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Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities,9780131143357
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Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities

by ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780131143357

ISBN10:
0131143352
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $132.00

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This is the 6th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2006.
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  • Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities
    Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities
  • Instruction of Students With Severe Disabilities
    Instruction of Students With Severe Disabilities
  • Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities
    Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities




Summary

This highly successful book addresses the full range of curriculum topics involved in educating individuals with severe disabilities.Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilitiesexamines the principles behind teaching students with severe and multiple disabilities. This edition includes more information on alternative assessment, a stronger focus on positive behavior interventions and supports, and additional strategies on peer relationships.

Table of Contents

Foundational Concepts and Practices for Educating Students with Severe Disabilities
1(27)
Michael F. Giangreco
Who Are Students with Severe Disabilities?
2(1)
Definitions
2(1)
Societal Perceptions and Expectations
3(1)
Opportunities for Interaction and Reciprocal Benefit
3(1)
The Best and Worst of Times
3(4)
The Best of Times: Reasons for Optimism
3(2)
The Worst of Times
5(2)
Access to Appropriate Education
7(16)
Access to the Least Restrictive Environment
7(1)
Access to Appropriate Curriculum
8(7)
Access to Effective Instruction
15(5)
Access to Individually Determined Supports
20(3)
Summary
23(1)
References
24(4)
Fostering Family--Professional Partnerships
28(39)
Ann P. Turnbull
Rud Turnbull
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act: Parental Rights and Responsibilities
30(9)
IDEA's Six Principles
30(8)
Supporting Families to Be Educational Advocates
38(1)
A Family Systems Perspective
39(17)
Family Characteristics
41(3)
Family Interaction
44(3)
Family Functions
47(4)
Family Life Cycle
51(5)
Summary
56(1)
Suggested Activity: A Tale of Two Families
56(2)
References
58(9)
Meaningful Assessment
67(44)
Fredda Brown
Martha E. Snell
Donna Lehr
The Importance of Assessment
67(2)
Definitions of Disability
69(1)
Purposes of Assessment
70(4)
Screening
71(1)
Diagnosis and Placement
72(1)
Curriculum and Program Development
72(1)
Evaluation
73(1)
Factors Related to Meaningful Assessment
74(3)
Test Reliability
74(1)
Test Validity
74(1)
Data Gathering
74(2)
Scoring
76(1)
Norm-Referenced Assessments
77(2)
IQ Tests
77(1)
Developmental Scales
78(1)
Criterion-Referenced Assessments
79(4)
Tests of Adaptive Behavior
79(2)
Assessment of Academic Performance
81(2)
Multidimensional Framework for Conceptualizing Functional Assessment
83(1)
Informal Environmental Assessment Strategies
84(19)
Who Assesses
85(1)
When and Where to Assess
85(1)
Ecological Inventories
86(1)
Curriculum Domains
87(1)
Current and Future Natural Environments
87(1)
Subenvironments
88(1)
Relevant Activities
88(1)
Skills Required
89(3)
Examples of Ecological Inventories
92(4)
Applications of Ecological Inventory
96(1)
Functional Assessment of Problem Behaviors
97(1)
Assessment of Student Preferences and Choices
98(1)
Assessment Procedures
99(1)
Considerations for Assessing Preferences
100(1)
Program Quality and Quality of Life
101(1)
Program Quality Indicators (PQI)
101(1)
Person-Centered Approaches to Assessment
102(1)
Prioritizing Skills from Assessment Information
103(2)
Summary
105(1)
Suggested Activities
105(1)
References
106(5)
Designing and Implementing Instructional Programs
111(59)
Martha E. Snell
Fredda Brown
Developing and Writing IEPs
112(12)
What Is a High-Quality IEP?
112(1)
Writing IEPs
113(2)
The IEP and Inclusion
115(1)
