CART

(0) items

Introduction to Logic,9780130749215
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Introduction to Logic

by ;
Edition:
11th
ISBN13:

9780130749215

ISBN10:
0130749214
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
6/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div

Related Products


  • INTRO TO LOGIC & ELOGIC EXERCISES CD PKG, 12/e
    INTRO TO LOGIC & ELOGIC EXERCISES CD PKG, 12/e
  • Introduction to Logic
    Introduction to Logic
  • Introduction to Logic
    Introduction to Logic
  • Introduction to Logic
    Introduction to Logic
  • Introduction to Logic
    Introduction to Logic
  • Introduction to Logic
    Introduction to Logic
  • MyLogicLab Pegasus Student Access Code Card for Introduction to Logic (standalone)
    MyLogicLab Pegasus Student Access Code Card for Introduction to Logic (standalone)





Summary

THE CONTENTS OF THIS PACKAGE INCLUDES:

  • 0130337358 > INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC
  • 0130337455 > ELOGIC TUT STD ACC INTRO

Table of Contents

Foreword xiii
Preface to the Eleventh Edition xv
Acknowledgments xix
Walk-through of eLogic Online Tutorial xxii
PART ONE Logic and Language
1(178)
Basic Logical Concepts
3(68)
What Logic Is
3(1)
Propositions and Sentences
4(2)
Arguments, Premisses, and Conclusions
6(5)
Exercises
8(3)
Analyzing Arguments
11(10)
Paraphrasing
12(1)
Diagramming
13(2)
Interwoven Arguments
15(3)
Exercises
18(3)
Recognizing Arguments
21(14)
Conclusion- and Premiss-indicators
21(1)
Arguments in Context
22(2)
Premisses Not in Declarative Form
24(2)
Unstated Propositions
26(2)
Exercises
28(7)
Arguments and Explanations
35(7)
Exercises
37(5)
Deduction and Validity
42(1)
Induction and Probability
43(3)
Validity and Truth
46(4)
Complex Argumentative Passages
50(8)
Exercises
54(4)
Reasoning
58(13)
Exercises
64(3)
Challenge to the Reader
67(1)
Summary of Chapter 1
68(3)
The Uses of Language
71(28)
Three Basic Functions of Language
71(3)
Discourse Serving Multiple Functions
74(2)
The Forms of Discourse
76(10)
Exercises
80(6)
Emotive Words
86(2)
Exercise
88(1)
Kinds of Agreement and Disagreement
88(7)
Exercises
91(4)
Emotively Neutral Language
95(4)
Exercise
97(1)
Summary of Chapter 2
97(2)
Definition
99(38)
Disputes, Verbal Disputes, and Definitions
99(3)
Exercise
102(1)
Kinds of Definition and the Resolution of Disputes
102(12)
Stipulative Definitions
103(2)
Lexical Definitions
105(1)
Precising Definitions
106(3)
Theoretical Definitions
109(1)
Persuasive Definitions
110(1)
Exercises
111(3)
Extension and Intension
114(4)
Exercises
117(1)
Extensional Definitions
118(2)
Exercises
120(1)
Intensional Definitions
120(5)
Exercises
124(1)
Rules for Definition by Genus and Difference
125(12)
Exercises
129(5)
Summary of Chapter 3
134(3)
Fallacies
137(42)
What Is a Fallacy?
137(2)
Fallacies of Relevance
139(17)
The Argument from Ignorance: Argument Ad Ignorantiam
139(2)
The Appeal to Inappropriate Authority: Argument Ad Verecundiam
141(2)
Argument Ad Hominem
143(1)
Argument Ad Hominem, Abusive
143(1)
Argument Ad Hominem, Circumstantial
144(1)
The Appeal to Emotion: Argument Ad Populum
145(2)
The Appeal to Pity: Argument Ad Misericordiam
147(1)
The Appeal to Force: Argument Ad Baculum
148(1)
Irrelevant Conclusion: Ignoratio Elenchi
149(1)
Exercises
150(6)
Fallacies of Presumption
156(7)
Complex Question
156(2)
False Cause
158(1)
Begging the Question: Petitio Principii
159(1)
Accident and Converse Accident
160(1)
Exercises
161(2)
Fallacies of Ambiguity
163(16)
Equivocation
163(2)
Amphiboly
165(1)
Accent
165(2)
Composition
167(1)
Division
168(3)
Exercises
171(6)
Summary of Chapter 4
177(2)
PART TWO Deduction
179(242)
Categorical Propositions
181(36)
The Theory of Deduction
181(1)
Categorical Propositions and Classes
182(3)
Exercises
184(1)
Quality, Quantity, and Distribution
185(3)
Quality
185(1)
Quantity
185(1)
General Schema of Standard-Form Categorical Propositions
186(1)
Distribution
186(2)
Exercises
188(1)
The Traditional Square of Opposition
188(5)
Contradictories
189(1)
Contraries
189(1)
Subcontraries
190(1)
Subalternation
190(1)
The Square of Opposition
191(2)
