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International Organizations : Perspectives on Governance in the Twenty-First Century,9780130454270
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International Organizations : Perspectives on Governance in the Twenty-First Century

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780130454270

ISBN10:
0130454273
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $84.00
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Summary

This book provides critical interpretations of international organizations from the perspectives of Marxism, Feminism, Realism, and Liberalism. Using case studies of current crises and events ranging the from Arab and Islamic organizations to the Palestinian uprising to the engineering of Genetically Modified Foods, it is a timely study of how organizations shape and influence world views. Using the perspectives from four approaches, Realism, Liberalism, Marxism, and Feminism, this book uses case studies to illustrate the importance of international organizations and their effect on the world. Topics are reflected by the case studies presented: International Security and the Persian Gulf Crisis and Srebrenica; Regional Security and NATO and the Arab League; Multinational Corporations and the US Clean Air Act and Genetically Modified Foods, Development and the Mexican Peso Crisis and the Indonesian Crisis; the Environment and Global Warming and Whaling; Human Rights and Yugoslavia and Rwanda. For workers in corporations with worldwide interests and for those employed by international organizations.

Table of Contents

Preface vii
Introduction
1(18)
Prior Studies of International Organizations: An Overview
2(3)
Organization of the Text
5(14)
International Organizations: Nuts and Bolts
19(20)
Intergovernmental Organizations
19(11)
The Organization of Islamic Conference
30(3)
Nongovernmental Organizations
33(3)
Multinational Corporations
36(2)
Conclusion
38(1)
Mainstream Approaches
39(31)
Realism
39(15)
Liberalism
54(16)
Critical Approaches
70(27)
Marxism
70(15)
Feminism
85(12)
International Security
97(31)
The United Nations
98(6)
Case Study 1: The Persian Gulf Crisis
104(12)
The Security Council and Iraq after the Gulf War
116(1)
Case Study 2: Srebrenica 1995
117(9)
Security Council Reforms
126(1)
Conclusion
127(1)
Regional Security
128(27)
Post-World War II Security Alliances
129(1)
Nato: History, Membership, and Structure
129(6)
Case Study 3: NATO Expansion
135(8)
NATO after the Balkans
143(2)
The Arab League
145(1)
Case Study 4: Palestinian Uprising 2000
146(7)
The Israeli-Palestinian Crisis after September 11
153(2)
Trade
155(22)
The History of International Trade
155(4)
The World Trade Organization (WTO)
159(3)
Multinational Corporations (MNCs)
162(1)
Case Study 5: The U.S. Clean Air Act
163(5)
Challenges for the WTO
168(2)
Case Study 6: Genetically Modified Foods and Organisms
170(6)
Conclusion
176(1)
Development
177(31)
What Is Development?
177(3)
Debt
180(1)
The World Bank Group
181(3)
The International Monetary Fund (IMF)
184(2)
The UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)
186(3)
The UN Development Program (UNDP)
189(1)
Case Study 7: The Mexican Peso Crisis
190(9)
Contagion?
199(1)
Case Study 8: Indonesia
200(7)
Conclusion
207(1)
The Environment
208(26)
The Tragedy of the Commons
208(3)
Environmental Problems
211(1)
The Stockholm Conference (1972)
212(1)
The UN Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS)
213(1)
Efforts to Protect Biodiversity
214(1)
The Vienna Convention of the Protection of the Ozone and the Montreal Protocol (1985)
215(1)
The Rio Conference
216(2)
Case Study 9: Global Warming
218(9)
Global Warming: A Postscript
227(1)
Case Study 10: Whaling
228(5)
Conclusion
233(1)
Social and Humanitarian Issues
234(27)
Refugees
234(3)
Major Human Rights Agreements
237(2)
UN Agencies and Human Rights
239(2)
Regional Human Rights Accords and Agencies
241(1)
NGOs and Human Rights
242(2)
Humanitarian Intervention
244(3)
Case Study 11: Rwanda
247(6)
Case Study 12: The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
253(7)
Conclusion
260(1)
Global Governance in 2075
261(46)
A Realist Cut
261(5)
A Liberal Cut
266(3)
A Marxist Cut
269(3)
A Feminist Cut
272(1)
Conclusion
273(1)
Appendices
Appendix A: Covenant of the League of Nations
274(9)
Appendix B: Charter of the United Nations
283(19)
Appendix C: Universal Declaration of Human Rights
302(4)
Appendix D: Purposes of the International Monetary Fund
306(1)
Bibliography 307(14)
Index 321

Excerpts

I WROTE THIS BOOK out of passion and frustration. International organizations are fascinating objects of stud: They are almost organic entities--evolving, changing, adapting, even dying. However, many texts on international organizations tend to view the lives of international organizations through liberal lenses. Liberal lenses are not exactly rose-colored, but they are colored by the implicit assumption that international organizations are inherently "good" and that their "good" efforts are often thwarted by organizational weaknesses, world politics, or self-interested governments. Liberalism has contributed much to our understanding of global politics, but it has its blind spots. Examining international organizations solely from a liberal vantage does a disservice to the study of international organizations and to its development as a discipline. It unnecessarily narrows analysis; worse, it suggests that just one view of the world exists. The September 11, 2001, attacks on the United States and the response of the "international community" highlight the need to understand the world from different perspectives in order to understand and manage complicated problems. This text brings other theoretical perspectives to bear on the study of international organizations. It integrates international organizations with international-relations theory by showing how international organizations matter in the worlds of the realist, the Marxist, and the feminist, as well as the liberal. Several people have contributed to the development of the second edition of this book. First, I thank the four reviewers who provided valuable insights and criticism: Timothy Nordstrom, University of Mississippi; Miriam Elman, Arizona State University; Lawrence LeBlanc, Marquette University; Ali R. Abootalebi, University of Wisconsin. I would also like to thank Bethany Keller, a graduate student in Webster University's International Relations Program, for her research on Indonesia. I thank my parents for their emotional support, and I would also like to acknowledge Webster University, which provided some financial assistance for research through its Faculty Research Grant Program. Finally, I would like to dedicate this book to Casey, Kelsey, and Ryley Peace. Kelly-Kate S. Peace


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