9781405151412

How to Read a Poem

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781405151412

  • ISBN10:

    1405151412

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 10/20/2006
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

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Summary

Lucid, entertaining and full of insight, How To Read A Poem is designed to banish the intimidation that too often attends the subject of poetry, and in doing so to bring it into the personal possession of the students and the general reader. Offers a detailed examination of poetic form and its relation to content. Takes a wide range of poems from the Renaissance to the present day and submits them to brilliantly illuminating closes analysis. Discusses the work of major poets, including John Milton, Alexander Pope, John Keats, Christina Rossetti, Emily Dickinson, W.B. Yeats, Robert Frost, W.H.Auden, Seamus Heaney, Derek Mahon, and many more. Includes a helpful glossary of poetic terms.

Author Biography

Terry Eagleton is John Edward Taylor Professor of English Literature at the University of Manchester. His recent publications include The English Novel (2004), Sweet Violence: The Idea of the Tragic (2003), The Idea of Culture (2000), Scholars and Rebels in Nineteenth-Century Ireland (1999), Literary Theory: An Introduction (Second Edition, 1996) and The Illusions of Postmodernism (1996), all published by Blackwell Publishing.

Table of Contents

Preface vii
Acknowledgements viii
1 The Functions of Criticism 1(24)
1 The End of Criticism?
1(7)
2 Politics and Rhetoric
8(9)
3 The Death of Experience
17(5)
4 Imagination
22(3)
2 What is Poetry? 25(23)
1 Poetry and Prose
25(3)
2 Poetry and Morality
28(3)
3 Poetry and Fiction
31(7)
4 Poetry and Pragmatism
38(3)
5 Poetic Language
41(7)
3 Formalists 48(17)
1 Literariness
48(1)
2 Estrangement
49(3)
3 The Semiotics of Yury Lotman
52(7)
4 The Incarnational Fallacy
59(6)
4 In Pursuit of Form 65(37)
1 The Meaning of Form
65(5)
2 Form versus Content
70(9)
3 Form as Transcending Content
79(9)
4 Poetry and Performance
88(8)
5 Two American Examples
96(6)
5 How to Read a Poem 102(41)
1 Is Criticism Just Subjective?
102(6)
2 Meaning and Subjectivity
108(6)
3 Tone, Mood and Pitch
114(4)
4 Intensity and Pace
118(2)
5 Texture
120(1)
6 Syntax, Grammar and Punctuation
121(3)
7 Ambiguity
124(6)
8 Punctuation
130(1)
9 Rhyme
131(4)
10 Rhythm and Metre
135(3)
11 Imagery
138(5)
6 Four Nature Poems 143(22)
1 William Collins, 'Ode to Evening'
143(6)
2 William Wordsworth, 'The Solitary Reaper'
149(4)
3 Gerard Manley Hopkins, 'God's Grandeur'
153(4)
4 Edward Thomas, 'Fifty Faggots'
157(4)
5 Form and History
161(4)
Glossary 165(4)
Index 169

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