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Interpersonal Process in Therapy : An Integrative Model,9780534515645
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Interpersonal Process in Therapy : An Integrative Model

by
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780534515645

ISBN10:
0534515649
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
7/7/2005
Publisher(s):
Brooks Cole
List Price: $201.99
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Summary

PART ONE: AN INTERPERSONAL PROCESS APPROACH. 1. Introduction and Overview. PART TWO: RESPONDING TO CLIENTS. 2. Establishing a Working Alliance. 3. Honoring the Client's Resistance. 4. An Internal Focus for Change. 5. Responding to Painful Feelings. PART THREE: CONCEPTUALIZING CLIENT DYNAMICS AND FINDING A TREATMENT FOCUS. 6. Familial and Developmental Factors. 7. Inflexible Interpersonal Coping Strategies. 8. Interpersonal Patterns and Themes. PART FOUR: RESOLUTION AND CHANGE. 9. An Interpersonal Solution. 10. Resolution and Change. APPENDICES: A. Process Notes. B. Case Formulation Guidelines. BIBLIOGRAPHY. NAME INDEX. SUBJECT INDEX.

Table of Contents

FOREWORD xv
PREFACE xix
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xxiii
ABOUT THE AUTHOR xxv
PART 1 INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW 1(40)
CHAPTER 1 The Interpersonal Process Approach
3(38)
Therapists Need a Conceptual Framework
4(2)
Theoretical and Historical Context
6(12)
The Interpersonal Domain
6(2)
The Cognitive Domain
8(6)
The Familial/Contextual Domain
14(4)
Core Concepts
18(16)
The Process Dimension
18(2)
Corrective Emotional Experience
20(7)
Client Response Specificity
27(4)
Teresa: Case Illustration of Core Concepts
31(3)
Treatment Approach
34(4)
Limitations
36(1)
Aims
37(1)
Closing
38(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
39(2)
PART 2 RESPONDING TO CLIENTS 41(158)
CHAPTER 2 Establishing a Working Alliance
43(40)
Conceptual Overview
43(1)
The Working Alliance Is a Collaborative Relationship
44(9)
Collaboration: An Alternative to Directive and Nondirective Styles
45(4)
Collaboration Begins with the Initial Interview
49(4)
Empathic Understanding: The Foundation for a Working Alliance
53(17)
Clients Do Not Feel Understood
54(4)
Demonstrate Understanding
58(5)
Identify Recurrent Themes
63(7)
Immediacy: Working in the Moment
70(8)
Using Process Comments to Build a Working Alliance
70(6)
Using Process Comments to Repair Ruptures
76(2)
New Therapists Struggle with Performance Anxieties
78(2)
Care and Understanding as Preconditions of Change
80(1)
Closing
81(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
82(1)
CHAPTER 3 Honoring the Client's Resistance
83(39)
Conceptual Overview
83(2)
Reluctance to Address Resistance
85(7)
The Therapist's Reluctance
86(2)
The Client's Reluctance
88(4)
Identifying Resistance
92(1)
Formulating Working Hypotheses
93(4)
Responding to Resistance
97(18)
Addressing Resistance during the Initial Telephone Contact
97(4)
Exploring Resistance at the End of the First Session
101(8)
Resistance during Subsequent Sessions
109(6)
Shame Fuels Resistance
115(5)
Closing
120(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
121(1)
CHAPTER 4 An Internal Focus for Change
122(36)
Conceptual Overview
122(2)
Shifting to an Internal Focus
124(10)
A Prerequisite for Change
124(5)
Focusing Clients Inward
129(2)
Reluctance to Adopt an Internal Focus
131(3)
Placing the Locus of Change with Clients
134(12)
Fostering the Client's Initiative
135(6)
Interventions That Place Clients at the Fulcrum of Change
141(5)
Enlist Clients in Solving Their Own Problems
146(4)
Reenacting, Clients' Conflicts
146(2)
Providing a Corrective Emotional Experience
148(2)
Tracking Clients' Anxiety
150(6)
Observing Signs and Symptoms of Anxiety
151(1)
Approach Anxiety Directly
151(2)
Observing What Triggers the Anxiety
153(1)
Focusing Clients Inward to Explore Their Anxiety
154(2)
Closing
156(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
156(2)
CHAPTER 5 Responding to Painful Feelings
158(41)
Conceptual Overview
159(1)
Responding to Clients' Feelings
159(10)
