9780415360685

Human Rights

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780415360685

  • ISBN10:

    0415360684

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2005-05-19
  • Publisher: Routledge
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Summary

Are human rights part of the problem or part of the solution in the current 'clash of civilizations'? Drawing on a hitherto neglected body of work in classical social theory and combining it with ideas derived from Barrington Moore, Norbert Elias and Michel Foucault, Woodiwiss poses and answers the questions: How did human rights become entangled with power relations? How might the nature of this entanglement be altered so that human rights better serve the global majority? In answering these questions, he explains how and why rights discourse developed in such distinctive ways in four key locations: Britain, the United States, Japan and in the UN. On this basis he provides, for the first time, a general sociological account of the development of international human rights discourse, which represents a striking challenge to current thinking and policy.

Author Biography

Anthony Woodiwiss is Dean of Social Sciences at City University, London.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements ix
Introduction: Rights and power xi
PART I Making rights
1(76)
The paradox of human rights
3(13)
Towards a sociology of rights
16(17)
From rights to liberty in England and the United States
33(11)
The comparative sociology of rights regimes
44(7)
From liberty to the `rule of (property) law' in the United States
51(14)
Japan, the rule of law and the absence of liberty
65(12)
PART II Righting the world?
77(59)
The United States and the invention of human rights
79(13)
The Warren Court: setting the international human rights agenda
92(10)
The United Nations and the internationalisation of American rights discourse
102(9)
Making an example of Japan
111(10)
The desire for equality and the emergence of a sociology for human rights
121(15)
Conclusion: for a new universalism 136(14)
Notes 150(3)
Bibliography 153(16)
Index 169

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