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Introduction to Foodservice,9780130489036
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Introduction to Foodservice

by ;
Edition:
11th
ISBN13:

9780130489036

ISBN10:
0130489034
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2009
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

For courses in Introduction to Foodservice Management and Introduction to Food and Beverage Service. This 10th edition of a classic text has been thoroughly revised and updated to include the latest and most relevant information in the field of foodservice management. It includes the basic principles of foodservice that can be applied to the operation of any type of foodservice. The impact of current social, economic, technological, and political factors on these operations is also included.

Table of Contents

Preface xix
PART 1 The Foundations
1(74)
The Foodservice Industry
3(48)
Early History of Foodservice Organizations
10(8)
Religious Orders
Royal and Noble Households
Development of Present-Day Foodservices
18(21)
Restaurants
Colleges and Universities
School Foodservice
Clubs and Other Social Organizations
Hospitals
Nursing Homes and Other Health Care Centers
Retirement Residences and Adult Communities
Industrial and Business Foodservice
Transportation Companies
Status of Foodservice Today
39(1)
Factors Affecting Growth
40(1)
Trends in Foodservice
41(4)
Challenges Facing the Industry
45(1)
Summary
45(6)
The Systems Approach
51(24)
Classification of Foodservices
52(1)
Foodservice Operations
53(2)
The Nature of Foodservice Management
The Systems Concept and Approach
55(5)
Types of Foodservice Systems
60(7)
Summary
67(8)
PART 2 The Fundamentals
75(116)
Food Safety and HACCP
77(38)
Foodborne Illness
79(2)
Incidence of Foodborne Illness
Costs Associated with Outbreaks of Foodborne Illness
Basic Food Microbiology
81(6)
Microorganisms Causing Foodborne Infections
Microorganisms Causing Foodborne Intoxication
Chemical Causes of Foodborne Illness
Physical Causes of Foodborne Illness
Allergens: A Growing Concern
The Role of the Food Manager
87(1)
Food Safety: An Integrated Program of HACCP and Prerequisite Programs
88(2)
Prerequisite Programs: The Foundation of an Integrated Food Safety Program
Prerequisite Programs and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)
Managing an Integrated Food Safety Program
The Food Code
90(1)
Employee Health and Personal Hygiene
91(2)
Proper Attire
Personal Hygiene Habits
Other Personal Hygiene Habits
Cuts, Abrasions, and Employee Illness
Flow of Food Through the Foodservice Operation
93(1)
Proper Food Handling
94(6)
Precautions for Safe Food Production
Time-Temperature Relationships
Temperature Measuring Devices
Potential Hazards in Food Production
100(1)
Food Safety Regulations and Standards
101(1)
Definitions
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point
102(5)
The Seven Principles of HACCP
Summary
107(8)
Cleaning, Sanitation, and Safety
115(38)
Sanitary Design of Facilities
117(2)
The Physical Plant
Equipment Design and Placement
Cleaning and Sanitation
119(5)
Principles of Cleaning
Principles of Sanitation
Dishwashing
124(9)
Kitchen Utensils
Dishes, Glassware, and Silverware
Facilities Cleaning and Maintenance
133(5)
Organization and Scheduling
Preventive Maintenance
Pest Control
Checks and Inspections
Safety
138(9)
Worker Safety
Safety Program
Customer Protection
Summary
147(6)
The Menu
153(38)
Menu Planning
154(18)
Organizational Mission and Goals
The Customer
Budget Guidelines
Production and Service Capabilities
Availability of Food
Style of Service
Types of Menus
Menu Patterns
Food Characteristics and Combinations
Menu Writing
172(6)
Timetable for Planning, Development, and Implementation
Steps in Menu Development
Menu Evaluation
Writing Menus for Modified Diets
The Printed Menu
178(1)
Menu Design and Format
Menu Marketing
Customer Satisfaction
179(6)
Surveys and Comment Cards
Frequency Ratings or Popularity Indexes
Sales Data
Summary
185(6)
PART 3 The Operational Functions
191(128)
Purchasing
193(38)
What is Purchasing?
194(2)
The Market
196(5)
Market Regulation: U.S. Food and Inspection Programs
The Buyer
201(3)
The Art of Negotiation
Ethics in Purchasing
Types of Purchasing
The Vendor
204(1)
Methods of Purchasing
205(5)
Informal or Open-Market Buying
Formal Competitive Bid Buying
Variations on Methods of Purchasing
Product Selection
210(4)
Market Forms of Foods
Food Quality
Purchasing Procedures
214(13)
Identifying Needs
Specifications
Issuing Bid Requests
Developing Purchase Orders
Tabulating and Evaluating Bids
Awarding Contracts
Legal and Regulatory Aspects of Purchasing
Summary
227(4)
Receiving, Storage, and Inventory
231(22)
Receiving
232(4)
Coordination with Other Departments
Personnel
Facilities, Equipment, and Sanitation
Scheduled Hours for Receiving
Security
The Receiving Process
Storage
236(5)
Dry Storage
Refrigerated and Freezer Storage
Inventory Records and Control
241(7)
Receiving
Storeroom Issues
Perpetual Inventory
Physical Inventory
Summary
248(5)
Production
253(36)
Food Production
255(1)
Objectives of Cooking in Food Production
