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Instruction of Students With Severe Disabilities,9780130142474
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Instruction of Students With Severe Disabilities

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780130142474

ISBN10:
0130142476
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2000
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $90.00
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  • Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities
    Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities
  • Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities
    Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities
  • Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities
    Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities




Summary

For courses in Severe/Multiple Disabilities Methods. This highly successful text addresses the full range of curriculum topics involved in educating individuals with severe disabilities. Clear descriptions and explanations of best practices, time-proven techniques, and a strong theory/research base combine to create one of the most comprehensive texts of its kind. Its focus on meaningful inclusion of students with disabilities and their non-disabled peers make this book an ideal main text for courses in severe disabilities.

Table of Contents

Inclusion and School Restructuring
1(30)
Wayne Sailor
Kathleen Gee
Patricia Karasoff
The Community Schools Movement
3(7)
School-Linked Service Integration
7(2)
School-Based Community Schools
9(1)
Inclusion
10(12)
School Unification
22(9)
Fostering Family-Professional Partnerships
31(36)
Ann P. Turnbull
H. R. Turnbull
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act: Parental Rights and Responsibilities
33(12)
IDEA's Six Principles
33(10)
Supporting Families to Be Educational Advocates
43(2)
A Family Systems Perspective
45(22)
Family Characteristics
46(3)
Family Interaction
49(4)
Family Functions
53(4)
Family Life Cycle
57(10)
Meaningful Assessment
67(48)
Fredda Brown
Martha E. Snell
The Importance of Assessment
70(1)
Definitions of Disability
70(1)
Purposes of Assessment
71(5)
Screening
71(3)
Diagnosis and Placement
74(1)
Curriculum and Program Development
75(1)
Evalution
75(1)
Factors Related to Meaningful Assessment
76(3)
Test Reliability
76(1)
Test Validity
76(1)
Data Gathering
77(1)
Scoring
78(1)
The Developmental Approach
79(5)
IQ Tests
80(2)
Developmental Scales
82(2)
Adaptive Behavior
84(2)
Criterion-Referenced Tests and Test of Adaptive Behavior
84(1)
Criterion-Referenced Test of Specific Domains
84(2)
Environmental Assessment Strategies
86(2)
Who Assesses
86(1)
When and Where to Assess
87(1)
Multidimensional Framework for Conceptualizing Assessment
88(2)
Ecological Inventories
90(10)
Curriculum Domains
91(1)
Current and Future Natural Environments
91(1)
Subenvironments
91(1)
Relevant Activities
91(1)
Skills Required
92(4)
Examples of Ecological Inventories
96(1)
Applications of the Ecological Model
96(4)
Functional Assessment of Problem Behaviors
100(2)
Assessment of Student Preferences and Choices
102(3)
Assessment Procedures
102(2)
Considerations for Assessing Preferences
104(1)
Program Quality and Quality of Life
105(2)
Program Quality Indicators (PQI)
105(1)
Person-Centered Approaches to Assessment
106(1)
Prioritizing Skills from Assessment Information
107(8)
Development and Implementation of Educational Programs
115(58)
Martha E. Snell
Fredda Brown
Developing Educational Programs
115(9)
Desirable Student Outcomes
115(1)
Supportive School Practices
116(5)
Guiding Team Principles
121(3)
Designing Supports that Foster Relationships and Promote Membership
124(2)
How Can Membership Be Promoted?
124(1)
How Can Relationships Be Fostered?
124(2)
Designing and Putting Skill Programs in to Place
126(47)
Stages of Learning
126(3)
Writing IEPs
129(1)
The Logistics and Context of Teaching Programs
130(7)
Adapting General Education Class Work and Activities
137(9)