Influences on Goals and Objectives
116(8)
Translating IEPs into Action
124(29)
Articulating the Teaching Structure
124(10)
Selecting Teaching Methods
134(19)
Planning and Designing Instruction for the General Education Class
153(10)
Adapting General Education Class Work and Activities
153(10)
Teachers' Instructional Record Keeping
163(2)
Summary
165(1)
Suggested Activities
165(2)
References
167(3)
Measurement, Analysis, and Evaluation
170(36)
Fredda Brown
Martha E. Snell
Measurement
172(21)
Measurement of Important Behaviors
172(3)
Accurate and Reliable Measurement
175(1)
Quantitative Measures
175(2)
Measurement Strategies
177(10)
Data Sheets
187(1)
Measures of Accuracy
188(1)
Graphs
189(4)
Analysis
193(7)
Types of Data
194(1)
Ungraphed Data
194(1)
Obtaining a Baseline
194(1)
Baseline-Intervention Design
195(1)
Graphing Conventions
196(1)
Visual Analysis
197(3)
Evaluation
200(3)
Special Considerations in General Education Settings
202(1)
Summary
203(1)
Suggested Activities
203(1)
References
203(3)
Positive Behavior Support for Individuals with Severe Disabilities
206(45)
Robert H. Horner
Richard W. Albin
Anne W. Todd
Jeffrey Sprague
Cascading Model of PBS
208(20)
Problem Behavior
209(1)
Assessment for Behavior Support Planning
210(18)
Using Assessment Information to Guide Behavior Support Plan Content
228(18)
A Positive BSP Should Be Technically Sound
229(1)
A Positive BSP Should Be Contextually Appropriate
229(1)
A Positive BSP Should Be a Collaborative Endeavor
229(1)
A Positive BSP Should Be Comprehensive
230(1)
A Positive BSP Should Be Sustainable
231(1)
Competing Behavior Analysis
231(4)
Contents of a Written BSP
235(11)
Summary
246(1)
References
246(5)
Special Health Care Procedures
251(40)
Jane P. Rues
J. Carolyn Graff
Marilyn Mulligan Ault
Jennifer Holvoet
Quality Health Care and Teaching
252(2)
Integrating Health Care Needs
254(1)
Preventing Additional Health Care Problems
255(1)
What Does a School Nurse Know?
255(1)
Health and Safety Procedures
256(19)
Infection Control
256(1)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
257(1)
First Aid
258(4)
Routine Prevention Procedures
262(2)
Skin Care
264(1)
Bowel Care
265(2)
Specialized Health Care Procedures
267(8)
Low-Incidence Health Care Procedures
275(9)
Nonoral Feeding Procedures
275(2)
Atypical Elimination Procedures: Bowel or Intestinal Ostomy Care
277(1)
Atypical Elimination Procedures: Clean Intermittent Catheterization
278(1)
Respiratory Management: Tracheostomy Care
279(1)
Respiratory Management: Suctioning
280(1)
Respiratory Management: Oxygen Supplementation
280(1)
Respiratory Management: Mechanical Ventilation
281(1)
Glucose Monitoring
282(1)
Shunt Care
283(1)
Issues in Providing Special Health Care
284(3)
Participation in Integrated Settings
284(1)
Children in Pain
285(1)
Children Who Are Dying
285(1)
Withholding Treatment
286(1)
Summary
287(1)
Suggested Activities
288(1)
References
288(3)
Addressing Motor Disabilities
291(37)
Philippa H. Campbell
Key Concepts in Understanding Motor Disability
292(9)
Movement Abilities, Adaptation, and Participation
293(1)
Movement Form and Function
294(2)
The Importance of Weight Shifting to Movement Abilities
296(1)
Barriers to Skilled Movement
297(4)
Getting Help from Therapists and Other Specialists: Working as a Team
301(8)
A Framework for Team Decision Making
303(2)
Adaptation Interventions to Promote Participation
305(3)
Coordination of Services and Supports
308(1)
Proper Physical Management
309(17)
Physical Management Routines
310(6)
Proper Positioning and Adaptive Equipment
316(10)
Summary
326(1)
Suggested Activities
326(1)
References
326(2)
Teaching Self-Care Skills
328(47)
Leslie J. Farlow
Martha E. Snell
A Rationale for Attaining Proficiency in Self-Care Routines
329(1)
Problems with Current Research
330(1)
General Principles for Developing Self-Care Instruction
330(18)
Collaborate with Team Members
331(1)
Conduct Meaningful Assessment and Use the Results
332(1)
Use Socially Valid Procedures, Appropriate for Age and Culture
333(2)
Involve Peers
335(1)
Use Partial Participation Carefully
336(1)
Select Appropriate and Respectful Environments for Instruction
337(1)
Select Uncomplicated and Effective Instructional Methods
