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Introduction to Audiologic Rehabilitation

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780205319466

ISBN10:
0205319467
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $122.33
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Summary

This much anticipated Fourth Edition is the most current text available for preparing students for work in the area of audiologic rehabilitation. This highly regarded text has been extensively updated and revised. The text begins with eight chapters introducing the fundamentalsamplification, including cochlear implants, auditory and visual stimuli, speech and language, and educational and psychosocial issues. Two comprehensive methods and procedures chapters follow, focusing on children, adults, and elderly adults. Finally, the well-documented and amply illustrated text concludes with two case study chapters.

Table of Contents

Contributors xv
Preface xvii
PART ONE: Fundamentals of Audiologic Rehabilitation 1(274)
Overview of Audiologic Rehabilitation
3(28)
Ronald L. Schow
Michael A. Nerbonne
Introduction
3(2)
Definitions and Synonyms
4(1)
Providers of Audiologic Rehabilitation
4(1)
Education Needs of Providers
5(1)
Hearing Loss Characteristics
5(6)
Degree of Hearing Impairment and Configuration
5(3)
Time of Onset
8(1)
Type of Loss
8(2)
Auditory Speech Recognition Ability
10(1)
Consequences of Hearing Loss: Primary and Secondary
11(2)
Communication Difficulties
11(1)
Variable Hearing Disability
12(1)
Rehabilitative Alternatives
13(5)
Historical Background
14(1)
Birth of Audiology
15(2)
Difficulties in Acceptance of Audiologic Rehabilitation
17(1)
Current Status
18(1)
Procedures in Audiologic Rehabilitation: An AR Model
18(6)
Rehabilitation Assessment Procedures
19(3)
Management Procedures
22(2)
Settings for Audiologic Rehabilitation
24(2)
Children
25(1)
Adults
25(1)
Elderly Adults
25(1)
Summary
26(1)
Summary Points
26(2)
Recommended Reading
28(1)
Recommended Web Site
28(1)
References
28(3)
Hearing Aids and Assistive Devices
31(50)
H. Gustav Mueller
Anne Strouse Carter
Introduction
32(1)
Hearing Aids
33(10)
Basic Components
33(1)
Controls and Features
34(3)
Hearing Aid Styles
37(1)
The Body Aid
37(2)
The Eyeglass Aid
39(1)
The BTE
40(1)
The ITE
41(1)
The ITC
42(1)
The CIC
42(1)
Summary
43(1)
Specialized Fitting Options
43(4)
CROS and BICROS
43(1)
Bone Conduction and Implantable Hearing Aids
44(1)
Traditional Bone Conduction Devices
44(1)
Implantable Hearing Aids
45(2)
The Earmold
47(3)
Acoustic Effects of Earmolds
48(1)
Low-frequency Modification
48(1)
Mid-frequency Modification
49(1)
High-frequency Modification
49(1)
The Earmold Impression
49(1)
Batteries
50(1)
Electroacoustic Properties
50(4)
The Selection and Fitting of Hearing Aids
54(12)
Selecting the Hearing Aid Candidate
54(1)
Degree of Hearing Loss
54(1)
Degree of Communication Disability
55(1)
Motivation to Use Hearing Aids
56(1)
Preselection Measurements
56(1)
Pure Tone Thresholds
57(1)
Loudness Discomfort Level (LDL)
57(1)
Loudness Contour Testing
57(1)
Hearing Aid Selection
58(1)
Hearing Aid Style
58(1)
Gain and Frequency Response
58(1)
Maximum Output
58(1)
Automatic Signal Processing (ASP)
58(1)
Programmable Hearing Aids
59(1)
Digital Signal Processing
60(1)
Binaural Fittings
60(1)
Other Considerations
60(1)
Verification
61(1)
Informal Rating of Speech Quality and Intelligibility
61(1)
Speech Recognition or Intelligibility Testing
61(1)
Loudness Scaling
62(1)
Probe Microphone Measurements
62(1)
Postfitting Counseling, Orientation, and Outcome Measures
62(1)
Postfitting Counseling and Instrument Orientation
63(2)
Follow-up Visits and Outcome Measures
65(1)
Considerations for the Pediatric Patient
66(1)
Prefitting Testing
66(1)
Fitting Considerations
66(1)
Verification of Fitting
66(1)
Postfitting Procedures
67(1)
Assistive and Alternative Rehabilitation Devices
67(10)
Personal and Group Amplification Devices
68(1)
Hardwire Systems
68(1)
Induction Loop Systems
69(2)
Infrared Systems
71(1)
FM Systems
71(4)
Television Amplification Devices
75(1)
Telephone Devices
75(1)
Signaling Devices
76(1)
Other Alternative Devices for the Deaf
76(1)
Summary Points
77(1)
Recommended Reading
78(1)
References
78(3)
Cochlear Implants and Other Rehabilitative Areas
81(20)
Alice E. Holmes
Introduction
81(1)
How Does a Cochlear Implant Work?
