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Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities,9780024137517
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Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780024137517

ISBN10:
0024137510
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/1993
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
List Price: $85.00
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  • Instruction of Students With Severe Disabilities
    Instruction of Students With Severe Disabilities
  • Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities
    Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities
  • Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities
    Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities




Summary

This is a comprehensive and current description of research-based methods on teaching students with severe disabilities including students with autism and functional skill needs. A great reference book. Reflects 1997 IDEA in all chapters, particularly those that deal with the topics of transition and families. Adds a chapter on peer/social relationships. Creates and maintains reader interest with effective photographs, vignettes, specific charts, and unique figures/tables. Reinforces its comprehensive research base with current studies. For educators and school administrators.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Full Inclusion and School Restructuring
1(30)
Wayne Sailor
Kathleen Gee
Patricia Karasoff
Integration and Educational Reform
1(1)
From Integration to Inclusion
2(1)
The Key Elements of Full Inclusion
2(5)
Full General Education Class Membership
4(1)
Full Ownership from Both Special and General Education
5(1)
Individual Outcomes-Based Decision Making
5(1)
Student-Based Services
5(1)
Site-Team Coordination of Services
5(2)
Education Policy
7(9)
The First Wave of Reform: School Excellence
7(1)
Students at Risk
8(1)
The Second Wave of Reform: School Restructuring
9(1)
Critical Variables in School Restructuring
9(6)
General Education and Special Education in School Restructuring Efforts
15(1)
The Comprehensive Local School
16(1)
Designing the Individual's Curriculum within the General Curriculum
17(14)
Determining Initial Priorities
17(6)
Reevaluating and Finalizing Instructional Objectives and Points of Instruction
23(1)
Designing, Delivering, and Measuring Instruction
23(1)
Setting Up Peer Support Networks and Facilitating Friendships
23(8)
Chapter 2 Family and Professional Interaction
31(30)
Ann P. Turnbull
Mary E. Morningstar
The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act: Parental Rights and Responsibilities
32(5)
Zero Reject
32(1)
Nondiscriminatory Evaluation
33(1)
Individualized Education Programs
34(1)
The Least Restrictive Environment
34(1)
Due Process
35(1)
Parent Participation
36(1)
Parents as Educational Decision Makers
37(6)
Parent Involvement in Evaluation
37(2)
Parent Involvement in IEP Development
39(4)
A Family Systems Perspective
43(18)
Family Characteristics
46(2)
Family Interaction
48(1)
Family Functions
49(3)
The Family Life Cycle
52(9)
Chapter 3 Meaningful Assessment
61(38)
Fredda Brown
Martha E. Snell
General Issues
62(1)
Definitions of Disability
62(1)
Purposes of Assessment
63(3)
Screening
63(2)
Diagnosis and Placement
65(1)
Curriculum Development
65(1)
Evaluation
65(1)
Factors Related to Meaningful Assessment
66(3)
Test Reliability
66(1)
Test Validity
66(1)
Data Gathering
66(2)
Scoring
68(1)
The Developmental Approach
69(3)
IQ Tests
70(1)
Developmental Scales
70(2)
Adaptive Behavior
72(2)
Criterion-Referenced Tests of Adaptive Behavior
72(2)
Criterion-Referenced Tests of Specific Domains
74(1)
Environmental Assessment Strategies
74(25)
Ecological Inventories
74(3)
Applications of the Ecological Model
77(13)
Functional Assessment of Problem Behaviors
90(1)
Program Quality and Quality of Life
91(2)
Prioritizing Skills from Assessment Information
