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Human Sexuality Today,9780131891647
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Human Sexuality Today

by
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780131891647

ISBN10:
0131891642
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $88.80
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Summary

This appealing, readable and humanistic guide to human sexuality achieves a sound balance between facts and understanding, giving readers the information they need to make responsible decisions and helping them feel comfortable about themselves while learning about their sexuality.A wide range of chapter topics discuss hormones and sexuality, similarities and differences in our sexual responses, sexually transmitted and sexually related diseases, birth control, pregnancy and childbirth, communicating about sex, gender identity and gender roles, sexual orientation, love and relationships, sexual problems and therapy, sexual victimization, and sex and the law.For individuals seeking to learn more about human sexuality and its most current issues.

Table of Contents

Preface xii
About the Author xiii
Why a Course in Human Sexuality?
1(29)
A Sexual Knowledge Quiz
3(3)
Cross-Cultural Comparisons
6(5)
Sexual Attractiveness
7(1)
Sexual Behaviors and Attitudes
8(2)
Cultural Diversity Within the United States
10(1)
Historical Perspectives
11(5)
Judaism
11(1)
The Greeks and Romans
12(1)
Christianity
12(2)
Victorianism
14(2)
The Sexual Revolution
16(1)
Sex as a Science
16(3)
Sigmund Freud (1856--1939)
17(1)
Henry Havelock Ellis (1859--1939)
17(1)
Alfred C. Kinsey (1894--1956)
18(1)
Masters and Johnson
18(1)
The National Health and Social Life Survey
19(1)
Scientific Methodology
19(5)
Surveys and Samples
19(2)
An Example of Problems in Survey Studies: What Does ``Sex,'' ``Had Sex,'' and ``Sexual Relations'' Mean?
21(1)
Correlation
22(1)
Direct Observations
22(1)
Case Studies
23(1)
Experimental Research
23(1)
Sexuality Education Today
24(2)
Suggested Readings
26(1)
Study Guide
26(4)
Our Sexual and Reproductive Anatomy
30(27)
External Female Anatomy
31(9)
The Mons Veneris
32(1)
The Labia
32(1)
The Clitoris
33(1)
The Vaginal Opening
34(1)
The Urethral Opening
35(1)
The Breasts
35(2)
Box 2-A: Sexuality and Health: Breast Cancer and Examination
37(3)
Internal Female Anatomy
40(5)
The Vagina
40(2)
The Uterus
42(1)
The Fallopian Tubes
42(1)
The Ovaries
42(1)
Box 2-B: Sexuality and Health: Cancer of the Female Reproductive System
43(2)
External Male Anatomy
45(4)
The Penis: Outer Appearance
45(1)
Box 2-C: Cross-Cultural Perspectives/Sexuality and Health: Male Circumcision
46(1)
The Penis: Internal Structure
47(1)
The Scrotum
47(2)
Internal Male Anatomy
49(3)
The Testicles
49(1)
The Duct System
49(1)
The Prostate Gland and Seminal Vesicles
49(1)
Box 2-D: Sexuality and Health: Testicular Cancer and Self-Examination
50(1)
The Cowper's Glands
50(1)
Box 2-E: Sexuality and Health: Prostate Problems and Examination
51(1)
The Brain
52(1)
Our Sexual Bodies
52(1)
Suggested Readings
53(1)
Study Guide
54(3)
Hormones and Sexuality
57(18)
The Endocrine System
58(1)
The Menstrual Cycle
59(2)
Preovulatory Phase (Days 5 to 13)
59(1)
Ovulation (Day 14)
60(1)
Postovulatory Phase (Days 15 to 28)
60(1)
Menstruation (Days 1 to 4)
60(1)
Length of the Menstrual Cycle
61(1)
Menstrual Synchrony and Pheromones
61(1)
Menstrual Versus Estrous Cycle
62(1)
Attitudes About Menstruation: Historical Perspectives
63(1)
Attitudes About Menstruation Today
63(3)
Box 3-A: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Menstrual Taboos Versus Menstrual Celebrations
64(2)
Menstrual Problems
66(3)
Amenorrhea
66(1)
Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)
67(1)
Dysmenorrhea
68(1)
Endometriosis
69(1)
Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS)
69(1)
Regulation of Male Hormones
69(1)
Hormones and Sexual Desire
70(2)
Box 3-B: Sexuality and Health: Anabolic Steroids
71(1)
Suggested Readings
72(1)
Study Guide
72(3)
Similarities and Differences in Our Sexual Responses
75(24)
Measurement of Sexual Responses
76(1)
Models of Sexual Response
77(1)
Men's Sexual Response Cycle
77(4)
Desire
77(1)
Excitement (Arousal)
78(1)
Plateau
78(1)
Orgasm
79(1)
Resolution
80(1)
Women's Sexual Response Cycle
81(4)
Desire
81(1)
Excitement (Arousal)
82(1)
Plateau
83(1)
Orgasm
84(1)
Resolution
84(1)
Controversies About Orgasms
85(5)
Are All Women Capable of Orgasm During Sexual Intercourse?