338(8)
Consider Related Skills for Instruction
346(2)
Special Considerations for Toileting
348(11)
Assessment and Instruction
348(1)
Prerequisites for Toilet Training
348(1)
Assessment of Toileting Performance
349(2)
Approaches for Teaching Toileting
351(8)
Special Considerations for Eating and Mealtime
359(7)
Assessment and Instruction
359(3)
Instructional Strategies for Eating and Mealtimes
362(4)
Special Considerations for Dressing and Grooming
366(1)
Assessment and Instruction
366(1)
Range of Skills
366(1)
Schedule and Location of Instruction
366(1)
Dressing and Grooming Materials
367(1)
Dressing and Grooming Routines
367(1)
Instructional Strategies for Teaching Dressing and Grooming Skills
367(2)
Summary
369(1)
Suggested Activities
370(1)
References
370(5)
Peer Relationships
375(30)
Ilene S. Schwartz
Debbie Staub
Charles A. Peck
Chrysan Gallucci
Peer Relationships and Developmental Outcomes
377(6)
The Outcome Framework
378(5)
Relationships and Learning
383(1)
Strategies for Intervention
383(11)
Designing ``Usable'' Interventions
384(1)
Recognizing and Supporting Membership
384(4)
Recognizing and Supporting a Range of Relationships
388(5)
Recognizing and Supporting Skill and Knowledge
393(1)
Assessment and Evaluation of Peer Relationships
394(5)
Narrative Observational Records
395(2)
Interviews
397(1)
Analyzing and Evaluating Narrative Data
397(1)
Blending Traditional and Alternative Data Collection Strategies
397(2)
Nondisabled Students and Severely Disabled Peers: All True Benefits Are Mutual
399(1)
Companionship
399(1)
Growth in Social Cognition and Self-Concept
399(1)
Development of Personal Principles
400(1)
Summary
400(1)
Suggested Activities
400(1)
References
401(4)
Nonsymbolic Communication
405(42)
Ellin Siegel
Amy Wetherby
Nonsymbolic Skills
407(2)
The Impact of the Disability
407(1)
The Trifocus of Intervention
408(1)
Early Communication Development
409(8)
Critical Aspects of Communication
409(1)
A Three-Stage Communication Progression
410(4)
Recognizing Nonsymbolic Communication
414(3)
The Capacity for Symbols
417(1)
Assessment
417(14)
Assessment: Understanding the Nonsymbolic Communicator
418(7)
Strategies for Assessing Nonsymbolic Communication
425(1)
Assessment: Understanding the Social Environment
426(4)
Assessment: Understanding the Physical Environment
430(1)
Teaching
431(11)
Methods to Promote Communication
431(2)
Communication Intervention Guidelines
433(8)
Using the Intervention Guidelines: Examples
441(1)
Summary
442(1)
Suggested Activities
442(1)
References
442(5)
Teaching Functional Communication Skills
447(42)
Ann P. Kaiser
Joan C. Grim
Naturalistic Approaches to Teaching Communication
447(3)
Overview of Enhanced Milieu Teaching
450(5)
Three Naturalistic Strategies
450(2)
Considerations for AAC
452(1)
Naturalistic Teaching Procedures and Students with Autism
453(1)
The Goals of Language Intervention
454(1)
EMT Strategies
455(11)
Guidelines for Using EMT
455(3)
Core Milieu Teaching Procedures
458(5)
When to Use Each of the Four Procedures
463(1)
Environmental Arrangement Strategies
463(3)
Using Environmental Arrangements to Promote Peer Interactions
466(4)
Responsive Conversational Style
466(3)
Research on Milieu Teaching and EMT
469(1)
Implementing Enhanced Milieu Teaching
470(15)
Data Collection and Evaluation
470(1)
How to Use EMT
471(2)
Assessment
473(4)
Generalized Skills Teaching
477(3)
Designing an Optimal Teaching Approach
480(5)
Summary
485(1)
Suggested Activities
485(1)
References
485(4)
General Curriculum Access
489(37)
Diane M. Browder
Lynn Ahlgrim-Delzell
Ginevra Courtade-Little
Martha E. Snell
The Meaning of Having Access to the General Education Curriculum
490(3)
Legal Precedents for Access to General Curriculum
491(1)
Increasing Expectations for Students with Severe Disabilities
492(1)
Can Students with Severe Disabilities Master Academic Skills?
492(1)
Ways to Create Access to the General Curriculum
493(9)
Use Universal Design of Curriculum for All Students
493(1)
Promote Self-Directed Learning
494(1)
Apply Direct, Systematic Instruction to Teach Target Skills
495(1)
Developing Standards-Based IEPs
495(1)