93(6)
Chapter 4 Instructional Planning and Implementation
99(53)
Martha E. Snell
Fredda Brown
Developing the IEP and Planning the Curriculum
99(9)
Collaborating with Others
99(6)
Determining Where Students Will Be During School Hours
105(2)
Writing the IEP
107(1)
Planning Instruction, Staffing, and Scheduling
108(37)
Factors Influencing Teaching Methods
108(6)
Teaching Methods
114(24)
Scheduling Instruction
138(1)
Planning the Teaching Arrangement
139(6)
Implementing Instruction
145(7)
Chapter 5 Measurement, Analysis, and Evaluation
152(32)
Fredda Brown
Martha E. Snell
Measurement
152(18)
Making Measurement Meaningful
153(2)
Making Behavior Observable and Measurable
155(15)
Analysis
170(7)
Types of Data
171(1)
Ungraphed Data
171(2)
Visual Aids
173(4)
Evaluation
177(7)
Analyzing the Problem
177(3)
Special Considerations in Regular Education Settings
180(4)
Chapter 6 Effective Behavior Support Plans
184(31)
Robert H. Horner
Robert E. O'Neill
K. Brigid Flannery
Outcomes of Effective Behavioral Support
185(1)
Reduction of Problem Behaviors
185(1)
Health and Safety
185(1)
Acquisition of New Skills
185(1)
Changes in Activity Patterns
185(1)
Choice and Preference
186(1)
Elements of Functional Assessment
186(1)
Operational Description
186(1)
Predictor Variables
186(1)
Maintaining Consequences
187(1)
Verification
187(1)
Procedure for Collecting Assessment Information
187(3)
Interviews
187(1)
Rating Scales
187(1)
Direct Observations in Typical Settings
188(1)
Functional Analyses
188(2)
Issues in Functional Assessment
190(1)
The Functions of Problem Behaviors
190(1)
Multiply-Controlled Repertoires
190(1)
Professional Standards
191(1)
Behavior Support Plans
191(1)
Hypotheses
191(1)
Multiple Components
191(1)
Local Contexts
191(1)
The Competing Behaviors Model
192(10)
Condition DS: Different Antecedents, Same Reinforcer
192(1)
Condition SS: Same Antecedent, Same Reinforcer
193(1)
Condition DD: Different Antecedents, Different Reinforcers
193(1)
Condition SD: Same Antecedent, Different Reinforcers
194(1)
Using the Competitive Behaviors Model
194(3)
Evaluating Student Knowledge of the Alternative Behaviors
197(5)
Building Effective Behavior Support Plans
202(13)
Elements of a Support Plan
202(5)
An Assessment Summary for Diane
207(1)
A Behavior Support Plan for Diane
208(7)
Chapter 7 Special Health Care Procedures
215(33)
Marilyn Mulligan Ault
J. Carolyn Graff
Jane P. Rues
Quality Health Care and Teaching
216(1)
General Classroom Health Care Procedures
217(4)
Infection Control
217(1)
First Aid
218(1)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
219(2)
Common Health Care Procedures
221(17)
Seizure Monitoring
221(2)
Medication Administration
223(6)
Nutrition Monitoring and Supplementation
229(5)
Teeth and Gum Care
234(1)
Skin Care
235(2)
Bowel Care
237(1)
Low-Incidence Health Care Procedures
238(6)
Nonoral Feeding Procedures
238(1)
Atypical Elimination Procedures--Bowel or Intestinal Ostomy Care
239(1)
Atypical Elimination Procedures--Clean Intermittent Catherization
240(1)
Respiratory Management--Tracheostomy Care
240(2)
Respiratory Management--Suctioning
242(1)
Respiratory Management--Oxygen Supplementation
242(1)
Respiratory Management--Assisted Ventilation
243(1)
Glucose Monitoring
243(1)
Shunt Care
243(1)
Special Health Care Procedures in Integrated Settings
244(1)
Children in Pain
244(1)
Children Who Are Dying
245(3)
Chapter 8 Physical Management and Handling Procedures
248(16)
Philippa H. Campbell
Goals of Proper Physical Management
248(1)
Physical Management Routines
249(2)
Lifting and Transfer
251(1)
Lifting
251(1)
Transfer
252(1)
Carrying
252(1)
Positioning
253(3)
Selecting Adaptive Equipment
253(1)
Uses of Adaptive Equipment
254(1)
Improving Functional Performance
254(2)
Eating and Drinking
256(3)
Positioning for Proper Feeding
256(1)
Approaches to Eating and Drinking
257(1)
Methods to Normalize Tone and Promote Coordinated Eating and Drinking Patterns
257(1)
Nutrition
258(1)
Independent Eating and Drinking