Approaching Clients' Feelings
161(2)
Expand and Elaborate the Client's Affect
163(6)
Identifying the Predominant Affect
169(3)
An Old Wound
169(1)
Multiple Stressors
170(1)
A Characterological Affect
171(1)
Affective Constellations
172(6)
Anger-Sadness-Shame
172(4)
Sadness-Anger-Guilt
176(2)
Holding the Client's Pain
178(12)
Clients Resist Feelings to Avoid Interpersonal Consequences
179(3)
Providing a Holding Environment
182(5)
Change from the Inside Out
187(3)
Countertransference Prevents Therapists from Responding to Feelings
190(7)
The Therapist's Need to Be Liked
190(2)
Therapists Misperceive Their Responsibility
192(2)
Family Rules
194(2)
Situational Problems in the Therapist's Own Life
196(1)
Closing
197(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
198(1)
PART 3 CONCEPTUALIZING CLIENTS AND DEVELOPING A TREATMENT FOCUS 199(126)
CHAPTER 6 Familial and Developmental Factors
201(41)
Conceptual Overview
201(1)
Structural Family Relations
202(10)
Shifting Loyalties and Establishing a Marital Coalition
202(3)
The Parental Coalition Shapes Child Adjustment
205(7)
Balancing the Continuum of Separateness-Relatedness
212(4)
Child-Rearing Practices
216(7)
Authoritarian Parenting
216(3)
Permissive Parenting
219(1)
Disengaged/Dismissive Parenting
220(1)
Authoritative Parenting
221(2)
Other Child-Rearing and Attachment Issues
223(16)
Authoritarian and Disengaged Parenting, Love Withdrawal, and Insecure Attachment
223(8)
Permissive Parenting, Overinvolvement, and Insecure Attachment
231(1)
A Diversity of Parenting and Attachment Styles
232(3)
Clinical Implications for Working with Disrupted Ties
235(4)
Relating the Three Dimensions of Family Life
239(2)
Closing
241(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
241(1)
CHAPTER 7 Inflexible Interpersonal Coping Strategies
242(36)
Conceptual Overview
242(2)
Interpersonal Model for Conceptualizing Clients
244(15)
Blocked Developmental Needs
244(2)
Compromise Solutions
246(9)
Resolving the Core Conflict
255(4)
Case Study of Peter: Moving Toward Others
259(9)
Developmental History and Precipitating Crisis
259(2)
Precipitating Crisis, Maladaptive Relational Patterns and Symptom Development
261(2)
Course of Treatment
263(5)
Two Case Summaries
268(8)
Carlos: Moving Against Others
268(4)
Maggie: Moving Away from Others
272(4)
Closing
276(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
276(2)
CHAPTER 8 Interpersonal Themes and Patterns
278(47)
Conceptual Overview
278(1)
How Clients Reenact Their Problems with Others in the Therapeutic Relationship
279(29)
Eliciting Maneuvers
280(7)
Testing Behavior
287(12)
Transference Reactions
299(9)
Optimum Interpersonal Balance
308(9)
Enmeshment
309(2)
Disengagement
311(1)
Optimum Middle Ground of Effective Involvement
312(5)
Enduring Problems Tend to Be Paradoxical and Ambivalent
317(5)
The Two Sides of Clients' Conflicts
317(2)
Exploring Ambivalent Feelings
319(3)
Closing
322(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
323(2)
PART 4 RESOLUTION AND CHANGE 325(76)
CHAPTER 9 An Interpersonal Solution
327(41)
Conceptual Overview
327(2)
Resolving Problems through the Interpersonal Process
329(20)
Bringing Clients' Conflicts into the Therapeutic Relationship
329(4)
Using the Process Dimension to Facilitate Change
333(15)
Providing a Corrective Emotional Experience
348(1)
Interpersonal Process Interventions
349(5)
Therapists' Initial Reluctance to Work with the Process Dimension
354(11)
Closing
365(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
366(2)
CHAPTER 10 Working Through and Termination
368(33)
Conceptual Overview
368(1)
Working Through
368(23)
The Course of Client Change: An Overview
368(3)
The Working-Through Process
371(10)
Going from Current Problems, through Family-of-Origin Work, and on to "the Dream"
381(10)
Termination
391(8)
Accepting That the Relationship Must End
393(5)
Ending the Relationship
398(1)
Closing
399(1)
Suggestions for Further Reading
399(2)
APPENDIX A PROCESS NOTES 401(2)
APPENDIX B CASE FORMULATION GUIDELINES 403(4)
REFERENCES 407(9)
NAME INDEX 416(3)
SUBJECT INDEX 419


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