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Intimate Relationships,9780072938012
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Intimate Relationships

by ; ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780072938012

ISBN10:
0072938013
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/26/2006
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages
List Price: $87.78

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This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 1/26/2006.
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Summary

The fourth edition of this trusted text preserves the personal appeal of the subject matter and vigorous standards of scholarship that have made the earlier editions so successful. Written in a unified voice, this text features the reader-friendly tone that was established in the first three editions and presents the key findings on intimate relationships, the major theoretical perspectives, and some of the current controversies in the field. Brehm, Miller, Perlman, and Campbell illustrate the relevance of close relationship science to readers' everyday lives, encouraging thought and analysis. The new edition includes more illustrations, tables, and figures that complement the thoroughly updated, new-and-improved text.

Table of Contents

Foreword xiv
Preface xvi
Part One AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS
The Building Blocks of Relationships
3(37)
The Nature and Importance of Intimacy
4(4)
The Nature of Intimacy
4(2)
The Need to Belong
6(2)
The Influence of Culture
8(7)
Sources of Change
12(3)
The Influence of Experience
15(3)
The Influence of Individual Differences
18(13)
Sex Differences
19(4)
Gender Differences
23(3)
Personality
26(2)
Self-Esteem
28(3)
The Influence of Human Nature
31(4)
The Influence of Interaction
35(1)
The Dark Side of Relationships
35(1)
For Your Consideration
36(1)
Chapter Summary
36(4)
Research Methods
40(35)
A Brief History of Relationship Science
41(5)
Developing a Question
46(1)
Obtaining Participants
47(4)
Choosing a Design
51(5)
Correlational Designs
51(2)
Experimental Designs
53(1)
Developmental Designs
54(2)
Selecting a Setting
56(2)
The Nature of Our Data
58(7)
Self-Reports
59(3)
Observations
62(2)
Physiological Measures
64(1)
Archival Materials
64(1)
Couples' Reports
65(1)
The Ethics of Such Endeavors
65(1)
Interpreting and Integrating Results
66(2)
A Final Note
68(1)
For Your Consideration
69(1)
Chapter Summary
69(6)
Part Two BASIC PROCESSES IN INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS
Attraction
75(35)
The Fundamental Basis of Attraction: A Matter of Rewards
75(1)
Proximity: Liking Those Near Us
76(4)
Convenience: Proximity Is Rewarding, Distance Is Costly
78(1)
Familiarity: Repeated Contact
78(2)
The Power of Proximity
80(1)
Physical Attractiveness: Liking Those Who Are Lovely
80(13)
The Bias for Beauty: ``What Is Beautiful Is Good''
80(2)
Who's Pretty?
82(4)
An Evolutionary Perspective on Physical Attractiveness
86(2)
Culture Matters, Too
88(1)
Who Has a Bias for Beauty?
88(2)
The Interactive Costs and Benefits of Beauty
90(2)
Matching in Physical Attractiveness
92(1)
Reciprocity: Liking Those Who Like Us
93(1)
Similarity: Liking Those Who Are Like Us
94(10)
What Kind of Similarity?
96(1)
Do Opposites Attract?
97(7)
Why Is Similarity Attractive?
104(1)
Barriers: Liking Those We Cannot Have
104(1)
So, What Do Men and Women Want?
105(1)
For Your Consideration
106(1)
Chapter Summary
106(4)
Social Cognition
110(37)
