9780131126206

Identifying and Exploring Security Essentials

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780131126206

  • ISBN10:

    0131126202

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2003-10-06
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

This new book gives readers a unique approach to the study of security issues, useful for either those already in the field or before they actually find themselves employed in a specific security-related job. Written in a clear, easy-to-understand style, this book gives readers the opportunity to look at security from various perspectives; it grounds them firmly in the history and fundamentals of the field, as well as prepares them for today's most difficult security challenges.Topics comprehensively covered in this book include: the use of technology in physical security; understanding security in the context of setting; security scenarios; public and private police relations; legal liability; internal resource identification; external community connections; and more.Homeland security means security issues arenotjust for security practitioners anymore. Everyone should beactivelyeducating themselves about security-related subjects, and become familiar with security needs in various target environments. As such, this book is not only for those in the security field, but for others such as school principals, hospital workers, office managers and business executives, and owners and managers of all types of businesses.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
PART I REVIEWING THE BASICS
1(118)
Introducing Security Essentials: A Prelude
5(1)
The Security Body of Knowledge: An Emerging Academic Discipline?
6(11)
What is Security?
7(4)
Professionalizing the Security Industry
11(1)
Security Education
12(3)
Moving Beyond Anecdotal Research: A Focus on Method
15(2)
Emphasizing a Sense of Place
17(5)
Site-Specific Attention and Attention to Security Themes
18(1)
Security as a Relative Concept
19(3)
Distinguishing between Crime and the Fear of Crime
22(1)
Links with Law Enforcement: A Tenuous Relationship?
23(6)
Definitions of Public and Private Space
25(2)
Responsibilities for Self-Protection: A Personal Security Issue or a Police Issue?
27(2)
The Challenges of Integration: Many Levels
29(2)
Assessing Security in Everyday Life
30(1)
Security as a Concept for the Powerful
31(1)
Identifying Information as Essential
31(1)
Conclusion
32(5)
Review Questions
34(1)
Discussion Questions
34(3)
A History of Private Security: A Pervasive Enterprise
37(27)
Early Security and the Development of Laws
40(9)
Prehistoric Security
41(4)
Development of Laws to Protect Citizens
45(2)
Early England
47(2)
Early America: 1700s to 1800s
49(4)
The Next 100 Years
53(3)
World Wars I and II
54(1)
Post-World War II
55(1)
September 11, 2001
56(1)
The Future of Security Is in Planning for Tomorrow
56(1)
Conclusion
57(7)
Review Questions
59(1)
Discussion Questions
60(4)
Identifying the Essentials
64(27)
Beginning with the Basics: Ever Changing and Never Ending
68(1)
Studies In Human Behavior: An Essential Need for Security
69(2)
Outlining and Defining ``Security''
71(3)
Creating and Maintaining a Stable and Predictable Environment
72(1)
Threats, Risk and Vulnerabilities
73(1)
Introducing Essential Security Tools: Identifying Threats, Risk, and Vulnerabilities
74(9)
Threats and Related Risk Levels
74(6)
Identifying Vulnerabilities and Determining Countermeasures
80(2)
A Final, All-Important Term
82(1)
A Few Miscellaneous Essentials
83(6)
Proactive vs. Reactive Response
83(1)
Contract Officers versus Proprietary Officers
84(1)
Contract Outsourcing Decisions
84(5)
Conclusion
89(2)
Review Questions
89(1)
Discussion Questions
89(2)
Studying Security Threats and the Related Risk Levels
91(11)
Prison Inmate Escapes from Private Transportation Firm
92(2)
Tragic Portent: Slain Doctor Predicted Violent Abortion Protest
94(1)
Turkey Farm Cries Foul over Parrots: Disease Threatens Pt. Arena Ranch
95(3)
``Biotech Terroist'' Threats Taken Seriously: Iowa State, Pioneer Hi-Bred May Be Targets
98(2)
Teamsters Strike Overnight Trucking
100(2)
A Prevention System Overview: Defining the Overall Security Objective
102(17)
Revisiting Risk
105(1)
Risk Management Options
106(4)
The Security Objective
110(3)
The Overall Security Objective: A Seamless, Integrated Security Design
113(2)
Conclusion
115(4)
Review Questions
116(1)
Discussion Questions
116(3)
PART II INTERNAL RESOURCES AND INTEGRATION: IDENTIFYING RESOURCES FROM WITHIN
119(116)
Physical Security and Asset Protection
123(19)
Early Academic Efforts: Crime Prevention through Environmental Design
125(1)
Three Models for Discussing Physical Security
126(7)
The Three, Four, and Five Ds: The D Is for Defense
127(1)
Lines of Defense
128(3)
External and Internal Threats
131(2)
The Role of Physical Security in the Overall Security Objective
133(1)
Tools for a Basic Plan: Locks, Lights, Alarms, and Access Control
133(3)
Other Aspects of a Physical Security Plan
136(3)
Asset Protection
136(1)
The Use of Technology as/in Physical Security
137(1)
