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Human Diversity Education

by ; ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780072287240

ISBN10:
0072287241
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/1/1999
Publisher(s):
MCG

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 3rd edition with a publication date of 8/1/1999.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

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Table of Contents

Preface xvii
Part One FOUNDATIONS FOR MULTICULTURAL TEACHING
Education in a Changing Society
3(24)
The Reality of Social Change
6(4)
Demographics in Transition
7(1)
Institutions in Transition
7(3)
Economics and Politics
Marriage and Family Life
Organized Religion
Schools As a Reflection of Social Change
10(3)
Demographics
10(1)
Language
10(1)
Ability
10(1)
Gender
11(1)
Students and Teachers: A Clash of Cultures?
11(1)
Rethinking Schools and Teaching
12(1)
Schools in Transition
13(9)
Characteristics of Second Wave Schools: Classrooms for the Industrial Age
13(2)
Standardization
Synchronization
Specialization
Centralization
Large Scale
Characteristics of Third Wave Schools: Classrooms for the Information Age
15(2)
Individualization and Choice
Collaboration
Diversity
Decentralization
Small Scale
Where We Are Today
17(1)
The Difficulty of Change
17(2)
Goals of This Book
19(1)
Recognize Social and Cultural Changes
20(1)
Understand Culture and the Culture-Learning Process
21(1)
Improve Intergroup and Intragroup Interactions
21(1)
Transmit Cross-Cultural Understanding and Skills to Students
21(1)
The Role of Stories, Cases, and Active Exercises in This Book
22(2)
Stories
22(1)
Cases
22(1)
Active Exercises
23(1)
Accessing the World Wide Web: Resources for Diversity
23(1)
References
24(3)
Multicultural Education: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives
27(28)
Historical Perspectives on Pluralism
30(4)
We Have Been Different from the Beginning
30(1)
Industrialization, Immigration, and Religious Pluralism
31(1)
The Civil War: Freedmen's Schools and the Issue of Race
32(1)
The Civil Rights Movement and the Schools
33(1)
Historical Perspectives on Multicultural Education
34(9)
Anglo-Conformity and Assimilationist Ideology
34(2)
Multiculturalism and the Pluralist Ideology
36(1)
Legislative and Judicial Landmarks
37(1)
Public Responses to Multicultural and Bilingual Education Reforms
38(2)
Judicial and Legislative Mandates Regarding Equity
40(2)
Reaction to Multicultural Education in the 1980s and 1990s
42(1)
Contemporary Approaches to Multicultural Education Programs
43(5)
The Sleeter and Grant Categories
43(3)
Teaching the Culturally Different
Human Relations
Single-Group Studies
Inclusive Multicultural Education
Education That Is Multicultural and Social Reconstructionist
The Mitchell Typology
46(2)
Models of Cultural Understanding
Models of Cultural Competence
Models of Cultural Emancipation and Social Reconstruction
The Outcomes of Multicultural Education
48(2)
Student Outcomes
48(1)
Program Outcomes
48(1)
Active Exercises
49(1)
Accessing the World Wide Web: Resources for Diversity
50(1)
References
50(5)
Culture and the Culture-Learning Process
55(38)
Exploring the Concept of Culture
59(1)
Three Views of Culture
59(1)
Anthropology
59(4)
Humans Construct Culture
Culture Is Shared
Culture Is Both
Objective and Subjective
Culture Is Nurtured
Sociology
63(2)
Subculture
Microculture
Minority Group
Ethnic Group
People of Color
Cross-Cultural Psychology
65(4)
Culture-Specific vs. Culture-General Frameworks
Themes from Cross-Cultural Psychology
The Culture-Learning Process
68(1)
What Is Learned: The Sources of Cultural Knowledge
69(6)
Race
Sex/Gender
Health
Ability/Disability
Social Class
Ethnicity/Nationality
Religion/Spirituality
Geographic Location
Age
Sexuality
Language
Social Status
How Culture Is Learned: The Socializing Agents
75(2)
When Culture Is Learned
77(3)
Primary Socialization: Cultural Similarities
Secondary Socialization
Some Results of Socialization
80(4)
Ethnocentrism
80(1)
Perception
81(1)
Categorization
81(1)
Stereotypes
82(1)
Some Limits on Socialization
83(1)
Understanding Cultural Differences
84(5)
Variations in Cultural Environments: Returning to Grover's Corners
84(2)
Variations in Cultural Attributes, Socializing Agents, and Cultural Learners
86(2)
Active Exercises
88(1)
