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Interiors : An Introduction,9780072965209
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Interiors : An Introduction

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780072965209

ISBN10:
0072965207
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/18/2006
Publisher(s):
MCGRAW HILL PROFESSIONAL
List Price: $130.95

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This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 1/18/2006.
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Summary

Interiors: An Introductionis the starting point for a lifetime of design education, appreciation, and enjoyment. Whether the goal is a career in interior design, or simply a better understanding of how to enhance one's own living space, the information and ideas in this text will help readers achieve it.Interiorsoffers an introduction to the elements, practice, and aesthetics of residential and nonresidential interior design, as well as their application. In addition, the authors describe the numerous choices of materials, furnishings, and components used in interior design.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
The Process and Profession of Design
Interior Design: A Lifetime Pursuit
2(3)
The Language of Design
3(1)
Residential and Nonresidential Interior Design
3(1)
Residential Interiors and Well-Being
4(1)
The Need for Interior Design
4(1)
The Process of Design
5(19)
The Letter of Agreement
5(1)
The Problem Statement
6(1)
Research and Programming
6(10)
Writing the Program
16(1)
Design Development: Solving the Problem
16(7)
Postoccupancy Evaluation
23(1)
Nonresidential Considerations
23(1)
The Interior Design Profession
24(15)
The Design Profession: Past and Present
25(1)
Designer Skills
25(1)
Training and Professional Development
26(1)
Interior Design Resources
27(4)
Careers in Interior Design
31(5)
The Future of Interior Design
36(3)
Special Considerations in Design
Important Design Considerations
39(1)
Environmental Considerations
39(7)
Sustainability
39(3)
Green Design
42(1)
Other Environmental Issues
43(3)
Considerations for Special Needs Users
46(2)
Universal Design
46(1)
The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
46(1)
Accessible Design
47(1)
Design for Special Populations
48(7)
Design for Motion Impairments
48(3)
Design for Hearing Impairment
51(1)
Design for Visual Impairment
52(1)
Design for the Elderly
53(1)
Other Special Populations
53(2)
Special Design Considerations as Fundamental Goals
55(3)
Design Principles and Elements
The Principles of Design
58(8)
Scale
58(1)
Proportion
59(1)
Balance
60(2)
Rhythm
62(1)
Emphasis
63(1)
Harmony: Variety and Unity
64(2)
The Elements of Design
66(10)
Space
66(1)
Shape or Form
67(1)
Mass
68(1)
Line
69(2)
Texture
71(1)
Pattern
71(2)
Light
73(1)
Color
74(1)
Structural and Decorative Design
75(1)
Design Discernment and Excellence
76(6)
Cost Is Not the Issue
76(1)
Training the Eye
77(2)
Finding a Personal Style
79(3)
Color
How We See Color
82(2)
Subtractive Color
82(1)
Visual Acuity and Deficiency
82(1)
Metamerism
82(2)
Color Theory
84(4)
The Standard Color-Wheel Theory
84(3)
The Munsell Theory
87(1)
Other Color Theories
88(1)
Color Harmony
88(6)
Considerations in Color Harmonizing
88(1)
Neutralized Colors
89(1)
Neutrals
90(2)
Other Color-Influencing Factors
92(2)
Color Psychology
94(3)
Afterimage Simultaneous Contrast
94(1)
The Color Trend Market
94(3)
Residential and Nonresidential Uses of Color
97(5)
Color in Residential Interiors
97(1)
Nonresidential Considerations
98(4)
Lighting and Technology
Lighting in Interior Design
102(1)
Natural Light
102(2)
Combustion Lighting
103(1)
Artificial Lighting
104(6)
