9781442213852

The Human Journey: A Concise Introduction to World History: Prehistory to 1450

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  • ISBN13:

    9781442213852

  • ISBN10:

    144221385X

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 11/8/2012
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc
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Summary

There isn't much if any at this length and bare-bones style. Even the "brief" editions of the big texts are 8.5x11 trim, 750 or so pages. -Strayer/Ways of the World (Bedford St. Martins 2008) 880 pp $78.95 full color in 1 vol, 480 pp $60.95 each in 2 vols.) 2268 PT combined, 4216 PT vol. 1, 7253 PT vol. 2. (The closest competitor, but our book is different in the following respects: 1) half the length, lower price, 2) bare-bones narrative approach, 3) chronological instead of thematic)-Stearns/World History in Brief 7e, Prentice-Hall, October 2009. Combined volume, paper, 720 pp, $64. Split volumes, paper, 304-448 pp, $60 each. 348 PT combined, 1054 PT vol. 1, 1343 PT vol. 2.-McNeill and McNeill/The Human Web: too difficult for most students and somewhat quirky. Norton 2003. Paper 368 pp, $19. B&W illustrations. 1101 PT since 2007.-David Christian/This Fleeting World: A Short History of Humanity. Very brief. Berkshire 2007. Paper, 120 pp, $14.95. 585 PT.

