9780415313629

An International Economic System

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780415313629

  • ISBN10:

    0415313627

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2003-09-24
  • Publisher: Routledge

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Summary

First published in 1954

Table of Contents

PREFACE vii
I AN OUTLINE OF THE SYSTEM 13(7)
II THE RELATION BETWEEN FOREIGN FACTORS AND NATIONAL INCOME 20(17)
1. The Foreign Trade Multiplier
20(2)
2. The Effect of Changes in Import and Export Prices on Real Income
22(2)
3. Imports for Consumption and Imports for Investment
24(1)
4. Induced Investment
25(2)
5. The Treatment of Lags
27(2)
6. Why Lags may not appear in the Multiplier Relationship
29(3)
7. The Treatment of Autonomous Investment
32(1)
8. Capital Imports and Autonomous Investment
32(3)
9. Autonomous Imports
35(2)
III EXPLANATION OF THE VOLUME OF IMPORTS OF INDIVIDUAL COUNTRIES 37(10)
1. Expanded Import Equation: Relative Prices
37(1)
2. Import Restrictions
37(3)
3. Import Restrictions and Relative Prices
40(1)
4. The International Reflection Ratio
41(1)
5. Further Discussion of the International Reflection Ratio
42(2)
6. The Total Effect of Changes in Relative Prices on Imports
44(2)
7. Direct Determination of the International Reflection Ratio
46(1)
IV EXPLANATION OF THE VOLUME OF EXPORTS OF INDIVIDUAL COUNTRIES 47(6)
1. Exports as the Main Foreign Factor
47(1)
2. The Problem of Aggregation: Use of World Trade
47(3)
3. Alternative Aggregation: Use of World Income
50(1)
4. Expanded Export Equation: Relative Prices
51(2)
V THE INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC SYSTEM 53(8)
1. The Endogenous System
53(2)
2. Two Categories of Shocks
55 (1)
3. Autonomous Investment
55(3)
4. Import Restrictions
58(1)
5. Changes in Relative Prices
58(3)
VI GENERAL STATISTICAL OBSERVATIONS 61(10)
1. Introduction
61(1)
2. The Correlation Technique
61(2)
3. The Need for Short Cuts
63(1)
4. Reliability of Coefficients
64(2)
5. The Indeterminacy of Propensities
66(2)
6. Separation of World Trade in its Two Main Components
68(1)
7. The Treatment of Invisibles
69(1)
8. The Combination of Instantaneous and Lagged Coefficients
70(1)
VII STATISTICAL RESULTS FOR INDIVIDUAL COUNTRIES 71(86)
Introduction
71 (4)
Europe
Czechoslovakia
75(2)
Denmark
77(3)
Finland
80(4)
France
84(4)
Germany
88(3)
Hungary
91(4)
Ireland
95(2)
Italy
97(2)
Netherlands
99(5)
Norway
104(3)
Sweden
107(3)
Switzerland
110(3)
United Kingdom
113(4)
Yugoslavia
117 (2)
British Dominions
Australia
119(4)
Canada
123(4)
New Zealand
127(5)
Union of South Africa
132 (3)
Far East
China
135(4)
India
139(1)
Indonesia
140(3)
Japan
143 (3)
Latin America
Argentina
146(3)
Chile
149(4)
United States
153(4)
VIII SUMMARY OF RESULTS 157(13)
1. Summary Table
157(1)
2. The Export Explanation
157(4)
3. The Multipliers
161(1)
4. The Import Explanation
161(1)
5. International Reflection Ratios
162(2)
6. The World Multiplier
164(1)
7. Application to the 1929-32 Depression
165(5)
ANNEX I DERIVATION OF COMBINED INFLUENCE OF EXTERNAL FACTORS 170(4)
ANNEX II SOURCES 174(3)
INDEX 177

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