Accessing the World Wide Web: Resources for Diversity
88(1)
References
89(4)
Classrooms and Schools as Cultural Crossroads
93(28)
Schools and Classrooms: Where Cultures Intersect
94(5)
Student Culture
94(1)
Teacher Culture
94(1)
School Culture
95(1)
Teachers as Cultural Mediators
96(1)
Reshaping of Cultural Identity
96(3)
A Model of Cross-Cultural Interaction
99(10)
Understanding Emotional Responses in Intercultural Interaction
101(2)
Anxiety
Ambiguity
Disconfirmed Expectations
Belonging/Rejection
Confronting Personal Prejudice
Understanding the Cultural Basis of Unfamiliar Behavior
103(3)
Communication and Language
Values
Rituals
Situational Behavior
Roles
Social Status
Time and Space Orientation
Relationship to the Group
Making Adjustments and Reshaping Cultural Identity
106(3)
Categorization
Differentiation
Attribution
Ingroups and Outgroups
Learning Style
Application of the Culture-General Model
109(8)
Commonalities Among Groups
110(1)
Differences Within a Group
110(1)
Critical Incidents at Alden High
111(5)
Active Exercises
116(1)
Accessing the World Wide Web: Resources for Diversity
117(1)
References
117(4)
Part Two MULTICULTURAL TEACHING IN ACTION
Developing Learning Communities: Language and Learning Style
121(40)
Characteristics of a Learning Community
130(4)
Pedagogies: Old and New
132(1)
Roles: Old and New
133(1)
Place of Content Knowledge: Old and New
133(1)
Assessment: Old and New
134(1)
Perspectives on Language Acquisition
134(2)
Language and the Family
134(1)
Institutional Aspects of Language
135(1)
Perspectives on Language Variation
136(4)
Verbal Communication
136(3)
Accents
Dialects
Bidialectalism
Sign Language
Nonverbal Communication
139(1)
Proxemics
Kinesics
139(1)
Paralanguage
Culture, Language, and Learning Style
140(11)
Components of Learning Style
141(1)
Origins of Learning Style
142(1)
The Relation of Language and Learning Style to Culture
142(2)
Communication Style
144(1)
Formal vs. Informal Communication
Emotional vs. Subdued Communication
Direct vs. Indirect Communication
Objective vs. Subjective Communication
Responses to Guilt and Accusations
Bilingual Education
145(6)
Types of Bilingual Programs
An Explanation of Bilingual Functioning
Why Bilingual Education Is Important
Outcomes of Bilingual Education Efforts
Ethical Issues in Bilingual Education
Some Reflective Questions
151(4)
Active Exercises
152(2)
Accessing the World Wide Web: Resources for Diversity
154(1)
References
155(6)
Creating Developmentally Appropriate Classrooms: The Importance of Age and Developmental Status
161(24)
Rationale For Developmentally Appropriate Educational Practices
167(4)
Economic Aims for Schooling
168(1)
Early Childhood Education and Developmentally Appropriate Practice
169(1)
Constructivist Thought in Developmentally Appropriate Practice
169(2)
Characteristics of a Developmentally Appropriate Classroom
171(5)
Pedagogies: Old and New
171(2)
Roles: Old and New
173(2)
Place of Content Knowledge: Old and New
175(1)
Assessment: Old and New
175(1)
Perspectives on Age and Development
176(5)
Sensitive Periods and Developmental Crises
176(1)
Individual Differences and Developmental Domains
177(1)
The Importance of Developmental Knowledge
178(2)
Active Exercises
180(1)
Accessing the World Wide Web: Resources for Diversity
180(1)
References
181(4)
Creating Inclusive Classrooms: The Health Dimension and Ability/Disability Continuum
185(28)
Rationale for Inclusive Classrooms
190(3)
Characteristics of an Inclusive Classroom
193(5)
Pegagogies: Old and New
194(1)
Roles: Old and New
194(2)
Place of Content Knowledge: Old and New
196(1)
Assessment: Old and New
196(2)
Perspectives on Health and the Ability/Disability Continuum
198(12)
The Health Dimension
198(2)
The Ability/Disability Continuum
200(1)
What Is ``Exceptionality?''
201(1)
Historical Perspectives on Special Education
201(3)
The Importance of Collaboration
204(1)
What Does ``Flexibility'' Involve?
205(1)
Ethical Issues
206(3)
Active Exercises
209(1)
Accessing the World Wide Web: Resources for Diversity
209(1)
References
210(3)
Developing a Collaborative Classroom: Gender and Sexual Orientation
213(30)
Rationale for Collaborative Teaching and Learning
219(1)
Characteristics of a Collaborative Classroom
220(6)
Pedagogies: Old and New
221(2)
Roles: Old and New
223(2)
Place of Content Knowledge: Old and New
225(1)
Assessment: Old and New
225(1)
