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Interaction Design : Beyond Human-Computer Interaction,9780471492788
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Interaction Design : Beyond Human-Computer Interaction

by ; ;
ISBN13:

9780471492788

ISBN10:
0471492787
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
2/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Wiley
List Price: $98.66

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Summary

The book covers psychological and social aspects of user/s, interaction styles, user requirements, design approaches, usability and evaluation, traditional and future interface paradigms and the role of theory in informing design. The topics will be grounded in the design process and the aim is to present relevant issues in an integrated and coherent way, rather than assembling a collection of chapters on individual HCI topics. This book is intended for undergraduate students in computing, graphic design, web design and multimedia.

Table of Contents

What is interaction design?
1(34)
Introduction
1(1)
Good and poor design
2(4)
What to design
4(2)
What is interaction design?
6(6)
The makeup of interaction design
6(3)
Working together as a multidisciplinary team
9(1)
Interaction design in business
10(2)
What is involved in the process of interaction design?
12(1)
The goals of interaction design
13(7)
Usability goals
14(4)
User experience goals
18(2)
More on usability: design and usability principles
20(11)
Heuristics and usability principles
26(5)
Interview with Gitta Salomon
31(4)
Understanding and conceptualizing interaction
35(38)
Introduction
35(1)
Understanding the problem space
36(3)
Conceptual models
39(16)
Conceptual models based on activities
41(10)
Conceptual models based on objects
51(3)
A case of mix and match?
54(1)
Interface metaphors
55(5)
Interaction paradigms
60(4)
From conceptual models to physical design
64(6)
Interview with Terry Winograd
70(3)
Understanding users
73(32)
Introduction
73(1)
What is cognition?
74(16)
Applying knowledge from the physical world to the digital world
90(2)
Conceptual frameworks for cognition
92(9)
Mental models
92(4)
Information processing
96(2)
External cognition
98(3)
Informing design: from theory to practice
101(4)
Designing for collaboration and communication
105(36)
Introduction
105(1)
Social mechanisms used in communication and collaboration
106(23)
Conversational mechanisms
107(3)
Designing collaborative technologies to support conversation
110(8)
Coordination mechanisms
118(4)
Designing collaborative technologies to support coordination
122(2)
Awareness mechanisms
124(2)
Designing collaborative technologies to support awareness
126(3)
Ethnographic studies of collaboration and communication
129(1)
Conceptual frameworks
130(8)
The language/action framework
130(3)
Distributed cognition
133(5)
Interview with Abigail Sellen
138(3)
Understanding how interfaces affect users
141(24)
Introduction
141(1)
What are affective aspects?
142(1)
Expressive interfaces
143(4)
User frustration
147(6)
Dealing with user frustration
152(1)
A debate: the application of anthropomorphism to interaction design
153(4)
Virtual characters: agents
157(8)
Kinds of agents
157(3)
General design concerns
160(5)
The process of interaction design
165(36)
Introduction
165(1)
What is interaction design about?
166(4)
Four basic activities of interaction design
168(2)
Three key characteristics of the interaction design process
170(1)
Some practical issues
170(12)
Who are the users?
171(1)
What do we mean by ``needs''?
172(2)
How do you generate alternative designs?
174(5)
How do you choose among alternative designs?
179(3)
Lifecycle models: showing how the activities are related
182(16)
A simple lifecycle model for interaction design
186(1)
Lifecycle models in software engineering
187(5)
Lifecycle models in HCI
192(6)
Interview with Gillian Crampton Smith
198(3)
Identifying needs and establishing requirements
201(38)
Introduction
201(1)
What, how, and why?
202(2)
What are we trying to achieve in this design activity?
202(1)
How can we achieve this?
202(1)
Why bother? The importance of getting it right
203(1)
Why establish requirements?
204(1)
What are requirements?
204(6)
Different kinds of requirements
205(5)
Data gathering
210(9)
Data-gathering techniques
211(4)
Choosing between techniques
215(1)
Some basic data-gathering guidelines
216(3)
Data interpretation and analysis
219(3)
Task description
222(9)
Scenarios
223(3)
Use cases
226(3)
Essential use cases
229(2)
Task analysis
231(5)
Hierarchical Task Analysis (HTA)
231(5)
Interview with Suzanne Robertson
236(3)
Design, prototyping and construction
239(40)
Introduction
239(1)
Prototyping and construction
240(9)
What is a prototype?
240(1)
Why prototype?
241(2)
