CART

(0) items

Introduction to Environmental Geology,9780131447646

Introduction to Environmental Geology

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131447646

ISBN10:
0131447645
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2008
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $151.20

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$26.28

Hurry!

Only one copy
in stock at this price.

Buy Used Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
U9780131447646
$30.14

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $6.48
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2008.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Related Products


  • Introduction to Environmental Geology
    Introduction to Environmental Geology
  • Introduction to Environmental Geology
    Introduction to Environmental Geology
  • Introduction to Environmental Geology
    Introduction to Environmental Geology




Summary

As the human population increases, many decisions concerning our use of natural resources will determine our standard of living and the quality of our environment. This reader-friendly book helps readers develop an understanding of how geology interacts with major environmental problems facing society.Focuses on five fundamental concepts of environmental geology: Human Population Growth, Sustainability, Earth as a System, Hazardous Earth Processes, and Scientific Knowledge and Values. Features new chapters on Impacts of Extraterrestrial Objects (Chapter 10) and Waste as a Resource: Waste Management (Chapter 16). Presents new or extensively revised discussion of human population growth, Alaska earthquake of 2002, emerging global water shortage, cleaning Boston Harbor, and much more. Revises many figures to more clearly illustrate the topics under discussion, based on user feedback.An informative reference for anyone interested in learning more about the environment.