Perspectives on Gender and Sexual Orientation
226(3)
Sex Role Socialization
226(1)
Sex Role Socialization in the Middle Class
227(1)
Masculine and Feminine Behavior
228(1)
Perspectives on Schools as Socializing Agents
229(4)
Sex Role Stereotypes in School
230(2)
Recent Studies
232(1)
Perspectives on Gender and School Culture
233(5)
Productive and Reproductive Processes
233(1)
Gender and European American Values in Traditional School Culture
233(2)
Gender and School Rules
235(1)
Homophobia and School Culture
235(3)
Ethical Issues
238(1)
Some Reflective Questions
238(2)
Active Exercises
239(1)
Accessing the World Wide Web: Resources for Diversity
239(1)
References
240(3)
The Classroom as a Global Community: Race, Ethnicity/Nationality, and Region
243(40)
Rationale for the Classroom As a Global Community
253(3)
Education for a Global Perspective
254(1)
Hoopes's Model of Intercultural Education
254(2)
Characteristics of a Global Classroom
256(3)
Pedagogies: Old and New
256(1)
Roles: Old and New
257(1)
Place of Content Knowledge: Old and New
258(1)
Assessment: Old and New
258(1)
Case Analysis
259(1)
Perspectives On a Globally Oriented Curriculum
259(20)
Curriculum Transformation: The Case of Prejudice
259(9)
The Functions of Prejudice
Extreme Cases of Prejudice: Hate Groups
The Components of Prejudice
White Privilege
Prejudice Formation
Prejudice Reduction
Curriculum Transformation: The International Perspective
268(7)
Perspective Consciousness
State of the Planet Awareness
Cross-Cultural Awareness
Knowledge of Global Dynamics or World Systems
Awareness of Human Choice
Teaching the Global Perspective
Ethical Issues
275(2)
Active Exercises
277(1)
Some Critical Incidents
277(1)
A Delayed Response
Nurturing a Gang?
Accessing the World Wide Web: Resources for Diversity
278(1)
References
279(4)
Religious Pluralism in Secular Classrooms
283(26)
Rationale for Attending to Religion in Public Schools
286(4)
Definitions of Religion
287(1)
Religious Pluralism in the United States
288(2)
Characteristics of a Classroom that Attends to Religious Pluralism
290(4)
Pedagogies: Old and New
290(1)
Roles: Old and New
291(1)
Place of Content Knowledge: Old and New
292(1)
Assessment: Old and New
293(1)
Analysis of the Case Study
294(1)
Perspectives on Religion and Schooling in the United States
294(7)
Private Freedoms: Religion and Compulsory Attendance
295(2)
Private Freedoms: The Practice of Religious Beliefs in Classrooms
297(1)
Public Freedoms: Public Funding for Religious Schools
298(2)
Public Freedoms: The Provision of Religious Instruction
300(1)
Perspectives on Religious Identity
301(4)
Religion as a Form of Personal Identity
301(1)
The Influence of the ``Religious Right''
302(2)
Ethical Issues
304(1)
Some Reflective Questions
305(1)
Active Exercises
306(1)
Accessing the World Wide Web: Resources for Diversity
306(1)
References
306(3)
Assessing Progress: The Importance of Social Class and Social Status
309(32)
Rationale for a Broadened Definition of Assessment
316(3)
The Case Against Standardized Testing
317(1)
The Case for Alternative Forms of Assessment
318(1)
Characteristics of a Classroom Using Both Traditional and Alternative Assessments
319(9)
Pedagogies: Old and New
320(1)
Roles: Old and New
320(1)
Place of Content Knowledge: Old and New
320(1)
Assessment: Old and New
321(1)
The Importance of Criteria
322(1)
The Issue of Grading
322(3)
Sorting
Motivation
Feedback
Case Analysis
325(3)
Perspectives on Social Class and Social Status
328(5)
Definitions of Social Class
328(1)
Social Class and Minority Group Membership
329(1)
The Working Poor
330(1)
Social Class and Childrearing Practices
330(2)
Social Status
332(1)
The Importance of Teacher Expectations
332(1)
Perspectives on Alternative Assessment
333(3)
Demand Versus Support
333(2)
Ethical Issues
335(1)
Some Reflective Questions
336(2)
Accessing the World Wide Web: Resources for Diversity
337(1)
References
338(3)
Classrooms of Today and Tomorrow
341(15)
Creation of an Inclusive Environment
342(5)
Sociocultural Inclusion
343(2)
Curriculum Inclusion and Expansion
345(1)
Modification of Pedagogy
346(1)
Modification of Assessment Strategies
347(1)
Community and the School
347(6)
The Process of Change: From Self to Other
353(2)
In Conclusion
355(1)
References 356(2)
Photo Credits 358(1)
Author Index 359(3)
Subject Index 362


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