82(1)
History of Cochlear Implants
83(1)
The Cochlear Implant Team
84(2)
Who Is a Candidate?
86(4)
Candidacy for Adults
88(1)
Candidacy for Children
89(1)
Deaf Culture and Cochlear Implants
90(1)
Treatment Plans for Cochlear Implant Recipients
90(5)
Hook-up
91(2)
Follow-up Programming and Therapy
93(2)
Variables Affecting Performance
95(1)
Future Trends in Cochlear Implants
95(1)
Auditory Brainstem Implant
95(1)
Vestibular Rehabilitation
96(1)
Tinnitus Rehabilitation
96(2)
Summary Points
98(1)
Recommended Reading
98(1)
Recommended Web Sites
98(1)
References
99(2)
Auditory Stimuli in Communication
101(38)
Michael A. Nerbonne
Ronald L. Schow
Introduction
101(1)
A Communication Model
102(1)
Auditory Perception
103(12)
Development of Auditory Skills
103(1)
Basic Perception Abilities
103(1)
Acoustics of Speech
104(1)
Intensity Parameters of Speech
105(1)
Frequency Parameters of Speech
105(3)
Temporal Parameters of Speech
108(1)
Transitional Cues
109(1)
Speech Perception and Comprehension
110(1)
Speech Perception and Hearing Loss
111(1)
Physical Properties
111(1)
Redundancy and Noise
112(3)
The Auditory Training Process
115(3)
Definition and Application of Auditory Training
115(1)
Early Efforts in Auditory Training
116(1)
Carhart
116(2)
Current Approaches to Auditory Training
118(16)
Candidacy for Auditory Training
118(1)
Assessment of Auditory Skills
118(1)
Evaluating Children
119(2)
Evaluating Adults
121(3)
Methods of Auditory Training
124(1)
Erber
124(3)
DASL II
127(1)
SKI-HI
128(1)
SPICE
129(2)
Consonant Recognition Training
131(1)
Communication Training and Therapy
131(3)
Summary Points
134(1)
Recommended Reading
134(1)
References
135(4)
Visual Stimuli in Communication
139(44)
Nicholas M. Hipskind
Introduction
139(1)
Factors Related to Speechreading
140(11)
Speaker
141(1)
Signal and Code
142(1)
Visemes
143(2)
Visibility
145(2)
Environment
147(1)
Speechreader
148(1)
Age
148(1)
Gender
148(1)
Intelligence
149(1)
Personality Traits
149(1)
Visual Skills
149(1)
Visual Acuity
149(1)
Visual Perception
150(1)
Hearing
151(1)
Speechreading and the Hearing Impaired
151(11)
Assessment of Speechreading Ability
151(1)
Formal Speechreading Tests
152(1)
Informal Speechreading Tests
152(2)
Visual Assessment and Speechreading Evaluation
154(1)
Hearing Impairment and Dependence on Vision
154(1)
Deaf
154(1)
Hard of Hearing
155(1)
Traditional Speechreading Methods
155(1)
Analytic and Synthetic Approaches
156(1)
Recent Trends in Speechreading Instruction
156(1)
Children
157(3)
Adults
160(1)
Innovative Options
161(1)
Manual Communication
162(6)
Types of Manual Communication
162(3)
Signed English Systems
165(1)
Fingerspelling
166(1)
Cued Speech
166(2)
Summary Points
168(1)
Recommended Reading
169(1)
References
169(5)
Appendixes
174(9)
Language and Speech of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
183(42)
Deborah N. Seyfried Culbertson
Patricia B. Kricos
Introduction
183(1)
Language and Communication
184(16)
Factors Affecting Language Acquisition
184(1)
Language Characteristics of Preschool Children with Hearing Impairment
185(1)
Importance of Parent-Child Interactions
185(3)
Knowledge of Schema in Preschool Children
188(1)
Semantic and Pragmatic Functions in Preschool Children
188(1)
Early Vocabulary in Preschool Children
189(1)
Language Characteristics of School-Age Children with Hearing Impairment
