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Hydrology and Floodplain Analysis,9780130322227
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Hydrology and Floodplain Analysis

by ; ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130322227

ISBN10:
0130322229
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2008
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $170.00
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Summary

For undergraduate and graduate courses in Hydrology. This text offers a clear and up-to-date presentation of fundamental concepts and design methods required to understand hydrology and floodplain analysis. It addresses the computational emphasis of modern hydrology and provides a balanced approach to important applications in watershed analysis, floodplain computation, flood control, urban hydrology, stormwater design, and computer modeling. Includes HEC-HMS, HEC-RAS, and SWMM models plus GIS and radar rainfall.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Hydrologic Principles
1(78)
Introduction to Hydrology
1(6)
Hydrologic Cycle
7(6)
Weather Systems
13(11)
Precipitation
24(14)
Evaporation and Et
38(9)
Infiltration Loss
47(6)
Streamflow and the Hydrograph
53(2)
Hydrologic Measurement
55(24)
Summary
64(2)
Problems
66(9)
References
75(4)
Hydrologic Analysis
79(89)
Watershed Concepts
79(4)
Rainfall-Runoff
83(2)
Hydrograph Analysis
85(12)
Unit Hydrograph Theory
97(16)
Synthetic Unit Hydrograph Development
113(17)
Applications of Unit Hydrographs
130(4)
Conceptual Models
134(5)
Snowfall and Snowmelt
139(8)
Green and Ampt Infiltration Method
147(21)
Summary
155(1)
Problems
156(8)
References
164(4)
Frequency Analysis
168(71)
Introduction
168(7)
Probability Concepts
175(1)
Random Variables and Probability Distributions
176(11)
Return Period or Recurrence Interval
187(3)
Common Probabilistic Models
190(18)
Graphical Presentation of Data
208(14)
Related Topics
222(17)
Summary
224(1)
Problems
224(11)
References
235(4)
Flood Routing
239(74)
Hydrologic and Hydraulic Routing
239(7)
Hydrologic River Routing
246(9)
Hydrologic Reservoir Routing
255(12)
Governing Equations for Hydraulic River Routing
267(3)
Movement of a Flood Wave
270(4)
Kinematic Wave Routing
274(16)
Hydraulic River Routing
290(23)
Summary
302(1)
Problems
302(8)
References
310(3)
Hydrologic Simulation Models
313(56)
Introduction to Hydrologic Models
313(3)
Steps in Watershed Modeling
316(2)
Description of Major Hydrologic Models
318(2)
HEC-1 Flood Hydrograph Package
320(10)
Input and Output Data for HEC-1
330(9)
Introduction to HEC-HMS
339(10)
HEC-HMS Watershed Analysis: Case Study
349(20)
Summary
363(1)
Problems
364(3)
References
367(2)
Urban Hydrology
369(88)
Characteristics of Urban Hydrology
369(6)
Review of Physical Processes
375(8)
Rainfall Analysis
383(11)
Methods for Quantity Analysis
394(15)
Sewer System Hydraulics
409(4)
Control Options
413(6)
Operational Computer Models
419(4)
Case Study
423(34)
Summary
434(1)
Problems
434(14)
References
448(9)
Floodplain Hydraulics
457(63)
Uniform Flow
457(2)
Iniform Flow Computations
459(7)
Specific Energy and Critical Flow
466(3)
Occurrence of Critical Depth
469(1)
Nonuniform Flow or Gradually Varied Flow
470(1)
Gradually Varied Flow Equations
471(6)
Classification of Water Surface Profiles
477(4)
Hydraulic Jump
481(2)
Introduction to the HEC-2 Model
483(1)
Theoretical Basis for HEC-2
484(2)
Basic Data Requirements
486(3)
Optional HEC-2 Capabilities
489(1)
Input and Output Features
490(8)
Example of HEC-2 Input
498(4)
Introduction to HEC-RAS
502(18)
Summary
514(1)
Problems
514(5)
References
519(1)
Ground Water Hydrology
520(65)
Introduction
520(3)
Properties of Ground Water
523(6)
Ground Water Movement
529(5)
Flow Nets
534(2)
General Flow Equations
536(4)
Dupuit Equation
540(4)
Streamlines and Equipotential Lines
544(1)
Unsaturated Flow
545(1)
Steady-State Well Hydraulics
546(6)
Unsteady Well Hydraulics
552(14)
Water Wells
566(3)
Ground Water Modeling Techniques
569(16)
Summary
579(1)
Problems
580(4)
References
584(1)
Design Issues in Hydrology
585(42)
Introduction
587(1)
Design Rainfalls
588(4)
Small Watershed Design
592(8)
Design Hydrographs for Pipes, Overland Flows, and Channels
600(7)
Detention Pond Design for Flood Control
607(5)
Floodplain Analysis and Design at the Woodlands---Case Study
612(15)
Summary
622(1)
Problems
622(3)
References
625(2)
GIS Applications in Hydrology
627(21)
Introduction to GIS
627(2)
General GIS Concepts
629(5)
Digital Representation Hydrologic Parameters
634(2)
Digital Representation of Topography
636(3)
GIS-Based Hydrology and Hydraulics
639(5)
Common GIS Software Programs
644(4)
Summary
646(1)
References
646(2)
Radar Rainfall Applications in Hydrology
648(34)
Introduction
648(5)
Radar Estimation of Rainfall
653(7)
WSR-88D Radar System
660(5)
Real-Time WSR-88D Precipitation Products
665(5)
Radar to Gage Calibration
670(3)
Linkages with Hydrologic Modeling
673(9)
HEC-HMS
673(6)
Summary
679(1)
References
680(2)
Floodplain Management Issues in Hydrology
682(32)
Introduction
682(4)
The Era of Federal Structural Flood Control Measures
686(3)
The Federal Emergency Management Agency
689(1)
Floodplain Management Issues
690(1)
Structural Methods of Flood Control
691(4)
The Flood Control Paradox
695(2)
Nonstructural Methods of Flood Control
697(4)
Clear Creek Case Study: A GIS-Based Approach
701(13)
Summary
710(1)
References
711(3)
Appendix A Symbols and Notation 714(4)
Appendix B Metric Conversion Factors (SI Units to U.S. Customary) 718(2)
Appendix C Properties of Water 720(3)
Appendix D Normal Distribution Tables 723(3)
Appendix E Useful Hydrology-Related Internet Links 726(9)
Glossary 735(18)
Index 753