85(1)
How Many Types of Female Orgasm Are There?
86(1)
Do Women Ejaculate During Orgasm?
87(1)
Box 4-A: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Female Genital Mutilation
88(2)
Can Men Have Multiple Orgasms?
90(1)
Penis Size: Does It Matter?
90(2)
Aphrodisiacs: Do They Help?
92(1)
Sexuality and People With Disabilities
93(3)
Suggested Readings
96(1)
Study Guide
96(3)
Sexually Transmitted and Sexually Related Diseases
99(41)
What Are They and Who Gets Them?
100(1)
Where Did They Come From?
101(1)
Gonorrhea
101(2)
Symptoms and Complications
102(1)
Diagnosis and Treatment
103(1)
Chlamydia and Nongonococcal Urethritis
103(2)
Symptoms and Complications
104(1)
Diagnosis and Treatment
104(1)
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) in Women: A Likely Consequence of Untreated Chlamydia or Gonorrhea
104(1)
Syphilis
105(2)
Symptoms and Complications
105(2)
Diagnosis and Treatment
107(1)
Less Common Bacterial STDs
107(1)
Herpes
108(4)
Symptoms---Primary Attack
109(1)
Recurrent Attacks
110(1)
Asymptomatic and Unrecognized Infections
110(1)
Serious Complications
110(1)
Diagnosis and Treatment
111(1)
The Personal Side of Herpes
111(1)
Hepatitis
112(1)
Genital Human Papillomavirus Infection
112(2)
Molluscum Contagiosum
114(1)
HIV Infection and AIDS
114(13)
HIV and the Body's Immune System
115(1)
Progression of HIV Infection
115(1)
Where and When Did Human Immunodeficiency Virus Originate?
116(1)
How Is HIV Spread?
117(1)
Who Has HIV/AIDS?
118(1)
Box 5-A: Cross-Cultural Perspectives/Sexuality and Health: AIDS in Africa: A Look Into the Future?
