9780803224049

International Human Rights and Authoritarian Rule in Chile

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780803224049

  • ISBN10:

    0803224044

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2002-04-01
  • Publisher: Univ of Nebraska Pr

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Summary

What is the influence of international human rights activism on authoritarian governments in the modern era? How much can pressure from human rights organizations and nations affect political change within a county? This book addresses these key issues by examining the impact of transnational human rights organizations and international norms on Chile during Gen. Augusto Pinochet's regime (197390) and afterward. Darren G. Hawkins argues that steadily mounting pressure from abroad concerning human rights did, in fact, make Pinochet more vulnerable over time and helped stimulate Chile's movement to a liberal democracy. Such international expectations could not be ignored by Pinochet, and they gradually and cumulatively made themselves felt. By 1975 some Chilean officials were adopting the discourse of human rights and claiming their adherence to international norms; two years later the government's security apparatus responsible for the reign of terror was reorganized, and disappearances in Chile nearly ceased. In 1980 the regime abandoned its insistence on unlimited authoritarian rule and approved a constitution that set term limits and promised future democratic institutions; Pinochet lost a constitutionally mandated plebiscite in 1988 and ultimately left office in 1990. Hawkins contends that these changes not only were internally driven but reflected an ongoing response to an international discourse on human rights. Well-researched and cogently argued, this case study further illuminates and complicates our understanding of modern Chilean history and provides ample testimony of the far-reaching effects of international human rights work.

Author Biography

Darren G. Hawkins is an assistant professor of political science at Brigham Young University. His articles have appeared in Comparative Politics, Political Science Quarterly, the European Journal of International Relations, and in contributed volumes.

Table of Contents

List of Tables
ix
Acknowledgments xi
Introduction 1(14)
Human Rights Pressures, Legitimacy, and State Responses
15(34)
Placing Human Rights on the Government's Agenda, 1973-1975
49(28)
Changing Discourse and Security Practices, 1976-1977
77(29)
Building New Political Institutions through the 1980 Constitution
106(32)
Legitimacy and Elections in the 1980s
138(34)
Chile in International and Comparative Perspective
172(33)
Notes 205(26)
Bibliography 231(20)
Index 251

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