Low-fidelity prototyping
243(2)
High-fidelity prototyping
245(1)
Compromises in prototyping
246(2)
Construction: from design to implementation
248(1)
Conceptual design: moving from requirements to first design
249(15)
Three perspectives for developing a conceptual model
250(7)
Expanding the conceptual model
257(2)
Using scenarios in conceptual design
259(3)
Using prototypes in conceptual design
262(2)
Physical design: getting concrete
264(11)
Guidelines for physical design
266(2)
Different kinds of widget
268(7)
Tool support
275(4)
User-centered approaches to interaction design
279(38)
Introduction
279(1)
Why is it important to involve users at all?
280(5)
Degrees of involvement
281(4)
What is a user-centered approach?
285(3)
Understanding users' work: applying ethnography in design
288(18)
Coherence
293(2)
Contextual Design
295(11)
Involving users in design: Participatory Design
306(7)
PICTIVE
307(2)
CARD
309(4)
Interview with Karen Holtzblatt
313(4)
Introducing evaluation
317(22)
Introduction
317(1)
What, why, and when to evaluate
318(6)
What to evaluate
318(1)
Why you need to evaluate
319(4)
When to evaluate
323(1)
Hutch World case study
324(12)
How the team got started: early design ideas
324(3)
How was the testing done?
327(6)
Was it tested again?
333(1)
Looking to the future
334(2)
Discussion
336(3)
An evaluation framework
339(20)
Introduction
339(1)
Evaluation paradigms and techniques
340(8)
Evaluation paradigms
341(4)
Techniques
345(3)
Decide: A framework to guide evaluation
348(8)
Determine the goals
348(1)
Explore the questions
349(1)
Choose the evaluation paradigm and techniques
349(1)
Identify the practical issues
350(1)
Decide how to deal with the ethical issues
351(4)
Evaluate, interpret, and present the data
355(1)
Pilot studies
356(3)
Observing users
359(30)
Introduction
359(1)
Goals, questions and paradigms
360(4)
What and when to observe
361(2)
Approaches to observation
363(1)
How to observe
364(9)
In controlled environments
365(3)
In the field
368(2)
Participant observation and ethnography
370(3)
Data collection
373(4)
Notes plus still camera
374(1)
Audio recording plus still camera
374(1)
Video
374(3)
Indirect observation: tracking users' activities
377(2)
Diaries
377(1)
Interaction logging
377(2)
Analyzing, interpreting and presenting data
379(8)
Qualitative analysis to tell a story
380(1)
Qualitative analysis for categorization
381(3)
Quantitative data analysis
384(1)
Feeding the findings back into design
384(3)
Interview with Sara Bly
387(2)
Asking users and experts
389(40)
Introduction
389(1)
Aking users: interviews
390(8)
Developing questions and planning an interview
390(2)
Unstructured interviews
392(2)
Structured interviews
394(1)
Semi-structured interviews
394(2)
Group interviews
396(1)
Other sources of interview-like feedback
397(1)
Data analysis and interpretation
398(1)
Asking users: Questionnaires
398(9)
Designing questionnaires
398(2)
Question and response format
400(4)
Administering questionnaires
404(1)
Online questionnaires
405(2)
Analyzing questionnaire data
407(1)
Asking experts: Inspections
407(13)
Heuristic evaluation
408(2)
Doing heuristic evaluation
410(2)
Heuristic evaluation of websites
412(7)
Heuristics for other devices
419(1)
Asking experts: walkthroughs
420(6)
Cognitive walkthroughs
420(3)
Pluralistic walkthroughs
423(3)
Interview with Jakob Nielsen
426(3)
Testing and modeling users
429(32)
Introduction
429(1)
User testing
430(8)
Testing MEDLINEplus
432(6)
Doing user testing
438(5)
Determine the goals and explore the questions
439(1)
Choose the paradigm and techniques
439(1)
Identify the practical issues: Design typical tasks
439(1)
Identify the practical issues: Select typical users
440(1)
Identify the practical issues: Prepare the testing conditions
441(1)
Identify the practical issues: Plan how to run the tests
442(1)
Deal with ethical issues
443(1)
Evaluate, analyze, and present the data
443(1)
Experiments
443(5)
Variables and conditions
444(1)
Allocation of participants to conditions
445(1)
Other practical issues
446(1)
Data collection and analysis
446(2)
Predictive models
448(9)
The GOMS model
449(1)
The Keystroke level model
450(3)
Benefits and limitations of GOMS
453(1)
Fitts' Law
454(3)
Interview with Ben Shneiderman
457(4)
Design and evaluation in the real world: communicators and advisory systems
461(30)
Introduction
461(1)
Key Issues
462(1)
Designing mobile communicators
463(19)
Background
463(1)
Nokia's approach to developing a communicator
464(10)
Philip's approach to designing a communicator for children
474(8)
Redesigning part of a large interactive phone-based response system
482(9)
Background
483(1)
The redesign
483(8)
Reflections from the Authors 491(2)
References 493(10)
Credits 503(6)
Index 509


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