190(1)
Lexical-Semantic Skills of School-age Children
190(1)
Syntactic-Morphologic Skills of School-age Children
190(1)
Pragmatic Skills of School-age Children
191(1)
Plateau in Language Acquisition for School-age Children
191(1)
Preliteracy and Literacy Issues
192(1)
Language Assessment
192(1)
Limitations and Cautions in Using Formal Language Measures
193(1)
Essential Conditions for Evaluating Language Abilities
193(2)
Communication and Language Management for Preschool and School-Age Children with Hearing Impairment
195(2)
Strategies for Developing Conversational Skills
197(1)
Preliteracy and Literacy Activities
198(1)
Bilingual Education for Children Who Are Deaf
199(1)
Speech Characteristics, Assessment, and Management
200(16)
Hearing as the Foundation for Speech Sound Development
200(1)
Early Vocalizations of the Child
201(1)
Speech Intelligibility
201(3)
Speech Characteristics, Assessment, and Management for Individuals with Prelingual Hearing Loss
204(1)
Individuals with Mild to Moderately Severe Prelingual Hearing Loss
204(3)
Individuals with Prelingual Hearing Loss in the Severe to Profound Range
207(4)
Speech Assessment of Individuals with Severe or Profound Hearing Loss
211(1)
Measures of Speech Intelligibility
211(1)
Measures of Articulation and Phonology
212(1)
Perceptual Assessment of Suprasegmentals and Voice Characteristics
213(1)
Acoustic and Physiologic Displays
213(1)
Speech Management for Individuals with Severe or Profound Hearing Loss
213(3)
Speech Characteristics of Individuals with Postlingual Profound Hearing Loss
216(1)
Summary
216(1)
Summary Points
217(1)
Recommended Reading
217(1)
Recommended Web Sites
218(1)
References
218(7)
Psychosocial Aspects of Hearing Impairment and Counseling Basics
225(22)
Kris English
Introduction
225(1)
Psychosocial Aspects of Hearing Impairment
226(11)
Growing Up with Hearing Loss
226(1)
Self-concept
226(1)
Emotional Development
227(1)
Family Concerns
228(2)
Social Competence
230(1)
Special Issues in Adolescence
231(1)
Summary
231(1)
Acquiring Hearing Loss
232(1)
Self-concept
232(1)
Psychoemotional Reactions
233(1)
Family Concerns
233(1)
Social Concerns
234(1)
Summary
234(1)
About Being Deaf
234(1)
Being Deafened
235(1)
``Deafness with a Capital D''
236(1)
``Knowing Is Not Enough'': Counseling Basics
237(5)
Important Distinctions
237(1)
What We May Think Counseling Is
238(1)
What Counselors Say Counseling Is
239(1)
The Counseling Process
239(1)
Help Patients (or Parents) Tell Their Story
240(1)
Help Patients Clarify Their Problems
240(1)
Help Patients Take Responsibility for Their Listening Problems
241(1)
When to Refer
242(1)
Summary
242(1)
Summary Points
243(1)
Recommended Reading
243(1)
Recommended Web Sites
244(1)
References
244(3)
Audiologic Rehabilitation Services in the School Setting
247(28)
Kris English
Introduction
247(1)
Why AR Services Are Required in School Settings: The Educational Consequences of Hearing Impairment
248(9)
Degree of Loss: Terminology
248(2)
Mandated by Law
250(1)
Key Components of IDEA
251(1)
Least Restrictive Environment
251(1)
Educational Options
252(2)
LRE for a Child with HI
254(1)
The Individualized Education Program
255(1)
The Communication Debate
255(1)
Oral-Aural Approach
256(1)
Total Communication
256(1)
Cued Speech
257(1)
Using Sign Only
257(1)