Computers in Production
Recipe Formulation
256(14)
Standardized Recipes
Recipe Adjustment
Forecasting
270(4)
Reasons for Forecasting
Historical Data
Criteria for Selecting a Forecasting Method
Forecast Models
Quantities to Produce
274(1)
Production Scheduling
275(3)
Production Schedules
Production Meetings
Production Control
278(5)
Ingredient Assembly
Portion Control
Product Evaluation
283(1)
Summary
283(6)
Service
289(30)
Methods of Assembly, Delivery, and Service
290(2)
Methods---Delivery and Service as Subsystems
Assembly
292(1)
Tray Assembly
Factors Affecting Choice of Distribution Systems
292(8)
Type of Foodservice System
Kind of Foodservice Organization
Size and Physical Layout of Facility
Style of Service
Skill Level of Available Personnel
Economic Factors
Quality Standards for Food and Microbial Safety
Timing Required for Meal Service
Space Requirements or Space Available
Energy Usage
Equipment Needs
300(7)
General Classification of Delivery-Service Equipment
Equipment for Specific Uses
Styles of Service
307(7)
Self-Service
Tray Service
Wait Service
Table Settings and Serving Procedures
Portable Meals
Room Service
Customer Service
Summary
314(5)
PART 4 The Facilities
319(108)
Facilities Planning and Design
321(54)
Definitions and Goals
323(1)
Preliminary Preparation for Facility Planning
323(5)
Trends Affecting Foodservice Design
Information on Developments in Design and Equipment
Regulatory Considerations
Special Considerations for Specific Types of Foodservices
Steps in the Planning Procedure
328(16)
The Prospectus
The Planning Team
Feasibility Study
Menu Analysis
Architectural Features
Budget/Cost Relationship
Design Development
344(6)
Space Allowances and Relationships
Schematic Drawing
Work Areas
350(19)
Mechanics of Drawing
Designing by Computer
Architect's Blueprints
Specifications and Contract Documents
Bids, Contracts, Construction, and Inspection
Summary
369(6)
Equipment and Furnishings
375(34)
Factors Affecting Selection of Equipment
378(3)
The Menu
Number and Type of Patrons
Form of Food Purchased and Styles of Service
Labor Hours and Worker Abilities
Utilities
The Budget
The Floor Plan
Features of Equipment
381(17)
Design and Function
Size or Capacity
Materials
Construction
Installation, Operation, and Performance
Maintenance and Replacement
Method of Purchase
398(2)
Selection of Some Basic Items
400(4)
Cooking Equipment
Noncooking Equipment
Some New Equipment Designs
Dining Room Furnishings
404(1)
Dinnerware
Tableware
Glassware
Table Covers
Summary
405(4)
Environmental Management
409(18)
Conservation of Natural Resources
411(6)
Energy Conservation
Water Conservation
Solid Waste Management
417(5)
Source Reduction
Recycling
Incineration and Landfilling
Facility Waste Assessments
Summary
422(5)
PART 5 The Management Functions
427(198)
Organizational Design
429(32)
Theories of Management
431(4)
Classical
Human Relations
Management Science/Operations Research
Modern Management Theories
Strategic Management
435(2)
Functions of Management
437(7)
Planning
Organizing
Staffing
Directing
Coordinating
Reporting
Budgeting
Skills of Managers
444(1)
Managerial Activities and Roles
444(1)
Tools of Management
445(10)
Organization Chart
Job Description
Job Specification
Work Schedule
Scheduling of Employees
Summary
455(6)
Leadership
461(30)
Motivation
463(2)
History of Motivational Theories
Current Thinking on Motivation
Leadership
465(20)
The Traditional Leadership Role
Newer Approaches to Leadership
Types of Power and Their Use
Effective Communication
Ethics and Social Responsibility
Diversity
Functional Responsibilities and Skills Required
Supervision
Decision-Making
Change Management
Summary
485(6)
Human Resource Management
491(48)
Staffing
492(4)
Skill Standards
The Employment Process
496(4)
Recruitment
Selection
The Worker on the Job
500(25)
Personnel Records
Orientation
Training
Performance Evaluation
Promotions and Transfers
Discipline
Dismissals
Handling Grievances
Staff Conferences
Labor Policies and Legislation
Labor-Management Relations
525(3)
Legislation
Summary
528(11)
Performance Improvement
539(30)
What is Productivity?
541(1)
The QWL Approach
542(22)
Work Design
Applications of Performance Improvement
Quality Management Approaches to Productivity
Summary
564(5)
Accounting Procedures
569(34)
Financial Planning
570(8)
Budgets
Steps in Budget Planning
Financial Operations: A System of Records and Reports
578(4)
Records for Control
Financial Accountability
582(18)
Reports
Factors Affecting Cost Control: Evaluation of Operations
Summary
600(3)
Marketing
603(22)
The Definition of Marketing
604(2)
The Marketing Cycle
606(1)
The Marketing Mix
607(1)
Marketing for Foodservice Operations
608(1)
Unique Aspects of Foodservice Marketing
Product
Customer Contact
Perishability
Distribution
Marketing as a Managerial Function
609(3)
Planning
Implementation
Evaluation
Merchandising and Sales Promotion in Foodservice Operations
612(2)
Merchandising
Sales Promotion
Promotion Planning
Branding
614(8)
Summary
622(3)
Appendix A Principles of Basic Cooking 625(10)
Appendix B Foodservice Equipment 635(44)
Glossary 679(10)
Index 689