119(2)
The Human Side of AIDS
121(1)
Testing for HIV
121(1)
Treatment for HIV/AIDS: Hope and Limitations
122(1)
Public Reactions to AIDS
123(1)
Box 5-B: Sexuality and Health: Assessing Your Risk for Getting HIV/AIDS and Other Sexually Transmitted Diseases
124(2)
The Effect of AIDS on Sexual Behavior
126(1)
Parasitic Infestations
127(1)
Vaginitis
128(3)
Trichomoniasis (Trichomonal Vaginitis)
128(1)
Box 5-C: Sexuality and Health: Vaginal Health Care
129(1)
Moniliasis (or Candidiasis)
130(1)
Bacterial Vaginosis
130(1)
Cystitis and Prostatitis
131(1)
Practicing Safer Sex
131(3)
Box 5-D: Sexuality and Health: Impediments to Practicing Safer Sex
132(2)
What to Do and Where to Go if You Have an STD
134(1)
Positive Sexuality in the Era of AIDS
134(1)
Suggested Readings
135(1)
Study Guide
136(4)
Birth Control
140(35)
World Population
143(1)
Evaluating Different Birth Control Methods
144(2)
Contraceptive Myths
146(1)
Relatively Ineffective Methods
146(1)
Abstaining From Sex
147(1)
Lactational Amenorrhea Method
147(1)
Fertility Awareness: Abstaining From Sex During Ovulation
148(1)
Calendar Method
148(1)
Basal Body Temperature Method
148(1)
Billings Method (Cervical Mucus or Ovulation Method)
149(1)
Spermicides: Substances That Kill Sperm
149(1)
Barrier Methods: Preventing Sperm From Meeting Egg
150(6)
Male Condoms
150(3)
The Female Condom
153(1)
The Diaphragm
153(2)
The Cervical Cap and Lea's Shield
155(1)
The Contraceptive Sponge
155(1)
Barrier Methods and Spontaneity
156(1)
The IUD
156(1)
Hormonal Methods of Contraception
157(5)
Oral Contraception (The Birth Control Pill)
157(3)
Injectable Contraception (``The Shot'')
160(1)
Hormone Implants
160(1)
The Newest Hormone Contraceptives
161(1)
Emergency Contraception
162(1)
Voluntary Sterilization
162(3)
Box 6-A: Sexuality and Health: Contraceptive Methods That Help Prevent Sexually Transmitted Diseases
163(2)
Unwanted Pregnancies: The Final Options
165(3)
Abortion
166(2)
Future Technology
168(1)
Choosing a Contraceptive Method
169(2)
Suggested Readings
171(1)
Study Guide
171(4)
Pregnancy and Childbirth
175(31)
Conception and Implantation
176(2)
Problems With Implantation
177(1)
Pregnancy
178(4)
The First Trimester---The Mother
178(1)
The First Trimester---The Embryo/Fetus
178(1)
The Second Trimester---The Mother
179(1)
The Second Trimester---The Fetus
179(1)
The Third Trimester---The Mother
179(1)
The Third Trimester---The Fetus
179(1)
Sexual Intercourse During Pregnancy
179(3)
Complications of Pregnancy
182(4)
Diseases
182(1)
Toxemia of Pregnancy
183(1)
Smoking
183(1)
Alcohol
183(1)
Cocaine
184(1)
Other Drugs
184(1)
Rh Incompatibility
184(1)
Detection of Problems in Pregnancy
184(1)
Fetal Surgery
185(1)
Miscarriages (Spontaneous Abortions)
185(1)
Nutrition and Exercise During Pregnancy
186(1)
Preparing for Childbirth
186(4)
The Lamaze Method
187(2)
The Bradley Method
189(1)
The Leboyer Method
189(1)
Home Birth, Birthing Rooms and Centers, and Modern Midwifery
189(1)
Anesthetics or ``Natural'' Childbirth?
190(1)
Childbirth
190(2)
True Versus False Labor
190(1)
Stages of Labor
191(1)
Episiotomy and Prepping
192(1)
Problems With Childbirth
192(2)
Breech Births
192(1)
Placenta Previa
193(1)
Cesarean Sections
193(1)
Preterm Infants
193(1)
Afterwards
194(2)
Breast-Feeding the Baby
194(1)
Postpartum Depression
195(1)
Sexual Intercourse After Birth
195(1)
New Responsibilities
196(1)
Spacing Pregnancies
196(1)
Infertility and Impaired Fecundity
197(4)
Infertility in Men
197(1)
Infertility in Women
198(1)
Assisted Reproductive Technology
199(1)
Surrogate Mothers
200(1)
Delayed Childbearing and Assisted Reproductive Technology
200(1)
Superfertility
201(1)
Suggested Readings
201(1)
Study Guide
202(4)
Communicating About Sex
206(22)
Talking With Your Partner About Sexual Differences and Problems
207(8)
Why Is It Difficult to Talk About Sex?