Security Procedures Manuals
138(1)
Conclusion
139(3)
Review Questions
139(1)
Discussion Questions
139(3)
Information and Computer Security
142(21)
Trade Secrets: Important Information in a Competitive Marketplace
143(4)
Computer Crime Enforcement: A Return to the Wild West
147(2)
Who Needs Computer Security?
149(1)
Computer Security Operations and Occupations
150(1)
Law Enforcement and Industry Respond
151(6)
Computer Security: A Scarce Resource
153(1)
Security Countermeasures
154(3)
Conclusion
157(6)
Review Questions
159(1)
Discussion Questions
159(4)
Personnel and Security Management
163(29)
The Role of Security in Personnel Matters
164(7)
Security Management
165(3)
Policies and Procedures: Enchancing Security from Within
168(2)
The Role of Technology in Personnel Security Concerns
170(1)
Maintaining Safe Working Conditions for Employees
171(6)
Workplace Violence
171(2)
Sexual Harassment and Discrimination
173(1)
Drug Use and Abuse
174(1)
Disruptive Employee Behavior
174(1)
Promoting Ethical Conduct
175(2)
Protecting Assets in the Target Environment
177(1)
Managing Security Personnel
178(9)
Determining the Structure of a Security Department
181(1)
A Guard No Longer
181(1)
Identifying Qualifications for Security Personnel
182(1)
Training and Supervising
183(1)
Equipment, Tactics, and Uniforms
184(3)
Conclusion
187(5)
Review Questions
188(1)
Discussion Questions
189(3)
Integration as the Centerpiece: Meeting Overall Security Objectives
192(21)
One-Dimensional Thinking: Restrictions No One Can Afford
193(3)
The Essence of Integration
196(5)
Know the Environment
196(2)
Know the Security Field
198(1)
Rely on Other Security Experts
199(2)
The Importance of an Integrated Security Design
201(8)
Integrating to Move outside of the Box
204(2)
A Model for Integration: It Is ``Magic''
206(3)
Conclusion
209(4)
Review Questions
210(1)
Discussion Questions
211(2)
A Sampling of Settings
213(22)
Using the Structure of the Text as a Guide
214(2)
The Selected Settings
214(2)
Target Environment: Hospital
216(2)
Target Environment: Airport
218(3)
School Security
221(3)
Bank Security
224(3)
Convenience Store Security
227(8)
PART III EXPLORING ESSENTIAL EXTERNAL CONNECTIONS
235(88)
Public and Private Police Interactions
237(33)
Public and Private Police Relations: A Dynamic Interaction
238(7)
Unhappy Associations from the Past
239(2)
Conflict Surrounding the Definition of Public and Private Space
241(1)
Securing Public Places: Who Provides Security?
242(3)
Who Is Qualified to Provide Security?
245(6)
Mistrust of Police---In Whatever Form
247(2)
Demand for Public Safety
249(2)
Market Demands Require Competitive Market Responses
251(6)
A Shift in Past Policing Practice
253(1)
Everyone Has a Role to Play in Personal Protection
253(1)
High-Profile Protection
254(3)
Acknowledging Essential Connections: Developing Respect among Professionals
257(3)
Ethics
257(1)
The Importance of Public Relations
258(1)
A Professional Presence and Order Maintenance
258(1)
Random and/or Structured Patrols
258(1)
Community Resource Officers
259(1)
Structured Emergency Response Coordination
259(1)
Targeting Areas of Public Concern
259(1)
Some Questions Remain
260(3)
Conclusion
263(7)
Review Questions
264(1)
Discussion Questions
264(6)
Legal Liability Issues
270(17)
Foundations of Law
271(7)
Basic Organization of Law: Criminal, Civil, and Administrative Functions
272(1)
Federal, State, and Local Regulation of the Security Industry
273(2)
Employee Rights Granted through Legal Protections
275(2)
Primer in Basic Crime Classifications
277(1)
Legal Authority of the Security Professional
278(1)
Basics Concepts of Criminal Procedure and Their Application to Private Security
278(3)
Stop and Frisk
279(1)
Arrest, Detention, and False Imprisonment
279(1)
Search and Seizure/Probable Cause
280(1)
Reasonable Expectation of Privacy
281(1)
Use of Force
281(1)
Tort Law
281(2)
Miscellaneous Legal Issues
283(1)
Nondelegable Duty
283(1)
Color of Law
283(1)
Conclusion
284(3)
Review Questions
284(1)
Discussion Questions
285(2)
Preparing an Emergency Plan and a Disaster Repsonse
287(16)
Defining Safety and Security Issues
289(1)
The Biggest Disaster Is Not Being Prepared
290(9)
A Documented Emergency Protocol
299(1)
Conclusion
300(3)
Review Questions
301(1)
Discussion Questions
301(2)
Securing Tomorrow: Drafting the Future of Public Safety
303(16)
Making a Case for Integrated External Resources
304(7)
Case Study 1: Compstat and Integrated Community-Based Applications
304(4)
Case Study 2: Ridgedale Mall, Minnetonka, Minnesota
308(1)
Case Study 3: Retailers Protection Association, St. Paul, Minnesota
309(2)
Expanding Agendas for Law Enforcement?
311(2)
The Role of Private Security within the Criminal Justice Community
313(1)
The Future of Security
314(1)
Conclusion
315(4)
Review Questions
315(1)
Discussion Questions
316(3)
Review of the Target Environments
319(4)
Appendix A Basic Security Plan 323(19)
Appendix B Company X Request for Proposal: Contract Security Service Specifications 342(17)
Appendix C Protection Officer Code of Ethics 359(6)
Appendix D Security Time Line 365(8)
Index 373