Author Biography

Kevin Reilly is professor of history at Raritan Valley Community College.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrationsp. xv
Prefacep. xvii
The Long Prologue: From 14 Billion Years Agop. 1
Peopling the Planet: The Earth as a Global Frontierp. 3
A Little Big Historyp. 3
First Life on Earthp. 3
Three Explosions of Lifep. 3
Changing Surfacesp. 4
Changes in Climatep. 5
Human Originsp. 5
Natural Selectionp. 5
Hominids Stand Tallp. 6
Hominids to Humansp. 6
Culture Trumps Naturep. 7
Global Migrationp. 7
Humans as Travelersp. 8
The First Modern Humansp. 9
Cave Paintings and Female Figurinesp. 10
Cultural Adaptationp. 11
Human Differences: Race and Culturep. 12
Do Numbers Count? Patterns of Population Growthp. 14
Most of Human History: Foraging Societiesp. 14
Lifestyles of Foragersp. 14
Sexual Division of Laborp. 16
Relative Social Equalityp. 16
Leisure Timep. 16
Merging Old and Newp. 17
Subduing the Earth: The Consequences of Domesticationp. 18
The First Breakthrough: Origins of Agricultural/Pastoral Economiesp. 18
Control over Food Supplyp. 18
Why Agriculture Developedp. 19
Selecting Crops to Growp. 19
Reducing Varietyp. 20
Globalization and Continental Varietyp. 20
Geography as Destinyp. 22
East-West Transmission Advantagesp. 23
Agriculture and Languagep. 24
The Long Agricultural Age: Places and Processesp. 25
Jerichop. 25
Catal Huyukp. 26
Banpop. 27
Ibo Culturep. 29
The Tainop. 30
Neolithic Continuity and Changep. 32
Changes in a Mexican Valleyp. 32
Conclusionp. 33
The Brave New World of City, State, and Pasture: From 3000 BCEp. 37
The Urban Revolution: Causes and Consequencesp. 39
The Epic of Gilameshp. 39
The First Citiesp. 40
The Urban Revolutionp. 40
First-City Firstsp. 40
Origin of Cities in Plow and Irrigationp. 40
Middle Eastp. 41
East Asiap. 41
Americasp. 41
The Brave New World: Squares and Crowdsp. 42
Tall Buildings and Monumental Architecturep. 43
Social Classes and Inequalityp. 43
Officials and Scribesp. 43
Slaves and Servantsp. 43
Farmers and Workersp. 44
New Systems of Controlp. 44
Fathers and Kingsp. 44
Religion and Queensp. 44
Law and the Statep. 45
Hammurabi's Codep. 46
New Urban Classes in City-States and Territorial Statesp. 46
Merchantsp. 47
Priestsp. 47
Soldiersp. 48
New Country Peoplep. 48
Change and "Civilization"p. 49
The Bias of "Civilization"p. 49
Achievements of Ancient Civilizationsp. 49
Writingp. 50
Control and Changep. 50
Pasture and Empirep. 51
Nomads Put the Horse before the Cartp. 52
New Balance between City and Pasturep. 53
Nomads Conquer and Create Empiresp. 54
States Regain Empires with Chariotsp. 54
Empires and Collapsep. 55
Iron Age Eurasiap. 57
Iron versus Bronzep. 57
New Forms of Inclusiveness: Words and God for Allp. 57
Iron as Metaphorp. 57
The Invention of the Alphabetp. 59
"T" Is for Tradep. 59
Monotheismp. 61
Gods at Warp. 61
The Rivers of Babylonp. 62
Citizenship and Salvation: Leveling in Life and Deathp. 63
The Cities of Babylonp. 63
The Persian Paradisep. 64
Imperial Size and Reachp. 65
Ships and Satrapiesp. 65
Conclusionp. 65
The Legacy of Gilgamesh's Wallp. 65
The Promise of Pharaoh's Dreamp. 66
Eurasian Classical Cultures and Empires: 600 BCE-200 CEp. 69
The Great Traditions of the Classical Agep. 71
The Classical Agep. 71
The Great Divergencep. 71
Interpreting Literaturep. 71
Differences Not Permanentp. 72
The Ways of India and Greecep. 72
Indiap. 73
Vedic Civilizationp. 73
Four Varnasp. 73
Karma and Reincarnationp. 74
Farmers and Jatisp. 75
Cities, States, and Buddhismp. 75
Mauryan Dynastyp. 76
Ashokap. 76
Buddhism, Politics, and Commercep. 77
Greecep. 77
The Hellenesp. 77
Clans into Citizensp. 77
The Polis and Greek Religionp. 78
Public Spaces and Public Dramasp. 79
Freedom and Lawp. 80
Law and War between Statesp. 80
Laws of Naturep. 81
Athenian Democracyp. 82
Athens City Limitsp. 83
The Worlds of Rome and Chinap. 84
Romep. 84
Greco-Roman Society and Hellenismp. 84
Republic Not a Democracyp. 85
Armies, Lands, and Citizensp. 86
Praetors and Publicansp. 86
Cicero on Provincial Governmentp. 86
Civil War and Empirep. 87
Empire and Lawp. 87
Administering the Roman Empirep. 88
No Bureaucracyp. 89
The Pax Romanap. 90
The Third Centuryp. 90
Chinap. 91
Similarities and Differencesp. 91
Lineages, Cities, and Statesp. 92
Confuciusp. 93
Legalism and the Unification of Chinap. 94
Qin Creates Chinap. 95
The Solution of Hanp. 96
Empire and Dynastic Successionp. 98
The Mandate of Heavenp. 98
A Government of Expertsp. 98
Salt and Ironp. 100
Palace, Consort Families, and Taxesp. 101
Strains of Empirep. 102
Conclusionp. 102
The Spread of New Ways in Eurasia: 200 CE-1000 CEp. 105
Cultural Encounters and Integrationp. 107
The Silk Roadp. 107
The Spread of Salvation Religionsp. 109
Classical Collapse and Hard Timesp. 109