207(1)
Box 8-A: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Ethnic Differences in Communication Patterns
208(1)
How Can My Partner and I Get Used to Talking About Sex?
209(1)
What if I Am Uncomfortable With the Language of Sex---What Words Should I Use?
209(1)
When (and Where) Should I Try to Talk to My Partner?
209(1)
How Should I Approach My Partner With Concerns About Our Sexual Relationship?
210(1)
What if I Think That My Partner Is to Blame---Can I Ever Complain?
210(1)
How Should I Express My Needs and Desires?
211(1)
How Can I Find Out About My Partner's Desires and Needs?
211(1)
Is Listening Important? If So, How Can I Become a Better Listener?
212(1)
Is It Possible to Communicate Nonverbally?
213(1)
Dealing With Anger and Conflict: An Example
213(1)
If I Want My Partner to Change and I Follow These Guidelines, How Soon Can I Expect to See a Change?
214(1)
What if We Cannot Agree?
214(1)
In the Future: Talking With Your Children About Sex
215(7)
Which Parent Should Talk With the Children?
216(1)
Does Telling Children About Sex Lead Them to Do It?
216(1)
Why Should I Talk to My Child About Sex?
216(1)
Will a Single ``Birds and Bees'' Talk Suffice?
217(1)
When Should I Start Talking With My Child About Sexuality?
217(1)
What Should I Tell My Children About AIDS and Other STDs?
218(1)
How Detailed Should Sex Discussions Be?
218(2)
What if I Feel Embarrassed?
220(1)
How Should I Talk With My Child?
220(1)
What About Morals? Aren't They Important Too?
221(1)
Can My Behavior Affect My Child's Attitudes and Behavior?
221(1)
How Do I Know if I Have Succeeded?
222(1)
Hope for the Future
222(1)
Box 8-B: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Ethnic Differences Within the United States in Parent-Child Communication
223(1)
Suggested Readings for Couples
223(1)
Suggested Sex Education References to Help Parents
224(1)
Suggested Sex Education References for Children
224(1)
Study Guide
225(3)
Sexuality as a Social Concept
228(14)
Sexuality as an Evolving Concept
229(3)
Sexuality of Women
229(1)
Sexuality of Children
230(1)
Sex Education
231(1)
Sexual Socialization: Agents
232(6)
Religion
232(1)
The Media
233(5)
Sexual Socialization: Cause and Effect?
238(2)
Suggested Readings
240(1)
Study Guide
240(2)
Becoming a Woman/Becoming a Man: Gender Identity and Gender Roles
242(30)
Biological Influences on Gender Identity
243(1)
The Role of Chromosomes
243(1)
The Role of Hormones
244(1)
Sexual Differentiation of the Brain
244(1)
Variations in Development: Intersexed Individuals
244(4)
Chromosome Variations
244(2)
Hormonal Variations
246(1)
Attempts to Reassign Sex at Birth
247(1)
Gender and Sex as Social Constructs
248(1)
Gender Identity ``Disorder''
249(3)
Psychological Theories of Gender Identity Development
252(2)
Freudian Theory
252(1)
Social Learning Theory
252(1)
Cognitive-Developmental Theory
253(1)
Gender Roles
254(14)
Theories of Gender Role
254(1)
Box 10-A: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Gender Roles
255(1)
Gender-Role Development During Childhood
256(3)
Gender-Role Development in Children Raised in Single-Parent Households
259(1)
Role of the Media
260(1)
What Causes Developmental Gender Differences?
