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History of the World's Religions, A,9780130991652
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History of the World's Religions, A

by
Edition:
11th
ISBN13:

9780130991652

ISBN10:
0130991651
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $98.00
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Summary

For one-, two-semester, three-quarter, and upper-level undergraduate courses in World Religions. Refined by over 40 years of dialogue with religious experts/practitioners around the world, this text is widely regarded for its fairness and accuracy. It is also the most thorough, yet concise history of world religions available in a single volume, treating many subjects neglected in other texts. The book's depth, breadth, and organization free instructors from having to cover everything in lectures, enabling them to use class time for questions, discussion, and their own favorite materials.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Acknowledgements xii
PART 1 Some Primal and Bygone Religions 1(78)
Religion in Prehistoric and Primal Cultures
2(36)
Beginnings: Religion in Prehistoric Cultures
2(6)
Basic Terminology: Characterisitics of Religion in Primal Cultures
8(11)
Case Study: The Dieri of Southeast Australia
19(5)
Case Study: The BaVenda of South Africa
24(3)
Case Study: The Cherokees of the Southeastern Woodlands
27(11)
Glossary
37(1)
Bygone Religions That Have Left Their Mark on the West
38(41)
Mesopotamia
38(7)
Greece
45(12)
Rome
57(8)
Europe Beyond the Alps
65(6)
Mesoamerica: The Maya
71(8)
Glossary
78(1)
PART 2 The Religions of South Asia 79(174)
Early Hinduism: The Passage from Ritual Sacrifice to Mystical Union
80(26)
The Religion of the Vedic Age
81(10)
Brahmanism, Caste, and Ceremonial Life
91(15)
Glossary
103(3)
Later Hinduism: Religion as the Determinant of Social Behavior
106(46)
Changes in Brahmanism: The Four Goals and the Three Ways
107(2)
The Ordered Society: The Way of Works
109(3)
The Reflective Mode: The Way of Knowledge, the Upanishads
112(3)
The Reflective Models: The Six Acceptable Systems
115(6)
The Devotional Mode: The Way of Devotion, the Bhagavad Gita
121(4)
The Devotional Models: Epics, Puranas, and Deities
125(10)
The Devotional Life
135(6)
Issues and Problems of the Present
141(11)
Glossary
150(2)
Jainism: A Study in Asceticism
152(12)
Mahavira's Manner of Life
154(3)
Philosophy and Ethics of Jainism
157(4)
Mahavira's Followers
161(3)
Glossary
163(1)
Buddhism in Its First Phase: Moderation in World Renunciation
164(22)
Life of the Founder
165(9)
The Teachings of the Buddha
174(12)
Glossary
185(1)
The Religious Development of Buddhism: Diversity in Paths to Nirvana
186(54)
The Spread of Buddhism in India and Southeast Asia
188(7)
The Rise of the Mahayana in India
195(2)
The Spread of Buddhism in Northern Lands
197(5)
The Help-of-Others Message of the Mahayana
202(4)
The Mahayana Philosophies of Religion
206(6)
Mahayana Schools of Thought in China and Japan
212(12)
Buddhism in Tibet
224(6)
Buddhism Today
230(10)
Glossary
238(2)
Sikhism: A Study in Syncretism
240(13)
The Life and Work of Nanak
241(3)
Nanak's Teaching
244(2)
The Political History of Sikhism
246(7)
Glossary
252(1)
PART 3 The Religions of East Asia 253(100)
Native Chinese Religion and Daoism
254(34)
The Basic Elements of Chinese Religion
254(12)
Daoism as a Philosophy (Dao-jia)
266(11)
Daoism as Magic and Religion (Dao-jiao)
277(11)
Glossary
287(1)
Confucius and Confucianism: A Study in Optimistic Humanism
288(38)
The Man Confucius
289(3)
The Teachings of Confucius
292(12)
The Confucian School---Its Rivals and Champions
304(12)
Neo-Confucianism
316(4)
The State Cult of Confucius
320(2)
Religion in China in the Modern Period
322(4)
Glossary
325(1)
Shinto: The Native Contribution to Japanese Religion
326(27)
The Background of Shinto
327(3)
The Shinto Myth
330(3)
Shinto in Medieval and More Recent Times
333(5)
State Shinto to 1945
338(5)
Shinto and the Warrior
343(3)
Shrine Shinto Today
346(1)
Domestic and Sectarian Shinto
347(6)
Glossary
352(1)
PART 4 The Religions of the Middle East 353(247)
Zoroastrianism: A Religion Based on Ethical Dualism
354(22)
Iranian Religion Before Zoroaster
355(2)
The Life and Teachings of Zoroaster
357(6)
The Religion of the Later Avesta
363(6)
The Zoroastrians of the Present Day
369(7)
Glossary
375(1)
Judaism in Its Early Phases: From Hebrew Origins to the Exile
376(36)
The Religion of the Pre-Mosaic Hebrews
377(3)
Moses and the Covenant with Yahweh (About 1250 B.C.E.)
380(6)
Yahweh and the Baals
386(5)
Prophetic Protest and Reform
391(13)
The Babylonian Exile
404(8)
Glossary
411(1)
The Religious Development of Judaism
412(34)
The Rise of Judaism in the Restoration Period
412(6)
New Trends of Thought in the Greek and Maccabean Periods
418(5)
The Roman Period to 70 C.E
423(3)
The Great Dispersion
426(2)
The Making of the Talmud
428(3)
The Jews in the Middle Ages
431(7)
Judaism in the Modern World
438(8)
Glossary
445(1)
Christianity in Its Opening Phase: The Words and Work of Jesus in Apostolic Perspective
446(30)
The World into which Jesus Came
448(2)
The Life of Jesus: The First Phase
450(4)
The Themes of Jesus' Teaching
454(6)
The Climactic Events
460(3)
The Apostolic Age
463(6)
The Early Church (50--150 C.E.)
469(7)
Glossary
475(1)
The Religious Development of Christianity
476(56)
The Ancient Catholic Church (150--1054 C.E.)
476(12)
The Eastern Orthodox Churches
488(3)
The Roman Catholic Church in the Middle Ages
491(10)
The Protestant Reformation
501(9)
The Catholic Reformation
510(2)
Crosscurrents in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
512(4)
Eastern Orthodoxy in the Modern World
516(1)
Catholicism in the Modern World
517(4)
Protestantism in the Modern World
521(7)
Recent Theological Trends
528(4)
Glossary
531(1)
Islam: The Religion of Submission to God: Beginnings
532(36)
Arabian Beliefs and Practices Before Muhammad
533(4)
The Prophet Muhammad
537(6)
The Faith and Practice of Islam
543(9)
The Spread of Islam
552(3)
The First Five Centuries of Muslim Thought
555(13)
Glossary
567(1)
The Shi`ah Alternative and Regional Developments
568(32)
The Party (Shi`ah) of `Ali
568(7)
Further Developments
575(3)
Islam and Culture
578(3)
Issues in the Modern Period
581(3)
Regional Developments
584(12)
Movements Toward Innovation and Syncretism
596(4)
Glossary
599(1)
Reference for Quotations 600(11)
Suggestions for Further Reading 611(10)
Index 621