Categories of Lighting Effects
107(3)
Lighting Effects in the Interior
110(1)
Light and the Mind and Body
110(4)
Seasonal Affective Disorder
111(2)
Manipulating Mood with Interior Lighting
113(1)
Glare
113(1)
Power Terminology and Units of Measurement
114(1)
Luminaires, or Lighting Fixtures
115(1)
Architectural Lighting
115(1)
Built-In Indirect Lighting
115(1)
Lighting Economy
115(1)
Lighting for the Future
115(1)
Nonresidential Considerations
116(3)
Types of Nonresidential Lighting
116(3)
Lighting Economy in Nonresidential Interiors
119(1)
Nonresidential Lighting for the Future
119(1)
Technology
119(9)
Information-Age Home Automation Systems
120(1)
Information-Age Wiring and Installation
121(2)
Wiring Plans
123(1)
Residential Built-In Systems
124(1)
Nonresidential Communication and Safety Systems
125(3)
Space Planning Considerations
Prioritizing Needs and Wants
128(8)
Function First
128(1)
Interrelating Functions
129(1)
Brainstorming
129(1)
New Construction versus Remodeling
130(3)
Economic Considerations
133(1)
Other Factors That Affect Economy in Planning Home Space
134(2)
Features and Benefits
136(1)
Considerations for Specific Areas
136(24)
The Entry or Foyer
136(3)
Formal Living Spaces
139(1)
Home Office Planning
139(4)
The Library
143(1)
Kitchen and Great Room Planning
143(8)
The Laundry Room
151(1)
Master Suite Planning
152(2)
Family Bathrooms
154(3)
Children's Spaces
157(1)
Indoor-Outdoor Living
158(1)
Media and Entertainment Rooms
158(1)
Hobby and Special-Use Areas
159(1)
Storage
159(1)
Space Planning and the Principles and Elements of Design
160(4)
Living with Less Space
161(1)
Making Large Spaces Seem Smaller
162(1)
Traffic Patterns
162(1)
Rethinking the Box---Planning for Flexibility
163(1)
Nonresidential Considerations
164(8)
Function and Zoning
164(4)
Traffic Patterns
168(4)
Floor Plans and Building Systems
Floor Plans
172(1)
Diagramming and Floor Plans
173(2)
Measurements of Space: Cubic and Square Footage
173(2)
Shaping the Space
175(1)
Site, Orientation, and Climate
175(1)
Floor Plans and Housing
175(13)
Floor Plan Symbols
175(1)
Floor Plan Types
175(1)
Types of Housing
175(7)
Buying an Existing Home
182(1)
Obtaining the Floor Plan
182(4)
Construction Documents: Working Drawings or Blueprints
186(1)
Who Will Do the Work
187(1)
Constructing the Building
188(7)
Structural Building Components and Systems
189(6)
The Critical Path and the Punch List
195(1)
Insulation and Energy Conservation
195(6)
Active and Passive Solar Systems
195(6)
Green Design
201(1)
Nonresidential Considerations
201(9)
Nonresidential Plumbing, HVAC, and Indoor Air Quality
204(4)
Life Safety
208(1)
Systems within the Plenum
208(2)
Furniture Arrangement
Function
210(2)
Combining Functions
210(1)
Mechanical Functions
210(1)
Circulation
210(2)
Human Factors
212(4)
Anthropometrics
212(1)
Standard Clearances
212(1)
Proxemics
212(3)
Crowding
215(1)
Territoriality
215(1)
The Elements and Principles of Design
216(6)
Balance, Scale, and Mass
216(1)
Rhythm
217(1)
Emphasis
217(1)
Line and Harmony
218(1)
Form and Space
219(2)
Proportion
221(1)
Basic Groupings
222(3)
Nonresidential Considerations
225(5)
Function
225(1)
Nonresidential Furniture Types
225(1)
Planning for Systems Furniture
226(1)
Circulation
227(3)
Furniture Selection
Wooden Furniture
230(2)
Hardwood and Softwood
230(1)
Other Forms of Wood
230(1)
Case Goods
230(1)
Wood Grains
231(1)
Joining Methods
231(1)
Wood Finishes
232(1)
Metal Furniture
232(2)
Types of Metal
232(2)
Other Furniture Materials
234(2)
Plastic
234(1)
Leather
235(1)
Wicker, Rattan, Cane, and Rush
235(1)
Upholstered Furniture
236(1)
Frames
236(1)
Springs
236(1)
Cushioning
236(1)
Coverings
237(1)
Furniture Harmony and Human Factors
237(2)
Function
238(1)