260(1)
Gender-Role Development in Adulthood
260(2)
Gender Roles and Sexual Relations
262(1)
Box 10-B: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: The Native American Two-Spirit and Samoan Fa'afafine
263(1)
Sociocultural Theories of Gender-Role Development
264(2)
Box 10-C: Opposing Points of View: Why I Want a Wife/Why I Want a Husband
266(2)
Suggested Readings
268(1)
Study Guide
268(4)
Sexual Orientation
272(25)
Prevalence of Homosexuality and Bisexuality
273(1)
Defining Sexual Orientation: Another Look
274(1)
Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Gender Roles
275(1)
The Origins of Sexual Orientation
276(5)
Psychoanalytic Explanations
276(1)
Other Psychosocial Explanations
277(1)
Biological Explanations
278(2)
Conclusions
280(1)
Homosexuality
281(12)
History of Attitudes About Homosexuality
281(1)
Sexual Prejudice Today
282(3)
Coming Out
285(2)
Homosexual Life Styles and Relations
287(2)
Homosexuals and Marriage
289(1)
Homosexuals as Parents
289(2)
Box 11-A: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Homosexuality in Other Cultures
291(1)
Media Portrayal of Homosexuals
292(1)
Can (Should) Sexual Orientation Be Changed?
293(1)
National Support Groups
294(1)
Suggested Readings
294(1)
Study Guide
294(3)
Life-Span Sexual Development
297(35)
Early Infancy (Ages 0-1)
297(1)
Early Childhood (Ages 2-6)
298(2)
The Initial School-Age Years (Ages 7-11)
300(1)
Puberty (Ages 7-15)
301(3)
Changes in Girls
301(1)
Changes in Boys
302(1)
Precocious and Delayed Puberty
303(1)
Sexual Behavior
304(1)
Adolescence (Ages 13-17)
304(5)
Masturbation
305(1)
Petting
305(1)
Sexual Intercourse
306(1)
Peer Pressure
307(2)
Emerging Adulthood (Ages 18-25)
309(1)
Young Adulthood (Adults Aged 26-39)
310(6)
Marriage
311(1)
Living Together (Cohabitation)
311(1)
Single Parenthood
312(1)
Extramarital Sex---In Supposedly Monogamous Marriages
312(1)
Extramarital Sex---Consensual Arrangements
313(1)
Box 12-A: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: How Do People Select a Mate?
314(2)
Middle Age (Ages 40-59)
316(8)
Frequency of Sexual Intercourse
317(1)
Loss of a Mate by Divorce or Death
318(1)
Female Sexuality: Physical Changes With Age
319(2)
Box 12-B: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Menopause in Different Cultures
321(1)
Female Sexuality: Behavior
322(1)
Male Sexuality: Physical Changes With Age
322(1)
Male Sexuality: Behavior
323(1)
The Elderly Years (Age 60+)
324(4)
Box 12-C: Sexuality and Health: Sex and Heart Attacks
326(2)
Suggested Readings
328(1)
Study Guide
328(4)
Adult Sexual Behaviors and Attitudes
332(20)
What Is Normal?
333(1)
Masturbation
333(3)
Attitudes About Masturbation
333(2)
Incidence of Masturbation
335(1)
Methods of Masturbation
335(1)
Functions of Masturbation
336(1)
Nocturnal Orgasms
336(3)
Box 13-A: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Ethnic Differences in Sexual Behavior
337(2)
Sexual Fantasies
339(1)
Coital Positions and Locations
340(4)
Oral-Genital Sex
344(3)
Box 13-B: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Positions of Sexual Intercourse
345(2)
Anal Stimulation
347(1)
Preferred Sexual Behaviors
348(1)
The Sexually Healthy Person
348(1)
Suggested Readings
349(1)
Study Guide
349(3)
Love and Relationships
352(26)
History of Romantic Love
353(1)
Friendship Versus Romantic Love
354(2)
How Do I Know if This Is Really Love?
356(1)
Companionate Love
357(1)
Sex Without Love
357(1)
Love Without Sex
358(2)
Unconditional Love
358(1)
Box 14-A: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Love and Marriage
359(1)
Prerequisites for Love
360(1)
Self-Acceptance
360(1)
Self-Disclosure
360(1)
Theories of Love
361(1)
Attachment Theory of Love
361(1)
Robert Sternberg's Triangular Theory of Love
362(1)
John Lee's ``Many Colors of Love''
363(4)
The Primary Colors
364(1)
The Secondary Colors
364(2)
Finding a Good Match
366(1)
Which Theory Is Correct?
