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Improvising Medicine: An African Oncology Ward in an Emerging Cancer Epidemic

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780822353423

ISBN10:
0822353423
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/1/2012
Publisher(s):
DUKE UNIVERSITY PRESS

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This is the 1st edition with a publication date of 8/1/2012.
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Summary

In Improvised MedicineJulie Livingston tells the story of Botswana's only dedicated cancer ward, located in its capital city of Gaborone. This affecting ethnography follows patients, their relatives, and ward staff as a cancer epidemic emerged in Botswana. The epidemic is part of an ongoing surge in cancers across the global south; the stories of Botswana's oncology ward dramatize the human stakes and intellectual and institutional challenges of an epidemic that will shape the future of global health. They convey the contingencies of high-tech medicine in a hospital where vital machines are often broken, drugs go in and out of stock, and bed space is always at a premium. They also reveal cancer as something that happens betweenpeople. Serious illness, care, pain, disfigurement, and even death emerge as deeply social experiences. Livingston describes the cancer ward as a constellation of bureaucracy, vulnerability, power, biomedical science, mortality, and hope that shapes contemporary experience in southern Africa. Her ethnography is a profound reflection on the social orchestration of hope and futility in an African hospital, as well as the politics and economics of healthcare in Africa and of palliation and disfigurement across the global south.


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