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Introduction to Design,9780131841062
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Introduction to Design

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780131841062

ISBN10:
0131841068
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $94.00
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  • Introduction to Design
    Introduction to Design




Summary

From the author of Production for Graphic Designers 3e, this book provides an engaging introduction to the fundamentals of art and design. With a wide range of illustrations, Alan Pipes demonstrates in Part 1 (Elements) how an artist or designer fills a blank canvas, nothingness, with points, lines, shapes, textures, and colors in order to create a sense of space, time, and motion. Part 2 (Rules) reveals how to develop unity and harmony, balance, scale, and proportion, contrast and emphasis, and rhythm-all in the quest for a satisfying illusion. In addition, the author demonstrates his formidable knowledge of computer-aided art and design, supplementing it with his own color or black-white diagrams. This book is ideal for students embarking on courses in graphic design, fine art, and illustration-as well as allied courses in interior design, fashion design, textile design, industrial design, product design, and printmaking.

Table of Contents

Preface 8(5)
Part 1 ELEMENTS
13(160)
Prologue Nothingness
14(3)
Points and Lines
17(24)
Introduction
18(4)
Points
22(2)
Types of Line
24(2)
Line Direction
26(4)
Box---De Stijl: Netherlands, 1917-1932
27(3)
Line Quality
30(2)
Lines and Outlines---Describing Shapes
32(2)
Box---Pop Art: England and America, 1950-1970s
33(1)
Contours, Wireframes, and Freeform Gesture
34(2)
Lines as Value---Cross-Hatching and Screening
36(2)
Imaginary Lines---Lost and Found Edges
38(3)
Box---Cubism: France, 1907-1914
39(1)
Exercises
39(2)
Shape
41(20)
Introduction
42(6)
Geometric and Rectilinear Shapes
48(2)
Curvilinear and Biomorphic Shapes
50(2)
Box---Art Nouveau: France, Worldwide 1890-1914
51(1)
Abstract and Non-representational Shapes
52(2)
Positive and Negative Shapes
54(2)
Distortion and Idealism
56(5)
Box---The Renaissance: Italy, 14th to 16th Century
57(2)
Exercises
59(2)
Texture
61(18)
Introduction
62(4)
Tactile Texture
66(2)
Collage
68(4)
Box---Dada: Germany and Paris, 1916-1922
70(2)
Visual Texture
72(2)
Trompe L'oeil
74(2)
Pattern
76(3)
Exercises
77(2)
Space---Creating the Illusion of Depth
79(32)
Introduction
80(6)
Space---Shallow and Deep
86(2)
Size Cues
88(2)
Linear Perspective
90(4)
One-point perspective
94(2)
Two-point perspective
96(2)
Three-point perspective
98(2)
Amplified and Aerial Perspective
100(2)
Metric Projections
102(4)
Open and Closed Compositions
106(2)
Spatial Confusion
108(3)
Exercises
109(2)
Time and Motion
111(14)
Introduction
112(4)
Anticipated Motion
116(2)
Repeated Figures
118(2)
Multiple Images
120(2)
Box---Futurism: Italy, 1909-1916
120(2)
Motion Blur
122(3)
Box---Abstract Expressionism: America, 1940s-1960s
123(1)
Exercises
123(2)
Value
125(18)
Introduction
126(6)
Patterns of Value
132(2)
Chiaroscuro---Light and Shade
134(4)
Digital Shading and Lighting
138(5)
Exercises
141(2)
Color
143(30)
Introduction
144(4)
Box---Impressionism: France, 1867-1886
147(1)
What Is Color?
148(2)
Color Characteristics
150(2)
Color Theory---Wheels, Triangles, and Trees
152(2)
Box---Bauhaus: Germany, 1919-1933
152(2)
Color Through the Ages
154(4)
Color Printing, Computers, and the Web
158(2)
Color Interactions
160(2)
Color Schemes
162(4)
Using Color
166(4)
Warm and cool
167(1)
Emphasis
167(1)
Visual balance
168(1)
Space and depth
168(1)
Value
169(1)
Box---Fauvism: France, 1905-1908
169(1)
The Meaning of Color
170(3)
Exercises
171(2)
Part 2 RULES
173(81)
Unity and Harmony
175(16)
Introduction
176(4)
Thematic Unity
180(2)
Gestalt and Visual Unity
182(2)
The Grid
184(2)
Achieving Unity
186(5)
Exercises
189(2)
Balance
191(20)
Introduction
192(4)
Formal and Informal Balance
196(2)
Symmetrical and Asymmetrical Balance
198(2)
Balance by Shape and Texture
200(2)
Balance by Position and Eye Direction
202(2)
Radial Balance
204(2)
Balance by Value and Color
206(2)
Crystallographic Balance
208(3)
Exercises
209(2)
Scale and Proportion
211(16)
Introduction
212(4)
Human Scale
216(4)
Contrast and Confusion
220(2)
Ideal Proportion
222(5)
Exercises
225(2)
Contrast and Emphasis
227(16)
Introduction
228(4)
Contrast
232(2)
Isolation
234(2)
Placement
236(2)
Absence of Focal Point
238(5)
Exercises
241(2)
Rhythm
243(11)
Introduction
244(4)
Rhythm and Motion
248(2)
Alternating and Progressive Rhythm
250(2)
Rhythmic Sensation
252(2)
Exercises
253(1)
Glossary 254(8)
Bibliography 262(2)
Web Resources 264(1)
Picture Credits 265(2)
Index 267