367(1)
Jealousy
367(1)
Maintaining a Relationship
368(6)
The Decline of Passion
369(1)
Growing Together/Growing Apart: Will Companionate Love Develop?
369(3)
Coping With Breakups
372(1)
Becoming More Intimate
373(1)
Suggested Readings
374(1)
Study Guide
374(4)
Sexual Problems and Therapy
378(27)
Individual Differences and Relationship Conflicts
379(2)
Different Expectations
379(1)
Different Assumptions
379(1)
Differences in Desire
379(2)
Differences in Preferred Behaviors
381(1)
Relationship Conflict
381(1)
Sexual Therapy
381(1)
Sexual Therapy Techniques
382(2)
Medical History
382(1)
Sexual History
382(1)
Systematic Desensitization
383(1)
Self-Awareness and Masturbation
383(1)
Sensate Focus
383(1)
Specific Exercises
384(1)
Male Sexual Problems
384(8)
Classification of Sexual Disorders
384(1)
Sexual Desire Disorders: Hypoactive Sexual Desire and Sexual Aversion
384(1)
Sexual Arousal Disorder: Erectile Disorder
385(5)
Orgasmic Disorders: Premature Ejaculation
390(1)
Male Orgasmic Disorder
391(1)
Sexual Pain Disorders
392(1)
Female Sexual Problems
392(7)
Classification of Sexual Disorders
392(1)
Sexual Desire Disorders: Hypoactive Sexual Desire and Sexual Aversion
393(1)
Sexual Arousal Disorder
394(1)
Female Orgasmic Disorder
394(4)
Sexual Pain Disorder
398(1)
Hypersexuality: Compulsion, Addiction, or Myth?
399(3)
Sexual Problems Among Homosexuals
401(1)
Box 15-A: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Sex Therapy
401(1)
Suggested Readings
402(1)
Study Guide
402(3)
Paraphilias and Sexual Variants
405(19)
Historical Perspective
406(2)
Multiple and Related Paraphilias
407(1)
The Courtship Disorders
408(3)
Voyeurism
408(1)
Exhibitionism
409(1)
Obscene Phone Callers
410(1)
Frotteurism
411(1)
Pedophilia
411(1)
Fetishism, Transvestism, and Related Paraphilias
412(4)
Fetishism
412(1)
Transvestism
413(1)
Related Fetish-Like Paraphilias
414(2)
Sadomasochism
416(2)
Other Paraphilias
418(1)
Paraphilias and the Internet
418(1)
What Causes Paraphilias?
418(2)
Therapy
420(1)
Suggested Readings
421(1)
Study Guide
421(3)
Sexual Victimization: Rape, Coercion, Harassment, and Abuse of Children
424(41)
Rape
425(18)
Historical Perspective
425(1)
Rape Statistics
426(1)
Some Characteristics of Rapists
426(1)
Date Rape and Sexual Coercion
427(3)
Rape in Marriage
430(1)
Box 17-A: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Rape
431(1)
Gang Rape
432(1)
Statutory Rape
432(1)
Same-Sex Sexual Assault and Coercion
433(1)
Can a Man Be Raped by a Woman?
434(1)
Explanations of Rape
434(3)
Misconceptions About Rape
437(2)
Reactions to Rape
439(1)
Reactions of the Partner
440(1)
Box 17-B: Sexuality and Health: Sexual Victimization, Pregnancy, and Sexually Transmitted Diseases
441(1)
What Happens When a Rape Is Reported?
441(1)
Preventing Rape
442(1)
Sexual Harassment
443(3)
Some Causes of Sexual Harassment
445(1)
Sexual Harassment of College Students
445(1)
How to Deal With Sexual Harassment
446(1)
Sexual Abuse of Children
446(7)
What Is Child Sexual Abuse?