Excerpts

Since the first edition ofWest and Wood's Introduction to Foodservice(then titledFoodservice in Institutions) was published in 1938, the authors have been committed to presenting the basic principles of foodservice management, which can be applied to all types of foodservice organizations. This tenth edition is no exception in giving comprehensive coverage ofallaspects of foodservice management. Earlier editions, however, reflected the distinct difference that existed between commercial or profit-seeking organizations and noncommercial or institutional not-for-profit foodservice operations. Special emphasis was given to institutional foodservices: schools and colleges, hospitals and healthcare facilities, and in-plant or industrial foodservices. In recent years, a philosophical change has taken place--first gradually, then dramatically--in the management of many not-for-profit institutional foodservices. With rising healthcare costs of recent years and the pressures of healthcare reform, for example, hospitals have become more financially competitive in order to succeed and remain in business. Schools, too, are under pressure to implement self-sustaining Child Nutrition Programs by offering revenue-generating options such as a la carte lines and catering services. Today, most foodservices strive for some margin of profit, and make less of a distinction between the two types of foodservice. In response to these changes, the title of this book was changed with the seventh edition toIntroduction to Foodservice. While the focus is on basic principles, this edition also reflects the impact of current social, economic, technological, and political factors on foodservice operations. Examples and illustrations reflect both noncommercial and commercial applications. FEATURES The pedagogical features included in this edition will help students, faculty members, and other users maximize the value of this text and foster more positive learning outcomes by providing several methods of applying the theory and content of each chapter. Of particular interest are the following: A case study runs throughout the entire book and allows students to apply the concepts presented through critical thinking questions. The discussion of the systems model has been expanded in Chapter 2 and is then re-introduced at the end of each chapter. Each chapter concludes with a "Summary" and "References" (both hard copy and Web based). "Review Questions" at the end of each chapter help pinpoint the important concepts of the subject matter and serve as a study review and test for the reader, ensuring that the more important information is learned. "Critical Thinking Questions" at the end of each chapter challenge the student to think conceptually in applying the chapter concepts to real-world situations. Appendices on "Cooking Methods" and "Foodservice Equipment" serve as references for the reader who seeks additional, detailed information. A running glossary imbedded in chapter margins defines and more clearly explains some of the key terms unique to this field of study. In the text, these terms are shown in boldface type. It is expected that users of this text will also supplement their reading with current journals, trade magazines, and research reports, as well as attend seminars and exhibits at conventions and trade shows to keep themselves up-to-date. Throughout this edition the material has been updated and revised to reflect current trends and practices. For example, branding and the branded concept as a marketing strategy are thoroughly discussed in Chapter 18. Many new photographs and illustrations are included to help visually interpret the subject matter. In addition, some chapter titles now incorporate new terminology to better reflect the subject matter. ORGANIZATION OF THIS EDITION Although


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