Population Declinep. 110
Weather or Not?p. 110
Southernizationp. 110
Southern Sanctuariesp. 110
Himalayas and Horsesp. 110
Iran: Between Two Worldsp. 111
Iranian Societyp. 111
Iranian Religionsp. 111
India and Southeast Asiap. 112
The Kushan Preludep. 113
Monsoon Windsp. 113
Malay Sailsp. 114
Tropical Cropsp. 115
Wet Ricep. 115
Gupta Indiap. 115
Hinduism in Southeast Asiap. 116
Buddhism beyond Indiap. 116
Mahayana Buddhismp. 117
Buddhism in Central Asia and Chinap. 118
The Way of the Wayp. 118
The Uses of Magicp. 119
Monks, Missionaries, and Monarchsp. 119
Pilgrims and Writingsp. 120
Temple and Statep. 120
Christianity beyond Palestinep. 122
Hellenizationp. 122
Paul versus Peterp. 122
Healing and Miraclesp. 123
Jews and Christiansp. 123
Conversion of the Roman Empirep. 123
The Eastern Roman Empire and Beyondp. 125
Soldiers and Emperorsp. 125
The Tribes of Europep. 126
Orthodoxy, Heresy, and Assimilationp. 126
Christianity in Europe and Chinap. 127
The Rise of Islam: The Making of a World Civilizationp. 129
Salvation, Endings, and Beginningsp. 129
The Prophet: Trade and Religionp. 129
Islam beyond Arabiap. 130
Islamic Expansion to 750p. 130
Islamic Expansion after 750p. 132
The First World Civilizationp. 133
Abbasid Baghdadp. 133
A Cultural Empirep. 134
Conclusionp. 135
The Making of an Afro-Eurasian Network: 1000 CE-1450 CEp. 139
China in the Making of an Afro-Eurasian Networkp. 142
Industry and Inventionp. 142
Textiles and Potteryp. 142
Paper and Printingp. 143
Compass and Shipsp. 144
Guns and Gunpowderp. 144
Iron and Coalp. 145
Industrial Revolution?p. 145
Commerce and Capitalismp. 146
Money and Marketsp. 147
Public versus Private Enterprisep. 147
Hangzhoup. 147
State and Bureaucracyp. 149
The Modern Statep. 149
A Bureaucracy of Expertsp. 150
Mongols in the Making of an Afro-Eurasian Networkp. 150
The Mongolsp. 150
Death and Destructionp. 151
Trade and Tolerancep. 151
Political Divisions and Economic Unityp. 153
World History for a Global Agep. 153
Ecological Unity: A Dark Victoryp. 154
Islam in the Making of an Afro-Eurasian Networkp. 155
New Muslims from the Steppep. 155
Slaves, Soldiers, and Sonsp. 156
In Place of Governmentp. 157
Muslims, Merchants, and Marketsp. 158
A Merchant's Religionp. 158
Cairop. 160
Islam in Africap. 161
Islam in West Africap. 161
Swahili Culturep. 162
A Single Ecozonep. 162
Islam in India and Indonesiap. 163
Europe in the Making of an Afro-Eurasian Networkp. 164
Revival and Expansionp. 164
Good Weather and Good Luckp. 166
Two Europes, Four Economiesp. 167
Cities and Statesp. 167
Urban Renewalp. 168
City-States and Citizenshipp. 168
Law and Sciencep. 169
Natural Law and Natural Reasonp. 169
Twelfth-Century Renaissancep. 169
Popular Sciencep. 171
The Formation of the Modern Networkp. 173
Death and Rebirthp. 173
The Renaissancep. 174
The Classical and the Novelp. 174
Japan and Koreap. 175
Imitators and Innovatorsp. 176
Conclusion: The Virtues of Varietyp. 178
Parallel Worlds of Inner Africa, the Americas, and Oceania: Before 1450p. 183
The World of Inner Africap. 185
Geography, Race, and Languagep. 185
The World's Three Transformations in Africap. 186
Humans, Farmers, and Statesp. 186
The Nile Connectionp. 186
The Saharan Separationp. 187
The Bantu Migrationsp. 187
Words, Seeds, and Ironp. 188
A Common Culture?p. 189
Empires, States, and Stateless Societiesp. 189
Politics, Population, and Climatep. 189
Lots of Landp. 190
West Africap. 191
Stateless Societiesp. 191
Kingdoms for Horsesp. 191
East and South Africap. 192
Cattle and Colonizationp. 192
Great Zimbabwep. 192
Inner Africa and the Worldp. 193
The World of the Americasp. 193
States and Empires of Middle Americap. 194
Before the Azetecsp. 194
Classical Mayanp. 194
A Theoretical Interlude: Priests and Soldiersp. 195
Toltecs and Aztecsp. 195
States and Empires of South Americap. 198
Before the Incasp. 198
Classical Chavinp. 199
Moche Warrior Priests and Divine Emperorsp. 199
Incas and Their Ancestorsp. 200
States and Peoples of North Americap. 202
Peoples and Placesp. 203
Rich Pacific Fisheriesp. 203
Pueblos of the Southwestp. 204
Eastern Woodland Farmersp. 204
Americas and the Worldp. 205
The World of the Pacificp. 206
Islands and Settlersp. 206
Islandsp. 206
First Wavep. 206
Australiap. 207
Austronesian and Polynesian Migrationsp. 207
Austronesian Migrationsp. 207
Polynesian Migrationsp. 207
Language and Culturep. 209
Ecology and Colonizationp. 210
The Advantages of Parallel Worldsp. 211
The Lessons of Parallel Worldsp. 211
Lessons of Similaritiesp. 211
Similarities or Connectionsp. 212
Lessons of Differencesp. 212
The Strength of Parallel Worldsp. 213
Indexp. 409
About the Authorp. 429
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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