447(1)
Who Molests Children?
447(3)
Female Perpetrators of Child Sexual Abuse
450(1)
Effects of Abuse on the Children
451(1)
Recovered (False?) Memory Syndrome
452(1)
Incest
453(5)
Incest Between Siblings
453(1)
Parent-Child Incest
454(1)
Effects of Incest on Children
455(1)
Family Dynamics
456(1)
Box 17-C: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Incestuous Inbreeding---A Universal Taboo?
457(1)
Preventing and Dealing With Child Sexual Abuse
458(1)
Prosecution of Sexual Offenders
458(1)
Rape
458(1)
Child Sexual Abuse
458(1)
Conviction of Sex Offenders
459(1)
Therapy
459(1)
Therapy for Rapists
459(1)
Therapy for Child Molesters
459(1)
Therapy for Victims
460(1)
Suggested Readings
460(1)
Study Guide
461(4)
Sex and the Law
465(20)
Prostitution
466(5)
Definition and Types of Prostitution
467(1)
Characteristics of Prostitutes
468(2)
The Customer
470(1)
Prostitution and the Law
470(1)
Box 18-A: Sexuality and Health: Prostitution and the AIDS Virus
471(1)
Pornography
471(9)
Uses of Sexually Explicit Material
473(1)
Effects of Nonviolent Sexually Explicit Material
474(1)
Effects of Violent and Degrading Sexually Explicit Material
475(1)
Sexually Explicit Material Involving Children
476(1)
Complete Legalization or Censorship?
477(3)
Laws Against Fornication, Adultery, and Sodomy
480(2)
Box 18-B: Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Illegal Sex Around the World
481(1)
Suggested Readings
482(1)
Study Guide
482(3)
Glossary 485(15)
Resources 500(3)
Credits 503(1)
Answers to Questions 504(7)
References 511(40)
Index 551

Excerpts

There has never been a greater need for human sexuality education than at the beginning of the 21st century. Unfortunately, with the AIDS crisis and high teenage pregnancy rate, a lot of important information has been presented in a negative way. Although one of my goals in writing this book is for students to understand the relevant facts in order to make responsible decisions in their daily lives, an equally important goal has been to present the information in a warm, non-threatening way that leaves students with positive feelings about sex and their own sexuality. When I began to write this text I recalled my students' complaints about the dryness, sterility, and length of books I had used previously. So with them in mind, I tried to create a book that was factual and thorough, yet readable and interesting. Thus I have included numerous case studies (most contributed by my own students!) to supplement and make more personal the substantial coverage of scientific studies. Although my writing style is purposely conversational, I have worked hard to maintain the scientific foundation of my presentation. This fifth edition has well over 2,000 references for students who wish to use the book as a resource. In addition, the section on HIV/AIDS is as thorough and up-to-date as can be found in any human sexuality textbook. The final test for any textbook is whether or not students will read it, learn from it, and enjoy it. As a result of feedback from students and reviewers, the book has continually evolved in an attempt to create an ever-better product. The fifth edition has major reorganization of the material in Chapters 4 (Sexual Responses) and 15 (Sexual Problems and Therapy) to better reflect the many contributions of feminist scholars, and also to Chapter 16 (Paraphilias) to better show the relationship among the many paraphiliac behaviors. Chapters 8 (Communicating about Sex) and 9 (Sexuality as a Social Concept) were expanded a bit, and all chapters were thoroughly updated. In addition, Prentice Hall and I have worked hard to improve the illustration program. The cost of textbooks to students has become an increasing concern to many. Besides the cost of the primary textbook, already prohibitive for some, there is the added cost of a student's study guide. However, because it has been the goal of Prentice Hall and myself to publish a high-quality textbook at the lowest possible expense to the students, the Student Study Guide is included at the end of each chapter at no additional cost to the student.


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