Excerpts

Just as the Nazi Holocaust incinerated naive assumptions about human nature and historical progress, so the flaming collapse of the World Trade Center in 2001 shattered assumptions about status quo, religion, and peace. Those of us who inquire into the history of the world's religions soon become aware that from the perspective of some of the religions the study of history is bound to be fruitless. Religions are about "what matters most" and to some that means transcending the temporal and in effect abandoning the search for meaning in the historical scene. Picking up a book like this may signify a desire to confirm that view, but it is more likely to signify a kind of bias, an underlying hope that the transcendent/immanent may indeed manifest itself in historical events--that the study of any religion should include its historical influence in social/political arenas as, for example, ethical policy in regard to the earth's resources and the degree to which all of humankind is in its purview. Given our biases, our best course is to try to present the views of others fairly. Will knowledgeable believers find our characterizations accurate? My elder brother, John B. Noss, spent ten years preparing the first (1949) edition of this book. At that time he found that most publications in the field tended to focus on the biographies of the founders and then jumped to comparing and evaluating the religions' contemporary practices. His preface to the first edition spoke of two special needs to be met: the first was to include "descriptive and interpretative details from theoriginal source materials" and second "to bridge the intervalbetween the founding of religions and their present state" (italics mine). Those who have used successive editions will recognize an increasing attentiveness to those needs. Primary source materials are not spliced in as undigested chunks but carefully embedded in interpretative commentary. Now color-highlighted, and sometimes further emphasized in color-framed quotations, the sources gain even more of the prominence they deserve. Illustrations have come to play a larger part: in addition to classic art and architecture, there are now depictions of ceremonial realia and explanations of ritual practices. Extended teaching captions go beyond the perfunctory identifications of the subjects. Resisting trends toward the abbreviating and "dumbing down" of college textbooks to accommodate diminished reading skills, this edition maintains a standard of thoroughness. Instead of abridgement, it offers enhancements: highlighted terms keyed to chapter-end glossaries, reinforcement of key ideas in color-framed quotations, line drawings to relieve solid columns of text, and the inclusion of some novels and light reading suggestions in the bibliography. Many teachers find a kind of liberation in putting a thorough text in the hands of students. This ensures a ready and reliable reference, relieves the pressure on the instructor to "cover" everything in lectures, and frees up the class time for questions and discussions on topics of immediate interest. The author is grateful for editorial assistance and expertise in ancient intellectual history generously contributed by David J. Noss of Washington, D.C. Special thanks are also due to Ross Miller, Carla Worrier, and Louise Rothman of Prentice Hall and to Lee Shenkman and Janet Stone of Victory Productions. David S. Noss dnoss@heidelberg.edu


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