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Influences : Art, Optics, and Astrology in the Italian Renaissance

by
ISBN13:

9780226922843

ISBN10:
0226922847
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
2/6/2013
Publisher(s):
Univ of Chicago Pr
List Price: $35.00

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What version or edition is this?
This is the edition with a publication date of 2/6/2013.
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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Summary

Today few would think of astronomy and astrology as fields related to theology. Fewer still would know that physically absorbing planetary rays was once considered to have medical and psychological effects. But this was the understanding of light radiation held by certain natural philosophers of early modern Europe, and that, argues Mary Quinlan-McGrath, was why educated people of the Renaissance commissioned artworks centered on astrological themes and practices. Influencesis the first book to reveal how important Renaissance artworks were designed to be not only beautiful but also-perhaps even primarily-functional. From the fresco cycles at Caprarola, to the Vatican's Sala dei Pontefici, to the Villa Farnesina, these great works were commissioned to selectively capture and then transmit celestial radiation, influencing the bodies and minds of their audiences. Quinlan-McGrath examines the sophisticated logic behind these theories and practices and, along the way, sheds light on early creation theory; the relationship between astrology and natural theology; and the protochemistry, physics, and mathematics of rays. An original and intellectually stimulating study, Influencesadds a new dimension to the understanding of aesthetics among Renaissance patrons and a new meaning to the seductive powers of art.


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