Table of Contents

Preface xii
How to Use the Hazard City CD-ROM xvi
PART ONE Foundations of Environmental Geology
1(94)
Philosophy and Fundamental Concepts
2(28)
Case History: Easter Island: Are We on the Same Path at a Global Scale?
3(1)
Introduction to Environmental Geology
3(4)
A Closer Look: Earth's Place in Space
4(3)
Fundamental Concepts of Environmental Geology
7(23)
Concept One: Human Population Growth
8(5)
Concept Two: Sustainability
13(2)
Concept Three: Earth as a System
15(2)
A Closer Look: Human Landscape Modification: Ducktown, Tennessee
17(3)
Case History: The Aral Sea: The Death of a Sea
20(1)
A Closer Look: The Gaia Hypothesis
21(1)
Concept Four: Hazardous Earth Processes, Risk Assessment, and Perception
22(1)
Concept Five: Scientific Knowledge and Values
22(8)
Internal Structure of Earth and Plate Tectonics
30(28)
Case History: Two Cities on a Plate Boundary
31(1)
Internal Structure of Earth
32(2)
What We Know about the Internal Structure of Earth
34(1)
Plate Tectonics
35(8)
A Closer Look: The Wonders of Mountains
42(1)
A Detailed Look at Seafloor Spreading
43(6)
Pangaea and Present Continents
49(3)
How Plate Tectonics Works: Putting It Together
52(2)
Plate Tectonics and Environmental Geology
54(4)
Minerals and Rocks
58(37)
Case History: The Asbestos Controversy
59(1)
Minerals
60(5)
Important Rock-Forming Minerals
65(7)
A Closer Look: Weathering
67(3)
A Closer Look: Clay
70(2)
Rock Cycle
72(1)
Three Rock Laws
73(1)
Igneous Rocks
74(5)
Sedimentary Rocks
79(3)
Metamorphic Rocks
82(5)
Rock Strength and Deformation
87(2)
Case History: St. Francis Dam
87(2)
Rock Structures
89(6)
PART TWO Earth Processes and Natural Hazards
95(224)
Introduction to Natural Hazards
96(26)
Case History: Nevado Del Ruiz: A Story of People, Land Use, and Volcanic Eruption
97(1)
Hazards, Disasters, and Natural Processes
97(8)
A Closer Look: The Magnitude-Frequency Concept
104(1)
Evaluating Hazards: History, Linkages, Disaster Prediction, and Risk Assessment
105(6)
A Closer Look: Scientists, Hazards, and the Media
110(1)
The Human Response to Hazards
111(4)
Global Climate and Hazards
115(1)
Population Increase, Land-Use Change, and Natural Hazards
116(6)
Earthquakes and Related Phenomena
122(46)
Case History: Northridge, 1994
123(1)
Introduction to Earthquakes
123(1)
Earthquake Magnitude
123(4)
Earthquake Intensity
127(1)
Plate Earthquakes
128(2)
Intraplate Earthquakes
130(2)
Earthquake Processes
132(4)
Earthquake Shaking
136(10)
Earthquake Cycle
146(1)
Earthquakes Caused by Human Activity
147(2)
Effects of Earthquakes
149(5)
Earthquake Risk and Earthquake Prediction
154(3)
Toward Earthquake Prediction
157(1)
Sequence of Earthquakes in Turkey: Can One Earthquake Set Up Another?
157(1)
The Response to Earthquake Hazards
158(10)
A Closer Look: The Alaska Earthquake of 2002 and the Value of Estimating Potential Ground Rupture
159(9)
Volcanic Activity
168(34)
Case History: Mt. Unzen, 1991
169(1)
Introduction to Volcanic Hazards
170(1)
Volcanism and Volcanoes
170(2)
Volcano Types
172(4)
Volcano Origins
176(3)
Volcanic Features
179(3)
Volcanic Hazards
182(8)
Two Case Histories
190(5)
Forecasting Volcanic Activity
195(3)
Adjustment to and Perception of the Volcanic Hazard
198(4)
Rivers and Flooding
202(34)
Case History: Mississippi River Flooding, 1973 and 1993
203(1)
Rivers: Historical Use
204(3)
Streams and Rivers
207(1)
Sediment in Rivers
208(1)
River Velocity, Discharge, Erosion, and Sediment Deposition
209(2)
A Closer Look: History of a River
210(1)
Effects of Land-Use Changes
211(2)
Channel Patterns and Floodplain Formation
213(2)
Flooding
215(4)
A Closer Look: Magnitude and Frequency of Floods
218(1)
Urbanization and Flooding
219(3)
Case History: Flash Floods in Eastern Ohio
222(1)
The Nature and Extent of Flood Hazards
222(1)
Adjustments to Flood Hazards
223(8)
Perception of Flooding
231(5)
A Closer Look: The Great Britain Floods of 2000: The Argument for Floodplain Management
236(1)
Slope Processes, Landslides, and Subsidence
236(32)
Case History: Portuguese Bend, California
237(1)
Introduction to Landslides
238(1)
Slope Processes and Types of Landslides
238(4)
Slope Stability
242(7)
A Closer Look: Translation Slides Along Bedding Planes
246(3)
Human Use and Landslides
249(5)
Case History: Vaiont Dam
250(4)
Minimizing the Landslide Hazard
254(5)
Snow Avalanches
259(1)
Subsidence
260(5)
Perception of the Landslide Hazard
265(3)
Coastal Processes
268(30)
Case History: The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Controversy
269(1)
Introduction to Coastal Hazards
269(1)
Coastal Processes
270(6)
Coastal Erosion
276(4)
A Closer Look: Measuring Coastal Change
279(1)
Coastal Hazards and Engineering Structures
280(4)
Human Activity and Coastal Erosion: Some Examples
284(3)
Tropical Cyclones
287(4)
Perception of and Adjustment to Coastal Hazards
291(7)
A Closer Look: E-Lines and E-Zones
294(4)
Impact of Extraterrestrial Objects
298(21)
Case History: The Tunguska Event
299(1)
Earth's Place in Space
300(1)
Aerial Bursts and Impacts
301(7)
Mass Extinctions
308(6)
Minimizing the Impact Hazard
314(5)
A Closer Look: Near-Earth Objects
317(2)
PART THREE Resources and Pollution
319(210)
Water Resources
320(30)
Case History: Long Island, New York
321(1)
Water: A Brief Global Perspective
322(1)
Surface Water
323(3)
Groundwater
326(6)
Interactions between Surface Water and Groundwater
332(3)
Desalination
335(1)
Water Use
335(6)
Case History: The Edwards Aquifer, Texas---Water Resource In Conflict
336(5)
Water Management in the Future
341(4)
A Closer Look: Management of the Colorado River
342(3)
Water and Ecosystems
345(2)
A Closer Look: Wetlands
345(2)
Emerging Global Water Shortages
347(3)
Water Pollution
350(26)
Case History: North Carolina's Bay of Pigs
351(1)
An Overview of Water Pollution
352
Selected Water Pollutants
335(25)
Surface-Water Pollution and Treatment
360(3)
A Closer Look: Acid Mine Drainage
361(2)
Groundwater Pollution and Treatment
363(3)
Water-Quality Standards
366(2)
Wastewater Treatment
368(5)
A Closer Look: Boston Harbor--Cleaning up a National Treasure
371(2)
Federal Legislation
373(3)
Mineral Resources
376(26)
Case History: Palo Alto, California: Urban Gold and Silver
377(1)
Minerals and Human Use
377(4)
Geology of Mineral Resources
381(9)
A Closer Look: Plate Tectonics and Minerals
384(6)
Environmental Impact of Mineral Development
390(7)
A Closer Look: Mining and Itai-Itai Disease
395(2)
A Closer Look: Homestake Mine, South Dakota
397(1)
Recycling Mineral Resources
397(2)
Minerals and Sustainability
399(3)
Energy Resources
402(54)
Case History: Worry over Energy Sources Is Nothing New: Energy Shocks Past and Present
403(1)
Energy Supply and Energy Demand
403(2)
A Closer Look: Energy Units
405(1)
Fossil Fuels
405(16)
A Closer Look: Coal Sludge in the Appalachian Mountains
411(10)
Future of Oil
421(1)
Fossil Fuel and Acid Rain
422(3)
Nuclear Energy
425(13)
A Closer Look: Radioactivity
426(12)
Geothermal Energy
438(4)
Renewable Energy Sources
442(9)
Conservation, Efficiency, and Cogeneration
451(1)
Energy Policy for the Future
452(4)
Soils and Environment
456(24)
Case History: Times Beach, Missouri
457(1)
Introduction to Soils
457(1)
Soil Profiles
458(2)
Soil Properties
460(2)
Soil Fertility
462(1)
Water in Soil
462(1)
Soil Classification
463(1)
Engineering Properties of Soil
464(4)
Rates of Soil Erosion
468(1)
A Closer Look: Universal Soil Loss Equation
468(1)
Sediment Pollution
469(2)
Case History: Reduction of Sediment Pollution, Maryland
470(1)
Land Use and Environmental Problems of Soils
471(5)
Soil Pollution
476(1)
Soil Surveys and Land-Use Planning
477(3)
Waste as a Resource: Waste Management
480(22)
Case History: Legacy from Hazardous Waste
481(1)
Concepts of Waste Management: An Overview
481(2)
Materials Management
483(1)
Solid Waste Disposal
483(7)
Hazardous Waste Management
490(12)
A Closer Look: Love Canal
492(10)
Air Pollution
502(27)
Case History: The London Smog Crisis of 1952
503(1)
Introduction to Air Pollution
503(1)
Pollution of the Atmosphere
504(1)
Sources of Air Pollution
504(2)
Air Pollutants
506(6)
Urban Air Pollution
512(6)
Indoor Air Pollution
518(1)
Control of Air Pollution
518(4)
Air Quality Standards
522(2)
Cost of Controlling Air Pollution
524(5)
PART FOUR Environmental Management, Global Perspective, and Society
529(1)
Global Climate Change
530(28)
Case History: Eric the Red and Climate Change
531(1)
Global Change and Earth System Science: An Overview
531(1)
Tools for Studying Global Change
532(1)
Earth's Atmosphere and Climate Change
533(2)
Glaciers and Permafrost
535(10)
Arid Lands
545(9)
A Closer Look: Glaciers
548(1)
A Closer Look: Desertification
549(1)
A Closer Look: El Nino
550(4)
Global Warming
554
Potential Effects of Global Climate Change
522(5)
Coupling of Global Change Processes
527(31)
Geology, Society, and the Future
558(1)
Case History: China on the Edge of an Environmental Crisis
559(1)
Introduction
559(1)
Geology and Environmental Health
560(3)
A Closer Look: Lead in the Environment
560(3)
Environmental Planning: Site Selection
563(4)
A Closer Look: Radon Gas
564(3)
Environmental Impact Analysis
567(5)
Land Use and Planning
572(4)
Environmental Law
576(2)
Geology, the Environment, and the Future
578
Appendix A Minerals 1(1)
Appendix B Rocks 1(1)
Appendix C Maps and Related Topics 1(1)
Appendix D How Geologists Determine Geologic Time 1(1)
Glossary 1(1)
References 1(1)
Index 1