258(1)
Toileting
259(1)
Dressing
260(4)
Positioning for Dressing and Undressing
260(1)
Facilitation Procedures
261(1)
Managing Fastenings
261(3)
Chapter 9 Integrated Programming and Movement Disabilities
264(26)
Philippa H. Campbell
Sarah Forsyth
Postural and Movement Competence
265(1)
Postural Tone
266(2)
Deviations in Postural Tone
266(1)
Degrees of Postural Tone
266(1)
Environmental Influences
266(2)
Development of Abnormal Posture and Movement
268(2)
Rate of Movement
270(3)
Form and Function of Posture and Movement
273(1)
Influences of Posture and Movement Disorders on Function
273(1)
Functional Outcomes Assessment Grids
273(6)
Linking the Grid to Programming
275(1)
Remedial, Compensatory, and Prevention-Intervention Approaches
275(4)
Therapeutic Procedures
279(5)
Intervention Methods to Attain Postural Alignment
280(4)
Intervention Methods to Control Environmental Influences on Posture and Movement
284(1)
Determining Program Effectiveness
284(1)
Integrating Therapeutic and Instructional Methods into Functional Curriculum
284(6)
Integrated Instructional Methods
286(1)
Locations for Intervention
286(1)
Data Collection Approaches
286(4)
Chapter 10 Nonsymbolic Communication
290(29)
Ellin Siegel-Causey
Amy Wetherby
Nonsymbolic Skills
291(7)
The Impact of Handicapping Conditions
291(1)
The Dual Focus of Intervention
291(1)
Early Communication Development
292(1)
Critical Aspects of Communication
292(4)
Recognizing Nonsymbolic Communication
296(1)
The Capacity for Symbols
296(2)
Assessment
298(8)
Learner Behaviors
298(4)
The Communicative Environment
302(3)
Communicative Intent
305(1)
Intervention Methods
306(13)
A Dual Assessment Focus
307(1)
Functional, Systematic Methods in Natural Routines
307(1)
Potential Content
307(1)
Intervention Guidelines
308(11)
Chapter 11 Augmentative and Alternative Communication
319(28)
Joan M. Miller
Types of Augmentative and Alternative Communication
319(10)
Unaided Systems
320(1)
Aided Systems
321(8)
Status of AAC Intervention
329(18)
Candidacy for AAC
329(1)
Selection of a Primary AAC Mode
330(1)
Instructional Issues
331(6)
Instructional Technology
337(10)
Chapter 12 Functional Language
347(33)
Ann P. Kaiser
Overview
348(1)
The Goals of Language Intervention
348(9)
Selecting Short-Term Targets
348(1)
Making Training Functional
349(1)
Core Milieu Teaching Strategies
349(1)
Research on Milieu Teaching
350(2)
An Example of Milieu Teaching
352(1)
Procedures
353(3)
When to Use Each of the Four Procedures
356(1)
Environmental Arrangement Strategies
357(2)
Interesting Materials
357(1)
Out of Reach
357(1)
Inadequate Portions
357(1)
Choice Making
358(1)
Assistance
358(1)
Silly Situations
358(1)
Responsive Conversational Style
359(1)
Implementing Milieu Teaching
360(3)
Data Collection and Evaluation
360(1)
How to Use Milieu Language Teaching
361(2)
Assessment
363(6)
Performing an Ecological Inventory
363(3)
Assessing Student Skills
366(1)
Combining Ecological Information and Student Assessments
367(2)
Generalized Skills Teaching
369(3)
What Is Taught
369(1)
Who Teaches
370(1)
How Students Are Reinforced
370(1)
Where Teaching Occurs
370(1)
How the Content Is Organized
370(1)
What Criteria for Learning Are Applied
371(1)
How Responsive the Environments Are to New Learning
371(1)
Designing an Optimal Training Approach
371(1)
An Application of Milieu Teaching
372(8)
General Findings
374(1)
The Functional Communication Program
375(2)
Additional Tasks
377(3)
Chapter 13 Self-Care Skills
380(62)
Martha E. Snell
Leslie J. Farlow
The Curriculum
381(1)
Toileting Skills
381(18)
Assessment of Toileting Skills
383(4)
Research on Teaching Independent Toilet Use
387(12)
An Example: John
399(1)
Eating Skills
399(19)
Assessment of Eating Skills
400(4)
Research on Teaching Eating Skills
404(14)
An Example: John
418(1)
Dressing and Grooming Skills
418(11)
Assessment of Dressing and Grooming Skills
419(3)
Research on Teaching Dressing and Grooming Skills
422(6)
An Example: John
428(1)