AR Services Provided in Schools
257(9)
Screening and Assessment
258(1)
Management of Amplification
259(1)
Direct Instruction and Indirect Consultation
259(1)
Hearing Conservation
260(1)
Evaluation and Modification of Classroom Acoustics
260(3)
Transition Planning to Postsecondary Placements
263(1)
How Services Are Provided
263(3)
AR Service Providers in School Settings
266(1)
Teachers
266(1)
Audiologists
266(1)
Speech-Language Pathologists
267(1)
Related Support Personnel
267(1)
Services for Children with Auditory Processing Problems
267(3)
Summary Points
270(1)
Recommended Reading
271(1)
Recommended Resources
271(1)
Software
271(1)
Web Sites
272(1)
References
272(3)
PART TWO: Comprehensive Approaches to Audiologic Rehabilitation 275(128)
Audiologic Rehabilitation for Children: Assessment and Management
276(59)
Mary Pat Moeller
Ronald L. Schow
Dorothy Johnson
Introduction
277(1)
Prevalence of Loss and Level of Service
278(1)
Terms and Definitions
278(1)
Profile of the Client
279(1)
Hearing Loss
279(1)
Age
280(1)
Other Disabling Conditions
280(1)
Rehabilitation Settings and Providers
280(2)
Identification and Assessment Procedures with Children
282(3)
Early Identification
282(1)
School Screening
283(1)
Medical and Audiologic Assessment
283(2)
Aspects of Audiologic Rehabilitation: Early Intervention for Parent-Infant and Preschool
285(28)
Rehabilitation Assessment
285(1)
Management
285(1)
Environmental Coordination and Participation
285(8)
Audibility, Amplification, and Assistive Device Issues
293(3)
Remediation of Communication Rehabilitation Activity
296(12)
Counseling and Psychosocial Aspects
308(5)
Aspects of Audiologic Rehabilitation: School Years
313(11)
Rehabilitation Assessment: IEP Meeting
313(1)
Management
314(1)
Environmental Coordination and Participation
314(1)
Audibility, Amplification, and Assistive Device Issues
315(5)
Communication and Language Stimulation: School-age Level
320(3)
Counseling and Psychosocial Aspects (Special Case)
323(1)
Summary
324(2)
Summary Points
326(1)
Recommended Reading
327(1)
Recommended Web Sites
327(1)
References
327(5)
Appendix
332(3)
Audiologic Rehabilitation for Adults and Elderly Adults: Assessment and Management
335(68)
Kathy Pichora-Fuller
Ronald L. Schow
Introduction
336(1)
Profile of the Adult Client
336(1)
Hearing Loss over the Life-span
336(1)
Profile of the Elderly Client
337(3)
Physical and Mental Health and the Aging Process
338(1)
Hearing Loss
338(1)
Presbycusis
338(1)
Phonemic Regression
339(1)
Economic Status and Retirement
339(1)
Living Environments
339(1)
Model for Rehabilitation
340(3)
Assessment
340(2)
Treatment
342(1)
Rehabilitation Settings
343(5)
University Programs
343(3)
Community Centers and Agencies
346(1)
Military
347(1)
Consumer Groups
347(1)
Hospitals, Medical Offices, Private Practice Audiologists, and Hearing Instrument Specialists
347(1)
Rehabilitation Assessment
348(7)
Audiologic Testing
348(1)
Assessment by Self-report
349(1)
Case History
349(1)
Other Forms of Self-report
349(1)
Outcome Measures
350(4)
Core Assessment Overview
354(1)
Rehabilitation Management
355(40)
Issues and Imperatives in Audiologic Management of Adults
356(5)
Counseling and Psychosocial Considerations
361(9)
Amplification and Instrumental Interventions to Achieve Audibility
370(1)
Is the Client Ready for an Instrument?