Intial Steps in Choosing Teaching Procedures
146(2)
Assessing Current Performance and Revising Instructional Objectives
148(3)
Selecting Antecedent Teaching Methods
151(9)
Selecting Consequence Teaching Methods
160(5)
Written Teaching Plans
165(8)
Measurement, Analysis, and Evaluation
173(34)
Fredda Brown
Martha E. Snell
Measurement
174(21)
Making Measurement Meaningful
175(2)
Making Behavior Observable and Measurable
177(1)
Quantitative Measures
178(1)
Measurement Strategies
179(10)
Data Sheets
189(1)
Measures of Accuracy
190(1)
Graphs
191(4)
Analysis
195(6)
Types of Data
195(1)
Ungraphed Data
195(1)
Obtaining a Baseline
196(1)
AB, or Baseline-Intervention, Design
197(1)
Graphing Conventions
197(1)
Visual Analysis
198(3)
Evalution
201(6)
Analyzing the Problem
201(1)
Special Considerations in General Educating Settings
202(5)
Positive Behavior Support
207(38)
Robert H. Horner
Richard W. Albin
Jeffrey R. Sprague
Anne W. Todd
Relevance of Positive Behavior Support
207(2)
Functional Assessment
209(19)
Outcomes of Functional Assessment
212(1)
Why Conduct a Functional Assessment?
212(1)
Functional Assessment as a Three-Step Process
213(2)
Define the Challenge
215(1)
Build a Hypothesis
215(2)
Using Functional Assessment Interviews
217(5)
Recent Developments in Functional Assessment
222(1)
Validate the Hypothesis
222(5)
Functional Analysis
227(1)
The Design of Comprehensive Behavior Support
228(17)
Behavior Support Should Be Technically Sound and Contextually Appropriate
228(1)
Behavior Support Should Be Comprehensive
229(2)
Competing Behaviors Model
231(2)
Constructing a Written Behavior Support Plan
233(12)
Special Health Care Procedures
245(46)
Marilyn M. Ault
Jane P. Rues
J. Carolyn Graff
Jennifer F. Holvoet
Where to go for Further Information or Training on the Internet
246(2)
Information about Disabilities
247(1)
Medical Treatments
247(1)
Opportunities to Confer with Other
248(1)
Quality Health Care and Teaching
248(2)
Integrating Health Care Needs
249(1)
Preventing Additional Health Care Problems
249(1)
What Does a school Nurse Know?
250(1)
General Health Care Procedures
250(9)
Infection Control
250(2)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
252(2)
First Aid
254(5)
Specialized Health Care Procedures
259(14)
Monitoring Procedures
259(5)
Growth Monitoring, Nutrition Supplementation, and Feeding Management
264(4)
Routing Implementation Procedures
268(2)
Skin Care
270(1)
Bowel Care
271(2)
Low-Incidence Health Care Procedures
273(10)
Nonoral Feeding Procedures
273(3)
Atypical Elimination Procedures: Bowel or Intestinal Ostomy Care
276(1)
Atypical Elimination Procedures: Clean Intermittent Catheterization
277(1)
Respiratory Management: Tracheostomy Care
278(2)
Respiratory Management: Suctioning
280(1)
Respiratory Management: Oxygen Supplementation
280(1)
Respiratory Management: Mechanical Ventilation
281(1)
Glucose Monitoring
282(1)
Shunt Care
283(1)
Issues in Providing Special Health Care
283(8)
Occurence in Integrated Settings
283(1)
Children in Pain
284(1)
Children Who Are Dying
284(1)
Withholding Treatment
285(6)
Promoting Participation in Natural Environments by Accommodating Motor Disabilities
291(40)
Philippa H. Campbell
Key Issues in Motor Disability
292(9)
Movement Competence, Adaptation, and Participation
293(1)
Motor From Versus Function
294(1)
Barriers to Motor Competence
294(6)
Coordination of Service and Supports
300(1)
Goals of Proper Physical Management
301(1)
Physical Management Routines
302(3)
Methods of Changing Position
305(3)
Lifting
305(2)
Transfers
307(1)
Carrying
307(1)
Positioning
308(5)
Selecting Adaptive Equipment
308(1)
Purposes of Adaptive Equipment
309(1)
Improving Functional Performance
310(2)
Promoting Community Participation
312(1)
Eating and Drinking
313(6)
Positioning for Proper Feeding
314(1)
Approaches to Eating and Drinking
314(1)
Neuromotor Methods to Promote Coordinated Eating and Drinking Patterns
315(2)
Nutrition
317(1)
Independent Eating and Drinking
318(1)
Toileting
319(1)
Dressing
320(2)
Positioning for Dressing and Undressing