First Impressions (and Beyond)
111(6)
The Power of Perceptions
117(16)
Idealizing Our Partners
117(1)
Attributional Processes
118(3)
Memories
121(1)
Relationship Beliefs
122(4)
Expectations
126(4)
Self-Perceptions
130(3)
Impression Management
133(5)
Strategies of Impression Management
134(1)
Impression Management in Close Relationships
135(3)
So, Just How Well Do We Know Our Partners?
138(4)
Knowledge
138(1)
Motivation
139(1)
Partner Legibility
139(1)
Perceiver Ability
140(1)
Threatening Perceptions
140(1)
Perceiver Influence
141(1)
Summary
142(1)
For Your Consideration
142(1)
Chapter Summary
142(5)
Communication
147(35)
Nonverbal Communication
148(13)
Components of Nonverbal Communication
150(6)
Nonverbal Sensitivity
156(3)
Sex Differences in Nonverbal Communication
159(2)
Verbal Communication
161(9)
Self-Disclosure
161(5)
Gender Differences in Verbal Communication
166(4)
Dysfunctional Communication and What to Do About It
170(7)
Miscommunication
171(1)
Saying What We Mean
172(2)
Active Listening
174(1)
Being Polite and Staying Cool
175(2)
The Power of Respect and Validation
177(1)
For Your Consideration
177(1)
Chapter Summary
178(4)
Interdependency
182(37)
Social Exchange
182(9)
Rewards and Costs
183(1)
What Do We Expect from Our Relationships?
183(1)
How Well Could We Do Elsewhere?
184(3)
Four Types of Relationships
187(2)
CL and CLalt as Time Goes By
189(2)
The Economies of Relationships
191(10)
Rewards and Costs as Time Goes By
197(4)
Are We Really This Greedy?
201(9)
The Nature of Interdependency
202(1)
Exchange versus Communal Relationships
203(3)
Equitable Relationships
206(3)
Summing Up
209(1)
The Nature of Commitment
210(4)
The Consequences of Commitment
213(1)
For Your Consideration
214(1)
Chapter Summary
214(5)
Part Three FRIENDSHIP AND INTIMACY
Friendship
219(25)
The Nature of Friendship
220(7)
Attributes of Friendships
220(5)
The Rules of Friendship
225(2)
Friendship Across the Life Cycle
227(8)
Infancy
227(1)
Childhood
227(2)
Adolescence
229(2)
Young Adulthood
231(1)
Midlife
232(1)
Old Age
233(2)
Differences in Friendship
235(5)
Gender Differences in Same-Sex Friendships
235(2)
Individual Differences in Friendship
237(3)
For Your Consideration
240(1)
Chapter Summary
241(3)
Love
244(32)
A Brief History of Love
245(1)
Types of Love
246(15)
The Triangular Theory of Love
246(4)
Romantic, Passionate Love
250(8)
Companionate Love
258(2)
Styles of Loving
260(1)
Individual Differences in Love
261(8)
Attachment Styles
261(7)
Age
268(1)
Men and Women
268(1)
Does Love Last?
269(4)
Why Doesn't Romantic Love Last?
271(2)
So, What Does the Future Hold?
273(1)
For Your Consideration
273(1)
Chapter Summary
274(2)
Sexuality
276(31)
Sexual Attitudes
277(3)
Attitudes about Casual Sex
277(1)
Attitudes about Same-Sex Sexuality
278(1)
Cultural Differences in Sexual Attitudes
279(1)
Sexual Behavior
280(12)
Premarital Sex
280(2)
Sex in Committed Relationships
282(1)
Monogamy
282(6)
Sexual Desire
288(1)
Preventing Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infections
289(3)
Sexual Satisfaction
292(4)
Sexual Frequency and Satisfaction
293(1)
Sex and Relationship Satisfaction
293(1)
Interdependency Theory and Sexual Satisfaction
294(2)
Sexual Communication
296(3)
Communicating Desire
296(1)
Sexual Communication and Satisfaction
297(2)
Sexual Aggression
299(2)
For Your Consideration
301(1)
Chapter Summary
301(6)
Part Four RELATIONSHIP ISSUES
Stresses and Strains
307(37)
Relational Evaluation
307(2)
Hurt Feelings
309(3)
Ostracism
312(2)
Jealousy
314(13)