Excerpts

This text is offered to those interested in developing a better understanding of security and security-related concerns. On September 11, 2001 we saw clearly how security-related concerns affect everyone. The importance of the ideas presented here have been eerily illustrated in horrific fashion by the events on that day and in the days since. As a result, how we think about security concerns as a nation has changed in the United States and throughout the world. Security as a discipline and as a popular concern has been changed and awareness everywhere has been heightened. The security-related themes presented here were originally organized for students in an upper-level security course. The information included here, however, will prove useful to anyone interested in security. Readers will see how to begin thinking strategically not only about security options but also about how to assess their own environment to determine which option will be most effective for them under what circumstances. More than a "how-to" book, this is a "how-to-think-about" book. After reviewing and integrating years of security-related information from various security texts, articles, and trade journals, teaching security and crime prevention classes, and talking with security professionals, I came to realize that people (including security professionals) often use the same words and terms to describe different security-related issues and concepts. This can be confusing. Furthermore, the few social science research studies that have been done in this area suggest that even security practitioners do not agree about whatsecuritymeans. In an effort to provide better service to students, I began offering them a collection of ideas, rather than espousing one particular definition. I decided to focus on providing a definition supplemented by a presentation of, and discussion about, general security concepts. This text is the result of my effort to take various uses of security-related terms, concepts, and activities and synthesize these ideas into what I am calling "security essentials." One factor motivating me to put together a textbook was my own frustration when reading and researching within the field. My initial goal was to find a means by which I could define terms easily for students who were just learning the field while at the same time not create confusion for them when they began reading security materials on their own. One of my concerns, however, is the importance of organizing and discussing the material in a way that makes sense to both researchers and academic types and security practitioners. The reader should be aware that similar efforts to synthesize and prioritize security-related material are under way from within one of the largest, and perhaps most well-known, international security organizations, the American Society for Industrial Security (ASIS). Although I decided this text should reflect my academic leanings, I also try to acknowledge the importance of the practitioner perspective. Information from the ASIS organization's education committee should also prove useful. My hope is that by making comparisons between the efforts of academics and the efforts of practitioners, we can move a step closer to a fuller integration of what have traditionally been separate orientations to security-related information. Some security concepts discussed throughout this text can and should be applied to any and all settings, but it is essential to highlight the fact that each secured environment is different. For students, this is a critical concept. No one book can speak to every security issue. People who look exclusively to textbooks for their security solutions are not utilizing the one thing that they may know the most about: the specific and specialized environmental conditions in the "target environment," or the setting they seek to protect. Security professionals responsible for a specific envir

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