Excerpts

The main objective ofIntroduction to Environmental Geology,third edition, is to help equip students--particularly those who intend to take only a single science course--with an understanding of the interactions between geologic processes and society. During the first half of the twenty-first century, as the human population increases and the use of resources grows, many decisions concerning our use of those resources, such as water, soil, air, minerals energy, and space to live will determine our standard of living and the quality of our environment. Scientific knowledge combined with our values will dictate those decisions. Your charge, whether as a future leader or simply an informed citizen, is to choose paths of development that are good for people and the environment, that larger community that includes plants, animals, water, and air--in other words, the environment consisting of ecosystems that we and all living things depend upon for our well-being. Earth's dynamic and changing environment constitutes one of the most compelling and exciting areas of study. Environmental geology is the application of geologic information to the entire spectrum of interactions between people and the physical environment. During a course in environmental geology, you will develop an understanding of how geology interacts with major environmental problems facing people and society. This is the essence ofIntroduction to Environmental Geology,third edition. Our strategy with this text is to: Introduce you to the basic concepts and principles of physical and environmental geology, focusing on earth materials and processes. Provide you with sufficient information concerning natural hazards and the geologic environment so that you will be a more informed citizen. You will be better prepared to make decisions concerning where you live and how society responds to natural hazards and catastrophes such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and flooding. Help you develop an understanding of relationships between natural resources and pollution. We seek, find, and use resources and, as a result, may pollute our environment. Thus, it is important to know how we might minimize pollution problems. Help you understand the basic concepts of environmental management as they relate to the geologic environment in areas such as waste management, environmental health, global change, and environmental assessment. After finishing your course in environmental geology, you will be better prepared to make decisions concerning where you build or buy a home, what resources you choose to utilize, and appropriate environmental actions relevant to society and Earth's ecosystems from a local to a global scale. Five Fundamental Concepts To this end, this book introduces a device we call the "Fundamental Concepts of Environmental Geology." These five concepts are designed to provide a memorable, transportable framework of understanding that you can carry away from the class and use throughout life to make informed choices about your interaction with and effect upon geologic processes: Human population growth:Population growth is the number one environmental problem. As population increases, so do our effects and demands on the environment. Sustainability:Sustainability is the long-term environmental objective of providing for the future of humans and other living things who share the planet. Earth as a System:The activities of human beings can have important effects on any or all of Earth's systems, often affecting the global environment. Hazardous Earth processes, risk assessment and perception:Earth's hazardous processes have always occurred and will always occur. Human beings need to recognize the threat of hazards, assess the risk to life and property, and either avoid them o


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...