320(1)
Selecting Clothing
321(1)
Facilitating Dressing and Undressing
321(1)
Managing Fastenings
322(1)
Getting Help from Therapists and Other Specialists: Working as a Team
322(9)
Teaching Basic Self-Care Skills
331(50)
Leslie J. Farlow
Martha E. Snell
A Rationale for Attainting Proficiency in Self-Care Routines
333(1)
Problems with Current Research
334(1)
General Principles for Developing Self-Care Instruction
334(18)
Collaborate with Team Members
335(1)
Use Socially Valid Procedures that Are Appropriate for Age and Culture
335(1)
Involve Peers
336(2)
Use Partial Participation Carefully
338(1)
Conduct Meaningful Assessment and Use the Results
338(3)
Select Appropriate Setting and Schedules for Instruction
341(1)
Select Uncomplicated and Effective Instructional Methods
342(8)
Consideer Related Skills for Instruction
350(2)
Special Considerations for Toileting
352(11)
Assessment and Instruction
352(1)
Prerequisites for Toilet Training
353(1)
Assessment of Toileting Performance
353(2)
Approaches for Teaching Daytime Toileting
355(8)
Approaches for Teaching Nighttime Toileting
363(1)
Special Considerations for Eating and Mealtime
363(8)
Assessment and Instruction
363(4)
Instructional Strategies for Eating and Mealtime
367(4)
Special Considerations for Dressing and Grooming
371(10)
Assessment and Instruction
371(1)
Range of Skills
371(1)
Instructional Considerations
371(1)
Dressing and Grooming Materials
372(1)
Embedded Behaviors in Dressing and Grooming Routines
372(1)
Recent Studies in Dressing and Grooming Research
373(8)
Peer Relationships
381(28)
Debbie Staub
Charles A. Peck
Chrysan Gallucci
Ilene Schwartz
Peer Relationships and Developmental Outcomes
384(6)
The Outcome Framework
385(2)
Three Case Illustrations
387(2)
Relationships and Learning
389(1)
Strategies for Intervention
390(10)
Designing ``Usable'' Interventions
390(1)
Recognizing and Supporting a Range of Relationships
391(5)
Recognizing and Supporting Membership
396(4)
Assessment and Evaluation of Peer Relationships
400(3)
Narrative Observational Records
401(1)
Interviews
401(1)
Analyzing and Evaluating Narrative Data
402(1)
Nondisabled Students and Severely Disabled Peers: All True Benefits Are Mutual
403(6)
Companionship
404(1)
Growth in Social Cognition and Self-Concept
404(1)
Development of Personal Principles
404(5)
Nonsymbolic Communication
409(44)
Ellin Siegel
Amy Wetherby
Nonsymbolic Skills
411(1)
The Impact of the Disability
411(1)
The Tri-Focus of Intervention
411(1)
Early Communication Development
412(10)
Critical Aspects of Communication
412(1)
A Three-Stage Communication Progression
413(4)
Recognizing Nonsymbolic Communication
417(4)
The Capacity for Symbols
421(1)
Assessment
422(13)
Assessment: Understanding the Nonsymbolic Communicator Using a Learner Profile
423(6)
The Communicative Environment
429(1)
Assessment: Understanding the Social Environment Using a Partner Profile
429(4)
Assessment: Understanding the Physical Environment Using an Environmental Profile
433(1)
Strategies for Assessing Nonsymbolic Communication
434(1)
Intervention Methods
435(18)
A Reciprocal Assessment Focus
436(1)
Functional Systematic Methods in Natural Routines
436(1)
Potential Communication Content
436(1)
Intervention Guidelines to Enhance Partner's Symbolic Expression
437(4)
Intervention to Enhance Partner's Understanding of Nonsymbolic Communication
441(1)
Intervention to Enhance Communication Contexts
442(1)
Enhance Communication Contexts and Attend to External Influences on State Behavior
442(11)
Teaching Functional Communication Skills
453(40)
Ann P. Kaiser
Overview of Milieu Teaching
456(3)
The Goals of Language Intervention
457(2)
Milieu Teaching Strategies
459(13)
Guidelines for Milieu Teachers
459(1)
Milieu Teaching Procedures
460(6)
Environmental Arrangement Strategies
466(3)
Responsive Conversational Style
469(2)
Research on Milieu Teaching
471(1)
Implementing Milieu Teaching
472(21)
Data Collection and Evaluation
472(1)
How to Use Milieu Language Teaching
473(3)
Assessment
476(5)
