9780262516754

The Inner History of Devices

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780262516754

  • ISBN10:

    0262516756

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 9/30/2011
  • Publisher: Mit Pr

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $59!
    Your order must be $59 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $15.32 Save up to $5.36
  • Rent Book $9.96
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Used, Rental and eBook copies of this book are not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

For more than two decades, in such landmark studies as The Second Self and Life on the Screen, Sherry Turkle has challenged our collective imagination with her insights about how technology enters our private worlds. In The Inner History of Devices, she describes her process, an approach that reveals how what we make is woven into our ways of seeing ourselves. She brings together three traditions of listening--that of the memoirist, the clinician, and the ethnographer. Each informs the others to compose an inner history of devices. We read about objects ranging from cell phones and video poker to prosthetic eyes, from Web sites and television to dialysis machines. In an introductory essay, Turkle makes the case for an "intimate ethnography" that challenges conventional wisdom. One personal computer owner tells Turkle: "This computer means everything to me. It's where I put my hope." Turkle explains that she began that conversation thinking she would learn how people put computers to work. By its end, her question has changed: "What was there about personal computers that offered such deep connection? What did a computer have that offered hope?" The Inner History of Devices teaches us to listen for the answer. In the memoirs, ethnographies, and clinical cases collected in this volume, we read about an American student who comes to terms with her conflicting identities as she contemplates a cell phone she used in Japan ("Tokyo sat trapped inside it"); a troubled patient who uses email both to criticize her therapist and to be reassured by her; a compulsive gambler who does not want to win steadily at video poker because a pattern of losing and winning keeps her more connected to the body of the machine. In these writings, we hear untold stories. We learn that received wisdom never goes far enough.

Author Biography

Sherry Turkle is Abby Rockefeller Mauz Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology at MIT and Director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self. She is the editor of Evocative Objects (2007) and Falling for Science (2008), both published by the MIT Press, and the author of Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other and other books.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. viii
Reading The Inner History Of Devices
Inner Historyp. 2
Through Memoir
The Prosthetic Eyep. 32
Cell Phonesp. 41
The Patterning Tablep. 49
Televisionp. 55
Through Clinical Practice
The World Wide Webp. 64
Computer Gamesp. 77
Cyberplacesp. 86
Through Fieldwork
The Internal Cardiac Defibrillatorp. 98
The Visible Humanp. 112
Slashdot.orgp. 125
The Dialysis Machinep. 138
Video Pokerp. 153
Notesp. 172
Indexp. 198
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

Rewards Program

Write a Review