9780231117852

Indians, Markets, and Rainforests: Theory, Methods, Analysis

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780231117852

  • ISBN10:

    023111785X

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2001-07-01
  • Publisher: COLUMBIA UNIV PRESS

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $40.00 Save up to $4.00
  • Rent Book $36.00
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Rental and eBook copies of this book are not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

This book addresses two important and related questions: does participation in a market economy help or hurt indigenous peoples and how does it affect the conservation of tropical rainforest flora and fauna? Oddly, there have been few quantitative studies that have addressed these issues.Ricardo Godoy's research takes an important step toward rectifying this oversight by investigating five different lowland Amerindian societies of tropical Latin America -- all of which are experiencing deep changes as they modernize. Godoy examines the effect of markets on a broad range of areas including health, conservation of flora and fauna, leisure, folk knowledge, reciprocity, and private time preference. He concludes that, contrary to considerable anthropological theory, the effect of markets on the quality of life and the rainforest are often unclear or benign. Godoy uses multivariate techniques to examine the changes modernization has had on many indicators of the quality of life and the environment and concludes that the seeds of socioeconomic differentiation may already lie dormant in simple economies.The impact of modernization on lowland Amerindians is a topic of great concern to anthropologists, researchers, and policymakers in developing nations, and this book is a significant contribution to the debate about the likely future of indigenous people.

Table of Contents

Introduction xi
Acknowledgments xv
Part I The Question, the Research Design, and the People 1(66)
The Question and Its Significance
3(12)
Clearing the Underbrush
9(6)
Comparing Approaches
15(18)
The Approach of Development Economists
16(4)
The Approach of Political Economists
20(3)
The Anthropological Approach
23(1)
The Model of Gross and Colleagues
24(5)
A Ricardian Model of Trade
29(3)
Conclusion
32(1)
Research Design
33(16)
Definitions, Causality, and Functional Form
33(3)
Rationale for the Choice of Cultures
36(1)
Methods Used to Collect Information
37(1)
Sumu-Mayagna (Nicaragua) and Tawahka (Honduras)
38(4)
Mojeno and Yuracare (Bolivia)
42(1)
Tsimane (Bolivia)
43(1)
Chiquitano (Bolivia)
43(1)
Quality of Information
44(1)
Sampling
45(1)
Conclusion
46(3)
Ethnographic Sketches
49(18)
Tawahka
52(5)
Tsimane
57(1)
Mojeno and Yuracare
58(2)
Chiquitano
60(2)
Similarities and Differences
62(3)
Conclusion
65(2)
Part II The Findings 67(132)
Forest Clearance: Income, Technology, and Private Time Preference
69(18)
Rationale for the Choice of Indigenous People and of Old-Growth Forest to Study Deforestation
70(1)
The Model
71(3)
Hypotheses
74(1)
Previous Studies
74(2)
Variables
76(4)
Results
80(1)
Hypotheses 1-3: Forest Clearance and Income
80(3)
Hypothesis 4: Forest Clearance and Crop Yields
83(1)
Hypothesis 5: Forest Clearnace and Private Time Preference
84(1)
Sensitivity Analysis and Controlling for Reverse Causality
85(1)
Conclusion
85(2)
Game Consumption, Income, and Prices: Empirical Estimates and Implications for Conservation
87(12)
The Role of Income and Prices in Game Consumption: Implications for Conservation
89(2)
Goals, Variables, and Econometric Models
91(1)
Results
92(3)
Comparing Availability of Game in Rich and Poor Communities
95(1)
Conclusion
96(3)
Chayanov and Netting: When Does Demography Matter?
99(16)
When Does Demography Matter?
101(1)
Goals and Econometric Approach
102(3)
Results
105(1)
Does Demography Matter After Controlling for Distance from Village to Town?
105(3)
Comparison of Autarkic and Non-Autarkic Households: Pooled Sample
108(2)
Comparison of Autarkic and Non-Autarkic Households: Results by Ethnic Group
110(2)
Conclusion
112(3)
Chayanov and Sahlins on Work and Leisure
115(12)
Cross-Cultural Evidence and Theory
117(1)
Goals
118(1)
Econometric Approach
119(2)
Potential Endogeneity and Fixed Effects
121(1)
Results
122(3)
Conclusion
125(2)
Human Health: Does It Worsen with Markets?
127(24)
The Three Positions in the Debate
128(2)
Reasons for Divergent Views
130(3)
Hypotheses
133(2)
Definition and Measurement of Variables
135(5)
Econometric Models, Endogeneity, and Comparing Different Metrics
140(2)
The Limits of Bivariate Analysis: A Detour and Example
142(2)
Results of Multivariate Analysis
144(4)
Conclusion
148(1)
The Debate
149(2)
Mishaps, Savings, and Reciprocity
151(22)
Definition, Measurement, and Estimation
153(2)
The Approach of Evolutionary Ecologists
155(1)
A New Approach to Reciprocity
156(2)
A Reduced-Form, Unrestricted Model of Savings
158(1)
Ethnographic Context of Misfortunes and Coping Mechanisms
159(4)
Savings in Domesticated Animals and Misfortunes
163(1)
Definition and Measurement of Variables
164(2)
Results
166(1)
Markets and Reciprocity
166(3)
Saving Out of Transitory or Permanent Income
169(1)
Conclusion
169(4)
Trade and Cognition: On the Growth and Loss of Knowledge
173(12)
Nicholas Brokaw
David Wilkie
Daniel Colon
Adam Palermo
Suzanne Lye
Stanley Wei
A Ricardian Trade Model and the Loss of Knowledge
174(1)
Econometric Model
175(1)
Methods
176(1)
Test of Knowledge
176(2)
Household Socioeconomic and Demographic Surveys
178(1)
The Variables: Defintion and Measurement
178(5)
Specialization
183(1)
Conclusion
184(1)
Time Preference, Markets, and the Evolution of Social Inequality
185(14)
Delay of Gratification Among the Tsimane
186(2)
The Determinants of Time Preferences: Tsimane and Western Views
188(2)
Methods and Variables
190(1)
The Measurement of Time Preference and The Rationale for Using Food
191(1)
Information and Econometric Model
192(1)
Results
193(1)
A Hypothesis About Time Preference and Occupational Choice
194(2)
Conclusion
196(3)
Part III What We Have Learned 199(10)
Conclusions
203(6)
Contribution to Anthropological Theory
203(2)
Contribution to Anthropological Methods
205(1)
Knowledge and Public Policy
206(3)
Appendix 209(4)
References 213(28)
Index 241

Rewards Program

Write a Review