Anthropometrics and Ergonomics
238(1)
Furniture Types
239(1)
Systems Furniture
239(1)
Ergonomic Superchairs
240(1)
Custom Designs
240(1)
Other Furniture Types
240(1)
Nonresidential Considerations
240(12)
Ergonomics
240(9)
Durability
249(3)
Architectural Detail
Walls
252(2)
Wood Paneling
252(1)
Moldings
253(1)
Doors
254(3)
Windows
257(3)
Stairs
260(4)
Fireplaces and Chimneypieces
264(2)
Ceilings
266(2)
Cabinetwork
268(1)
Nonresidential Considerations
268(4)
Wall, Ceiling, and Window Treatments
Wall and Ceiling Materials
272(10)
Selection Guidelines
272(1)
Hard or Rigid Wall Materials
273(9)
Paint
282(4)
Painting Guidelines
283(3)
Wall Coverings
286(4)
Wall-Covering Guidelines
286(3)
Fabric-Covered Walls
289(1)
Ceiling Treatments
290(1)
Window Treatments
290(14)
Window Treatment Considerations
290(3)
Soft Window Coverings
293(1)
Alternative Window Treatments
293(11)
Nonresidential Considerations
304(4)
Durability
304(1)
Nonresidential Ceiling Treatments
305(1)
Nonresidential Window Treatments
305(1)
Less Pattern
306(1)
Safety Codes
306(2)
Floor Materials and Coverings
Floor Requirements and Specifications
308(1)
Calculations and Costs
308(1)
Guidelines for Selecting Hard and Resilient Floor Materials
309(7)
Hard Floor Materials
309(5)
Resilient Floor Materials
314(2)
Soft Floor Coverings
316(12)
Carpeting
316(5)
Rugs
321(7)
Nonresidential Considerations
328(4)
Hard and Resilient Floorings
328(1)
Rugs and Carpeting
328(4)
Fabric
Fibers
332(8)
Fabric Maintenance
336(1)
Fabric Construction
336(3)
Finishes
339(1)
Obtaining Fabric
340(1)
Fabric---The Champion of Versatility
340(5)
The Human Touch
341(1)
Fabric Aesthetics
341(4)
Fabric Weight and Applications
345(1)
Nonresidential Considerations
345(1)
Decorative Fabric Glossary
345(11)
Art and Accessories
Fine Art
356(4)
Sculpture
356(1)
Painting
356(1)
Mosaic
357(1)
Drawing
357(1)
Printmaking
357(1)
Rubbings, Reproductions, and Graphic Art
358(1)
Obtaining Fine Art
358(2)
Preparing Art for Display
360(1)
Decorative Art
360(6)
Mirrors
360(1)
Tableware and Cookware
360(3)
Baskets
363(1)
Clocks
363(1)
Screens
363(1)
Decorative Light Fixtures
364(1)
Books
365(1)
Textiles
365(1)
Objects from Nature
366(1)
Plants
366(1)
Flowers and Greenery
367(1)
Other Natural Objects
367(1)
Other Accessories
367(1)
The Use of Accessories
368(2)
Collections
368(1)
Overall Considerations
369(1)
Emotionally Supportive Design
369(1)
Nonresidential Considerations
370(4)
Historic Design
Early Influences
374(12)
Greece (Fifth Century B.C.)
374(1)
Rome (200 B.C.--A.D. 400)
375(2)
The Middle Ages (800--1500)
377(5)
The Influence of Asia
382(1)
The Renaissance (1420--1650)
383(3)
The Baroque Period (1580--1750)
386(1)
The English Influence in America
386(10)
The Seventeenth-Century English Medieval Style (1608--95)
386(3)
The Early Georgian Style (1695--1750)
389(1)
The Late Georgian Style (1750--90)
390(6)
American Styles
396(24)
The Federal Style (1790--1830)
396(1)
Jeffersonian Federal
397(1)
The Vernacular Tradition (Seventeenth Century--Present)
397(3)
The Greek Revival/American Empire Style (1820--60)
400(5)
The Victorian Age in America (1837--1900)
405(5)
Other Influences In America
410(10)
The Beaux Arts Influence (1880--1945)
420(1)
Modern Design (1857--Present)
420(17)
The Skyscraper (1857--Present)
421(2)
Art Nouveau/Jugendstil (1890--1900)
423(1)
The Craftsman Style (1905--1929)
423(2)
Frank Lloyd Wright's Organic Architecture (1908--Present)
425(3)
Art Deco (1908--45)
428(1)
The International Style (1932--Present)
429(2)
Scandinavian and Mid-Century Design
431(4)
Contemporary Trends
435(2)
Putting Things in Perspective
437(4)
Preservation
438(3)
Glossary 441(39)
Index 480


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