Excerpts

"Reason informed by emotion... expressed in beauty... elevated by earnestness... lightened by humor... that is the ideal that should guide all artists." - CHARLES RENNIE MACKINTOSH What is art? Art is what artists do, Dadaist Marcel Duchamp might have said. Art is what you can get away with, you may be tempted to think when looking at contemporary artworks. The word art derives from Sanskrit and means "making" or "creating something". We can only guess why our earliest ancestors started to make art, drawing and carving on cave walls. Egyptian wall paintings and African art have a ritual dimension, but still manage to delight our eyes. The ancient Greeks and Romans surrounded their lives with culture: poetry, theater, sculptures-and paintings, few of which survive. They were probably the first artists who painted purely for pleasure and for the joy their art gave others. Whatever the reasons for creating, art enriches our lives, stimulates our senses, or simply makes us think. Artists have come to be revered for their gift of profound insight into the human condition. In Byzantine and Renaissance times, being an artist was just a job: painters had workshops full of assistants, and artisans making paint and preparing panels and canvases. They generally produced religious artworks for wealthy patrons. It was only in the late nineteenth century that "art for art's sake" began to emerge, art being seen as an expression of the artist's emotions. Since then Hollywood has depicted such artists as Vincent van Gogh and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec as glamorous yet tortured visionaries who suffered for their art, locked away in solitary garrets. Abstract art followed, and today almost anything goes. What is design? Its roots are found in the Italian word disegnare, to create. In these days of designer jeans and kitchens, it is easy to think of design equating to stylish consumer goods or gadgets, made desirable by clever and knowing graphics (which draw ultimately on art for inspiration). We can forget that everything artificial--good or bad--has been designed by someone. In its broadest sense, design is preparing for action: planning and organizing. We might have "designs" on someone, and plan how we can engineer a successful outcome. Architects design buildings, industrial designers design products, and artists design paintings and sculptures. This book looks at design in the easel-based arts, with references to the allied arts of photography and sculpture. By easel arts we mean drawing, painting, and printmaking, in the sense of making marks on paper or canvas, or the screen-based arts: video, computer, and installation-based works. The computer has blurred the boundaries between the traditional creative disciplines, but they all share a need for planning and visual organization. Design can also be considered as a form of problem-solving. But unlike math, in art there is never a single correct solution. This is why artists and designers are often called "creatives." Painters and sculptors often set their own tasks; designers and illustrators are given a brief with strictly defined parameters, and attempt a design based on those constraints. Even in abstract expressionism, where you might imagine that all the artist does is throw a pot of paint at the canvas and hope for the best, there are underlying processes at work. The artist's eye and hand in tandem are guided by a need to produce an outcome, and he or she is informed by the whole history of art up until that point. Chance and randomness do have a place, but serendipity is a better term: you need skill and experience to turn a happy accident to your advantage. It is beyond the scope of this book to provide a comprehensive overview of art history, but there are plenty of other books and web resources--some of which are listed toward the end of this book, should you be inspired to explor


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