Excerpts

The field of hydrology is of fundamental importance to civil and environmental engineers, hydrogeologists, and other earth scientists because of the environmental significance of water supply, major floods and droughts and their management, drainage and urban stormwater issues, flooplain management, and water quality impacts. This text was written to address the computational emphasis of modern hydrology at an undergraduate or graduate level and to provide a balanced approach to important applications in hydrologic engineering and science. THE EVOLUTION OF HYDROLOGY In the 1970s, a large number of sophisticated computer models were created by government agencies and university groups to address hydrologic prediction, flood control, hydraulic design, water resources engineering, contaminant transport, water quality management, and water supply. During the 1980s, several of the most comprehensive and best-documented computer programs became routine operating procedures for the detailed hydrologic analysis of watersheds. Many state and federal water programs rely heavily on the application of hydrologic models for planning and decision-making. Increasing use and sophistication of personal computers in the 1990s further revolutionized the daily practice of hydrology. Hundreds of small programs have been written to ease the computational burden on the hydrologist or engineer, and many of the earlier hydrologic models have newer versions designed to run on new and powerful personal computers. The availability of Internet access worldwide (since approximately 1994) has revolutionized the usefulness and accessibility of hydrologic data and models. The impact of transferring online data from governmental and scientific sources to the practicing hydrologist or student has been amazing. The evolving interactions of hydrologic data, digital terrain models, and mapping software with hydrologic modeling have been phenomenal. A list of important web sites and links currently used routinely in hydrology is contained in Appendix E. ORGANIZATION OF THE TEXT The text is divided into three main sections. The first section, consisting of the first four chapters, covers traditional topics in hydrology such as: (1) weather, precipitation, evaporation, infiltration, hydrologic measurement, (2) rainfall-runoff analysis, (3) frequency analysis, and (4) flood routing methods. These topics provide the student with a comprehensive view of the overall hydrologic cycle in nature as well as the problem of engineering design within certain flood limits. Numerous worked examples are used to highlight theory, problem definition, solution methods, and computational approaches. Spreadsheets are used throughout. The third edition of the text includes expanded coverage and new examples in Chapters 1 through 4. The second section, Chapters 5 through 9, is designed to apply hydrologic theory and available hydrologic modeling techniques to several areas of engineering hydrology and design--watershed analysis, floodplain delineation, and urban stormwater. The latest methods and computer models are emphasized in enough detail for practical use, and detailed examples and case studies are provided. The third edition of the text updates earlier hydrologic models with new versions as of 2001, such as HEC-HMS and HEC-RAS from the U.S. Army Hydrologic Engineering Center, and the latest improvements to the EPA model SWMM. Chapter 5, Hydrologic Simulation Models, presents modern methods for simulating rainfall and runoff, flood hydrograph prediction, and flood control options in a watershed. The HEC-1 and HEC-HMS models are highlighted with detailed examples. Chapter 6, Urban Hydrology, presents standard methods and reviews available computer models for pipe and open channel storm drainage systems. The Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is highlighted as the most comprehensive urban runoff model available today. Chapter


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