Two Types of Jealousy
315(1)
Who's Prone to Jealousy?
316(2)
Who Gets Us Jealous?
318(1)
What Gets Us Jealous?
319(6)
Responses to Jealousy
325(1)
Coping Constructively with Jealousy
326(1)
Deception and Lying
327(6)
Lying in Close and Casual Relationships
327(2)
Lies and Liars
329(1)
So, How Well Can We Detect a Partner's Deception?
330(3)
Betrayal
333(4)
Individual Differences in Betrayal
334(1)
The Two Sides to Every Betrayal
334(2)
Coping with Betrayal
336(1)
Forgiveness
337(1)
For Your Consideration
338(1)
Chapter Summary
339(5)
Power
344(17)
Power and Interdependency Theory
345(12)
Sources of Power
345(2)
Types of Resources
347(3)
The Process of Power
350(5)
The Outcome of Power
355(2)
The Two Sides of Power
357(1)
For Your Consideration
358(1)
Chapter Summary
359(2)
Conflict and Violence
361(34)
The Nature of Conflict
361(4)
What Is Conflict?
361(2)
The Frequency of Conflict
363(2)
The Course of Conflict
365(12)
Instigating Events
365(2)
Attributions
367(2)
Engagement and Escalation
369(2)
The Demand/Withdraw Pattern
371(2)
Negotiation and Accommodation
373(2)
Dealing with Conflict: Four Types of Couples
375(2)
The Outcomes of Conflict
377(2)
Ending Conflict
377(1)
Can Fighting Be Good for a Relationship?
378(1)
Violence and Abuse in Relationships
379(9)
The Prevalence of Violence
379(2)
Types of Couple Violence
381(2)
Gender Differences in Partner Violence
383(2)
Correlates of Violence
385(1)
The Rationales of Violence
386(1)
Why Don't They All Leave?
387(1)
Violence in Premarital Relationships
388(1)
For Your Consideration
388(1)
Chapter Summary
388(7)
Part Five LOSING AND ENHANCING RELATIONSHIPS
The Dissolution and Loss of Relationships
395(33)
The Changing Rate of Divorce
396(7)
The Prevalence of Divorce
396(1)
U.S. Divorce Rates in Comparative Perspectives
396(1)
Why Has the Divorce Rate Increased?
397(6)
The Predictors of Divorce
403(10)
Levinger's Barrier Model
403(1)
Karney and Bradbury's Vulnerability-Stress-Adaptation Model
404(1)
Results from the PAIR Project
405(2)
Results from the Early Years of Marriage Project
407(1)
People's Personal Perceptions of the Causes of Divorce
408(2)
Specific Factors Associated with Divorce
410(3)
The Road to Divorce
413(5)
Breaking Up with Premarital Partners
413(2)
Steps to Divorce
415(3)
The Aftermath of Separation and Divorce
418(6)
Individuals' Perspectives
418(1)
Relationships between Former Partners
419(1)
Children Whose Parents Divorce
420(4)
For Your Consideration
424(1)
Chapter Summary
425(3)
Shyness and Loneliness
428(29)
Shyness
428(4)
Loneliness
432(12)
Measuring Loneliness
433(3)
How Does It Feel to Be Lonely?
436(1)
Does Loneliness Matter?
436(2)
Who's Lonely?
438(4)
Loneliness across the Lifespan
442(2)
Possible Causes and Moderators of Loneliness
444(4)
Inadequacies in Our Relationships
444(1)
Changes in What We Want from Our Relationships
445(1)
Causal Attributions
445(1)
Interpersonal Behaviors
446(2)
Coping with Loneliness
448(5)
What Helps People Feel Less Lonely?
449(4)
Loneliness as a Growth Experience
453(1)
For Your Consideration
453(1)
Chapter Summary
454(3)
Maintaining and Repairing Relationships
457
Maintaining and Enhancing Relationships
459(5)
Staying Committed
460(3)
Staying Content
463(1)
Repairing Relationships
464(13)
Do It Yourself
465(1)
Preventive Maintenance
466(2)
Marital Therapy
468(9)
In Conclusion
477(1)
For Your Consideration
477(1)
Chapter Summary
478
References 1(1)
Credits 1(1)
Name Index 1(12)
Subject Index 13


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