Generalized Skills Teaching
481(3)
Designing an Optimal Teaching Approach
484(9)
Teaching Functional Academics
493(50)
Diane M. Browder
Martha E. Snell
Overview of Functional Academics
497(5)
The Importance of Functional Academics
497(1)
Selecting Functional Academic Skills for Instruction
497(5)
Teaching Strategies for Functional Academics
502(23)
Where to Teach Functional Academics
502(3)
Format for Instruction: Group Instruction and Observational Learning
505(2)
Incidental Learning in the Context of Systematic Instruction
507(1)
Peer Tutors
507(1)
Prompting and Feedback Procedures
508(13)
Designing and Selecting Materials to Encourage Learning
521(1)
Planning for Generalization
522(2)
Skill Maintenance
524(1)
Functional Reading and Language Arts Instruction
525(6)
Generalized Functional Reading
526(3)
Specific, Embedded Reading
529(2)
Functional Math
531(12)
Generalized Functional Math
531(6)
Specific, Embedded Math Skills
537(6)
Home and Community
543(48)
Diane M. Browder
Linda M. Bambara
Planning Instruction to Enhance Skills for Home and the Community
544(2)
Self-Determination: A New Era for Home and Community Instruction
544(2)
Guidelines to Plan Instruction
546(1)
Guideline One: Use Person-Centered Planning Strategies
546(4)
Structured Action Planning
546(3)
Collaborative Meetings
549(1)
Guideline Two: Enhance Choice, Self-Prompting, and Self-Management
550(4)
Choice
550(1)
Self-prompting
551(1)
Self-management
552(2)
Guideline Three: Use Efficient Strategies, Peer Instruction, and Observational Learning
554(6)
Choosing the Instructional Setting
554(3)
General Case Instruction
557(1)
Efficient Teaching Strategies
558(2)
Guideline Four: Use Transition Planning to Focus Community-Based Instruction
560(1)
Resources for Planning Instructional Support
561(30)
Skills for the Home
561(1)
Food Preparation
561(6)
Housekeeping and Laundry
567(2)
Home Safety and First Aid
569(2)
Telephone Use
571(1)
Sex Education
572(1)
Skills for the Community
573(1)
Safety Skills
573(1)
Purchasing
574(1)
Dining Out and Buying Snacks
575(3)
Community Leisure
578(4)
Banking
582(1)
Community Mobility
582(9)
Vocational Preparation and Transition
591(38)
M. Sherril Moon
Katherine Inge
Defining Transition
592(1)
Characteristics of Effective Vocational Preparation and Transition Programs
593(6)
Understanding Which Services Are Available in Your Community
593(4)
Supporting Families
597(1)
Determining Student Preferences ad Interests
597(1)
Balancing Vocational Preparation with Inclusion and Other Programs
597(1)
Collaborating with a Team for Successful Transition
598(1)
Individual Transition Planning and the IEP
599(1)
School-Based Vocational Preparation
599(22)
Longitudinal Instruction of Work-Related Skills Across Grades and Settings
600(1)
Identifying a Career Path
601(2)
Employment Training Related to the Local Economy
603(1)
Job Training Across a Variety of Real Jobs in Real Employment Settings
604(2)
Establishing Community-Based Training Sites
606(4)
Selecting Systematic Behavioral Procedures to Teach Vocational Skills
610(4)
Selecting an Instructional Strategy
614(6)
Special Considerations for Students with Physical Disabilities: Assistive Technology
620(1)
Paid Employment
621(8)
Social Security Benefits and Work Incentives
624(1)
Employment Support After Graduation
625(4)
The Promise of Adulthood
629(28)
Philip M. Ferguson
Dianne L. Ferguson
Understanding Adulthood
630(8)
The Changing Status of Adulthood
631(1)
The Dimensions of Adulthood
632(6)
Denying Adulthood
638(6)
Unending Childhood
638(1)
Unfinished Transition
639(1)
Unhelpful Services
640(2)
The Dilemma of Adulthood
642(2)
Achieving Adulthood
644(4)
The Concept of Support
645(1)
What Is New About Supported Adulthood?
645(1)
Components of Supported Adulthood
645(3)
Dimensions of Adulthood Revisited
648(9)
Supported Autonomy
649(1)
Supported Membership
650(1)
Supported Change
651(1)
Multidimensional Adulthood
652(1)
Some Dangers Ahead
653(4)
Name Index 657(14)
Subject Index 671


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