Become Familiar with State Standards and Grade-Level Curriculum and Review Students' Needs
496(2)
Consider the ``Critical Function''
498(1)
Promote Active Participation
498(1)
Use Functional Activities to Address Academic Skills
499(1)
Find Opportunities to Practice Self-Determination
500(1)
Apply Levels of Symbol Use to Guide Instruction
500(2)
Language Arts Instruction
502(9)
Creating Access to Language Arts for Students with Severe Disabilities
502(6)
Expanding Symbolic Reading: Bridging to Literacy
508(1)
Comprehension Skills
509(1)
Teaching Writing Skills
510(1)
Math Instruction
511(7)
Presymbolic Math Instruction
512(1)
Early Symbolic Math
513(5)
Other Academic Areas
518(3)
Science
519(1)
Social Studies
519(2)
Summary
521(1)
Suggested Activities
521(1)
References
521(5)
Home and Community
526(43)
Linda M. Bambara
Diane M. Browder
Freya Koger
Planning Instruction to Enhance Skills for Home and the Community
527(2)
Self-Determination: A New Era for Instruction
528(1)
Guidelines to Plan Instruction
529(1)
Guideline One: Use Person-Centered Planning Strategies
529(3)
Structured Action Planning
529(2)
Collaborative Meetings
531(1)
Guideline Two: Enhance Choice-Making, Self-Cuing, and Self-Management Skills
532(5)
Choice
533(1)
Self-Cuing
533(2)
Self-Management
535(2)
Guideline Three: Choose Appropriate Instructional Settings, Plan for Generalization, and Use Efficient Strategies
537(5)
Choosing the Instructional Setting
537(2)
Plan for Generalization: General Case Instruction
539(2)
Efficient Teaching Strategies
541(1)
Guideline Four: Use Transition Planning to Focus Community-Based Instruction
542(1)
Resources for Planning Instructional Support
543(20)
Skills for the Home
543(11)
Skills for the Community
554(9)
Summary
563(1)
Suggested Activities
563(1)
References
563(6)
Vocational Preparation and Transition
569(41)
Katherine J. Inge
M. Sherril Moon
Valued Employment Outcomes
571(1)
Defining Transition
572(1)
Characteristics of Effective Vocational Preparation and Transition Programs
573(2)
Supporting Families
573(2)
Available Vocational Services and Supports in the Community
575(1)
Vocational Rehabilitation
575(4)
One-Stop Career Center System
576(1)
Eligibility
577(1)
Medicaid Home and Community-Based Waiver
578(1)
Social Security Benefit Issues Affecting Transition Age Youth
579(4)
Eligibility
580(1)
Ticket to Work Program
581(1)
Social Security Work Incentives
581(2)
Determining Student Preferences and Interests
583(1)
Balancing Vocational Preparation with Inclusion and Other Integrated Opportunities
583(2)
Collaborating with a Team for Successful Transition
585(1)
Individual Transition Planning and the IEP
586(1)
School-Based Vocational Preparation
586(13)
Longitudinal Instruction of Work-Related Skills Across Grades and Settings
587(1)
Continual Assessment of Work Preferences and Interests
588(1)
Community-Referenced Employment Training Based on the Local Economy
589(1)
Job Training Across a Variety of Real Jobs in Real Employment Settings
590(1)
Establish Community-Based Training Sites
591(3)
Community-Based Training Sites Meet Labor Law Requirements
594(1)
Selecting Systematic Behavioral Procedures to Teach Vocational Skills
595(4)
Special Considerations for Students with Physical Disabilities
599(2)
Paid Employment
601(5)
Employment Support After Graduation
605(1)
Summary
606(1)
Suggested Activities
606(1)
References
606(4)
The Promise of Adulthood
610(28)
Philip M. Ferguson
Dianne L. Ferguson
Exploring the Promise of Adulthood
611(1)
Understanding Adulthood
612(7)
The Changing Status of Adulthood
612(1)
The Dimensions of Adulthood
613(6)
Denying Adulthood
619(6)
Unending Childhood
620(1)
Unfinished Transition
621(1)
Unhelpful Services
622(2)
The Dilemma of Adulthood
624(1)
Achieving Adulthood
625(5)
The Concept of Support
625(1)
What is New About Supported Adulthood?
626(1)
Components of Supported Adulthood
626(4)
Dimensions of Adulthood Revisited
630(5)
Supported Autonomy
630(2)
Supported Membership
632(1)
Supported Change
632(2)
Multidimensional Adulthood
634(1)
Some Dangers Ahead
634(1)
Suggested Activities
635(1)
References
635(3)
Name Index 638(11)
Subject Index 649


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