370(1)
Fit and Function of the Instrument
371(8)
Counseling and Orientation to Instruments
379(5)
Remediation of Communication Activities
384(5)
Environmental Coordination and Participation Improvement
389(3)
Further Illustration of CORE and CARE
392(3)
Summary
395(1)
Summary Points
395(1)
Recommended Reading
396(1)
Recommended Web Sites
396(1)
References
397(6)
PART THREE: Implementing Audiologic Rehabilitation: Case Studies 403(56)
Case Studies: Children
405(30)
Mary Pat Moeller
Introduction
405(2)
Joey: Family-centered Intervention: Multiple Disabilities
407(4)
Background Information
407(1)
Previous Rehabilitation
407(3)
Environmental Coordination and Participation
410(1)
Communication Rehabilitation Adjustment
410(1)
Psychosocial and Counseling Aspects
411(1)
Mike: Decision Making by a Student Related to Cochlear Implants
411(4)
Background Information
412(1)
Aural Rehabilitation Plan: Pre-implant
412(1)
Aural Rehabilitation Plan: Post-implant
413(1)
Intervention Outcomes
414(1)
Summary
415(1)
Amber: Issues Affecting Educational Placement
415(5)
Background Information
415(1)
Assessment Findings
416(3)
Recommendations for Management
419(1)
Follow-up Assessment
420(1)
Greg: Late Identification of a Hard-of-Hearing Child
420(7)
Background Information
420(1)
Communication Activity Assessment
421(4)
Management
425(1)
Remediation of Communication Activity: Auditory and Linguistic Training
425(1)
Intervention Outcomes
426(1)
Summary
427(1)
Steve: Diagnostic Therapy: A Tool for Solving Complex Intervention Problems
427(5)
Background Information: Assessment of Hearing Loss and Amplification
428(1)
Previous Rehabilitation
428(1)
Differential Diagnosis and Assessment: Communication Problems and Signing Strategies
428(1)
Motoric Limitations in Signing
429(1)
Related Personal Factors
430(1)
Management: Sign Communication Rehabilitation
430(1)
Outcome Measures
431(1)
Summary
432(1)
References and Recommended Reading
432(1)
Recommended Web Site
433(2)
Case Studies: Adults and Elderly Adults
435(24)
Michael A. Nerbonne
Jeff E. Brockett
Dan F. Konkle
Alice E. Holmes
Introduction
435(1)
Dr. M.: Progressive Hearing Loss
436(4)
Case History
436(1)
Audiologic Rehabilitation Assessment
437(1)
Management
438(1)
Hearing Aid Evaluation and Adjustment
438(1)
Communication Training
439(1)
Summary
439(1)
Mr. B.: Hearing Loss, Depression, and Successful Hearing Aid Use
440(5)
Informational Counseling
440(1)
Rehabilitation Assessment
440(1)
Communication Status: Impairment Activity Limitations
440(1)
Overall Participation Variables
440(1)
Related Personal Factors
441(1)
Environmental Factors
441(1)
Rehabilitation Management
441(1)
Counseling and Psychosocial Issues
441(1)
Audibility and Impairment Management
442(1)
Remediate Communication Activity
443(1)
Environment and Coordination: Participation Improvement
444(1)
Summary
444(1)
Dr. F.: Meniere's Disease
445(6)
Case History
445(2)
Audiologic Rehabilitation Assessment and Management
447(1)
Initial Experiences with Amplification
447(2)
Subsequent Experiences with Amplification
449(1)
Summary
450(1)
Mrs. O.: Cochlear Implant User
451(4)
Case History
451(1)
Diagnostic Information
451(2)
Pre-CI Management
453(1)
Counseling and Psychosocial Considerations
453(1)
Communication Remediation
453(1)
CI Surgery
453(1)
Post-CI Management
453(1)
Audibility and Amplification
453(1)
Audiovisual Training for Communication
453(1)
Counseling and Coordination
454(1)
Summary
455(1)
Mrs. E.: Nursing Home Hearing Aid User
455(2)
Case History
455(1)
Diagnostic Information
455(1)
Audiologic Rehabilitation
456(1)
Summary
457(1)
Summary Points
457(1)
References
458(1)
Author Index 459(4)
Subject Index 463


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