Applying Research to Practice
429(13)
Selecting Skills for Instruction
429(3)
Selecting Instructional Methods
432(2)
Selecting Times and Environments for Instruction
434(8)
Chapter 14 Functional Academics
442(38)
Diane M. Browder
Martha E. Snell
Academic Approaches
443(1)
Functional Academic Approaches
443(2)
The Generalized Approach
444(1)
The Specific, Embedded Approach
444(1)
The Context for Academic Instruction
445(1)
Academic Instruction
445(15)
Generalized Language Arts
445(6)
Specific, Embedded Language Arts Skills
451(3)
Generalized Functional Math
454(5)
Specific, Embedded Math Skills
459(1)
Assessment for Skill Selection
460(3)
Selection of an Academic Approach
460(2)
Selection of Skills
462(1)
Samples of IEP Objectives for Functional Academics
462(1)
Methods of Academic Instruction
463(17)
Planning for Generalization
463(8)
Methods to Teach Sight Words, Numbers, and Symbols
471(4)
The Activity and Setting for Instruction
475(5)
Chapter 15 Daily Living and Community Skills
480(46)
Diane M. Browder
Martha E. Snell
Community Access
480(1)
Planning
481(19)
Involving Caregivers and Learners in Planning
481(1)
Rationale for Instruction
482(1)
When and Where to Teach
483(5)
What and How to Teach
488(2)
Daily Living Skills
500(10)
Food Preparation Skills
500(4)
Personal Maintenance
504(1)
Housekeeping
505(3)
Personal Management
508(2)
Community-Based Instruction
510(16)
Issues
510(2)
Community Resources
512(4)
Community Mobility
516(10)
Chapter 16 Integrated Community Recreation
526(30)
Stuart J. Schleien
Frederick P. Green
Linda A. Heyne
The Rationale for Integrated Recreation Opportunities
528(1)
An Overview of Community Recreation Services
529(1)
Approaches to Integrated Recreation Services
529(7)
The Integration of Generic Recreation Programs Approach
530(2)
The Reverse Mainstreaming Approach
532(1)
Creating a New Program: The Zero Exclusion Approach
533(3)
Best Professional Practices in Community Recreation Integration
536(10)
Individual Needs Assessments
536(1)
Individual Preference Assessments
536(1)
Activity Selection Guidelines
537(3)
Collateral Skill Development
540(1)
Environmental Analysis
540(2)
Adaptations
542(2)
Ability Awareness Orientations and Friendship Training
544(1)
Cooperative Grouping Arrangements
545(1)
Behavioral Teaching Methods
545(1)
Program Evaluation
545(1)
Agencywide Systems Change: Movement from Segregation to Zero Exclusion
545(1)
Outcomes to Community Recreation Integration: Promoting Friendships
546(4)
Assessing Friendships
547(2)
Strategies for Promoting Friendships: Structuring Environments and Teaching Skills
549(1)
Guidelines and Recommendations for Planning Community Recreation Services
550(6)
Consumers
551(1)
Families and Other Care Providers
551(1)
Public and Private Recreation Service Agencies
551(1)
Federal, State, and Local Partnerships
551(5)
Chapter 17 Vocational Preparation and Transition
556(32)
M. Sherril Moon
Katherine Inge
Outcome-Oriented Vocational Transition
557(5)
Understanding What Is Available in Your Community
557(2)
Collaborating with Businesses, Other Agencies, Families and Advocates
559(1)
Supporting Families in the Transition Process
559(2)
Individualized Transition Plans
561(1)
School-Based Vocational Preparation
562(15)
A Longitudinal Vocational Curriculum
562(9)
Systematic, Behavioral Procedures for Teaching Vocational Skills
571(6)
Job Placement at Graduation
577(11)
Job Development
579(3)
Job Training and Maintenance
582(6)
Chapter 18 The Promise of Adulthood
588(21)
Philip M. Ferguson
Dianne L. Ferguson
Understanding Adulthood
589(4)
The Changing Status of Adulthood
589(1)
The Dimensions of Adulthood
590(3)
Denying Adulthood
593(5)
Unending Childhood
594(1)
Unfinished Transition
595(1)
Unhelpful Services
596(1)
The Dilemma of Adulthood
597(1)
Achieving Adulthood
598(11)
The Concept of Support
598(3)
The Dimensions of Adulthood Revisited
601(8)
Name Index 609(14)
Subject Index 623


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