip the Arab (244 to 249)
386(1)
Decius (249 to 251)
387(1)
Gallus (251 to 253) and Aemilianus (253)
387(1)
Valerian (253 to 260) and Gallienus (253 to 268)
387(1)
The Eclipse of Roman Power in the East
388(1)
Palmyra
389(1)
The Last Battles of Gallienus, 268
389(1)
The Reforms of Gallienus
390(1)
An Assessment of Gallienus
391(1)
Claudius Gothicus (268 to 270)
391(1)
Aurelian (270 to 275)
391(2)
Tacitus (275 to 276)
393(1)
Probus (276 to 282)
394(1)
Carus and His Sons, Carinus and Numerianus (282 to 285)
394(2)
XXXIII Changes in Roman Life and Culture during the Third Century
396(19)
Economic Life
396(3)
Social Trends
399(3)
Third-Century Cultural Life
402(1)
Religion
403(4)
Science and Philosophy
407(1)
Education and the World of Letters
407(5)
Art and Architecture
412(2)
Summary and Prospect
414(1)
XXXIV Diocletian: Creating the Fourth-Century Empire, A.D. 285 to 305
415(12)
Sources for Roman History during the Fourth Century A.D.
415(2)
The Rise of Diocletian
417(1)
The Tetrarchy, 293 to 312
418(1)
Diocletian's Reforms
419(6)
Persecution of the Christians
425(1)
The Abdication
426(1)
XXXV Constantine the Great and Christianity, A.D. 306 to 337
427(11)
The Rise of Constantine, 306 to 312
427(3)
A Victory for Christianity
430(1)
The End of Maximinus Daia, 313
431(1)
The Empire Divided, 313 to 324
431(1)
The Donatist Schism
431(1)
The Arian Heresy
432(1)
The Defeat and Death of Licinius, 324
432(1)
The Council of Nicaea, 325
433(1)
Constantine's Secular Policies
433(2)
The Founding of Constantinople, 324 to 330
435(1)
The Death of Constantine the Great, 337
436(2)
XXXVI From Constantine's Dynasty to Theodosius the Great, A.D. 337 to 395
438(7)
Murder and Civil War
438(2)
Julian the Apostate Emperor (361 to 363)
440(1)
Jovian Proclaimed Emperor (late June 363)
441(1)
Valentinian I and Valens, 364 to 378
441(1)
Gratian and Theodosius the Great, 379 to 395
442(1)
The Death of Theodosius and the Division of the Empire, 395
443(2)
XXXVII The Evolving World of Late Antiquity in the Fourth Century A.D.
445(19)
Economic Conditions
445(3)
The Social Context
448(14)
Summary
462(2)
XXXVIII Christianity and Classical Culture in the Fourth Century
464(25)
Christianity and the Expansion of Classical Culture
464(5)
The Educated World of Letters
469(7)
Christian Literature of the Fourth Century
476(3)
Fourth-Century Art and Architecture
479(10)
PART SIX THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE ROMAN WORLD IN LATE ANTIQUITY 489(58)
XXXIX The Fifth-Century West: The Localization of Imperial Power under Germanic Kings
489(10)
Sources for Roman History from 395 to 518
489(2)
Problems and Weaknesses
491(1)
Stilicho
492(1)
Alaric Attacks Rome
493(1)
The Visigothic Migration and Settlement after Alaric
494(1)
The Vandals, Alans, and Suevi
494(1)
Galla Placidia, Valentinian III, and Aetius
494(1)
The Huns
495(1)
Attila
495(1)
The Burgundians
496(1)
The Franks
496(1)
Angles, Saxons, and Jutes
496(1)
The Vandals in Africa
496(1)
The End of Aetius' Ascendancy
496(1)
The Death of Valentinian III and the End of Theodosius' Dynasty in the West
497(1)
The Final Collapse of Central Authority
497(2)
XL Fifth-Century Empresses and the Survival of the Empire in the East, A.D. 395 to 518
499(7)
The Weak Men and Powerful Women of the Theodosian Dynasty (395 to 450)
499(2)
Persians and Huns, 408 to 450
501(1)
Christian Controversies and Imperial Politics
501(1)
German and Isaurian Generals
502(1)
Pulcheria and Marcian (450 to 457)
502(1)
Leo I (457 to 474)
502(1)
Leo II (473 to 474) and Zeno (474 to 491)
503(1)
Religious Controversies Continued
503(1)
Anastasius (491 to 518)
504(1)
Reforms
504(2)
XLI Justin and the Establishment of Justinian's Autocracy, A.D. 518 to 532
506(9)
Sources for the Period of Justin and Justinian
506(1)
The Reign of Justin (518 to 527)
507(1)
Justinian's Goals
507(1)
Theodora
508(1)
Religious Policies of Theodora and Justinian
508(1)
Legal Reforms
509(1)
Administrative Reforms
509(1)
John the Cappadocian
510(1)
Administration and Finance after John
511(1)
The First Persian War
512(1)
Circus Factions and the Nika Rebellion
512(1)
The Rebuilding of Constantinople
513(2)
XLII The Impossible Dream of Universal Empire, A.D. 532 to 602
515(9)
Reconquest of the North African Provinces, 533 to 534
515(1)
Italy
516(1)
Troubles in North Africa
517(1)
The Second Persian War, 540 to 562
517(1)
Resumption of War in Italy, 541 to 543
518(1)
Troubles Everywhere
518(1)
Belisarius Returns to Face Totila in Italy
518(1)
The Lazic War, 549 to 557
519(1)
Peace in the East
519(1)
Disaster in Italy, 549 to 551
519(1)
The Recovery of Italy, 552 to 562
519(1)
Wars on Other Fronts, 544 to 561
520(1)
Successes and Failures of Justinian's Reign
521(3)
XLIII The Transformation of the Late Antique Roman World, A.D. 395 to 600
524(18)
The Economy
524(3)
Social and Demographic Changes
527(5)
The New Cultural Spirit
532(7)
Art and Architecture
539(3)
XLIV The Church and the Legacy of Rome
542(5)
Transmitting the Roman Classical Legacy
542(2)
The Imperial Church
544(3)
Bibliography 547(12)
Index 559


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