Exercises
193(1)
Further Immediate Inferences
193(9)
Conversion
193(2)
Obversion
195(2)
Contraposition
197(3)
Exercises
200(2)
Existential Import and the Interpretation of Categorical Propositions
202(6)
Exercises
207(1)
Symbolism and Diagrams for Categorical Propositions
208(9)
Exercises
213(1)
Summary of Chapter 5
214(3)
Categorical Syllogisms
217(32)
Standard-Form Categorical Syllogisms
217(4)
Major, Minor, and Middle Terms
217(1)
Mood
218(1)
Figure
218(2)
Exercises
220(1)
The Formal Nature of Syllogistic Argument
221(3)
Exercises
223(1)
Venn Diagram Technique for Testing Syllogisms
224(8)
Exercises
230(2)
Syllogistic Rules and Syllogistic Fallacies
232(4)
Exposition of the 15 Valid Forms of the Categorical Syllogism
236(6)
Exercises
239(3)
Deduction of the 15 Valid Forms of the Categorical Syllogism
242(7)
Exercises
245(1)
Summary of Chapter 6
246(3)
Arguments in Ordinary Language
249(50)
Syllogistic Arguments in Ordinary Language
249(1)
Reducing the Number of Terms in a Syllogistic Argument
250(3)
Exercises
252(1)
Translating Categorical Propositions into Standard Form
253(8)
Exercises
260(1)
Uniform Translation
261(8)
Exercises
263(6)
Enthymemes
269(6)
Exercises
272(3)
Sorites
275(4)
Exercises
277(2)
Disjunctive and Hypothetical Syllogisms
279(8)
Exercises
282(5)
The Dilemma
287(12)
Exercises
291(5)
Summary of Chapter 7
296(3)
Symbolic Logic
299(50)
The Symbolic Language of Modern Logic
299(1)
The Symbols for Conjunction, Negation, and Disjunction
300(12)
Conjunction
301(2)
Negation
303(1)
Disjunction
304(2)
Punctuation
306(3)
Exercises
309(3)
Conditional Statements and Material Implication
312(9)
Exercises
319(2)
Argument Forms and Arguments
321(14)
Refutation by Logical Analogy
321(3)
Testing Arguments on Truth Tables
324(2)
Some Common Valid Argument Forms
326(1)
Disjunctive Syllogism
326(1)
Modus Ponens
327(1)
Modus Tollens
328(1)
Hypothetical Syllogism
328(2)
Some Common Invalid Argument Forms
330(1)
Substitution Instances and Specific Forms
330(1)
Exercises
331(4)
Statement Forms and Material Equivalence
335(5)
Statement Forms and Statements
335(1)
Tautologous, Contradictory, and Contingent Statement Forms
335(2)
Material Equivalence
337(1)
Arguments, Conditional Statements, and Tautologies
338(1)
Exercises
339(1)
Logical Equivalence
340(3)
The Paradoxes of Material Implication
343(1)
The Three ``Laws of Thought''
344(5)
Summary of Chapter 8
346(3)
The Method of Deduction
349(36)
Formal Proof of Validity
349(10)
Exercises
352(7)
The Rule of Replacement
359(13)
Exercises
364(8)
Proof of Invalidity
372(3)
Exercises
374(1)
Inconsistency
375(10)
Exercises
378(4)
Summary of Chapter 9
382(3)
Quantification Theory
385(36)
Singular Propositions
385(2)
Quantification
387(4)
Traditional Subject-Predicate Propositions
391(7)
Exercises
396(2)
Proving Validity
398(8)
Exercises
404(2)
Proving Invalidity
406(5)
Exercises
409(2)
Asyllogistic Inference
411(10)
Exercises
414(5)
Summary of Chapter 10
419(2)
PART THREE Induction
421(139)
Analogy and Probable Inference
423(26)
Argument by Analogy
423(7)
Exercises
426(4)
Appraising Analogical Arguments
430(10)
Exercises
434(6)
Refutation by Logical Analogy
440(9)
Exercises
443(3)
Summary of Chapter 11
446(3)
Causal Connections: Mill's Methods of Experimental Inquiry
449(44)
Cause and Effect
449(6)
The Meaning of ``Cause''
449(3)
Causal Laws and the Uniformity of Nature
452(1)
Induction by Simple Enumeration
453(2)
Mill's Methods
455(25)
The Method of Agreement
456(2)
Exercises
458(2)
The Method of Difference
460(2)
Exercises
462(4)
The Joint Method of Agreement and Difference
466(1)
Exercises
467(3)
The Method of Residues
470(2)
Exercises
472(2)
The Method of Concomitant Variation
474(2)
Exercises
476(4)
Critique of Mill's Methods
480(13)
The Limitations of Mill's Methods
480(1)
The Power of Mill's Methods
481(1)
Exercises
482(9)
Summary of Chapter 12
491(2)
Science and Hypothesis
493(40)
The Values of Science
493(1)
Explanations: Scientific and Unscientific
494(2)
Evaluating Scientific Explanations
496(4)
Compatibility with Previously Well-established Hypotheses
496(1)
Predictive or Explanatory Power
497(2)
Simplicity
499(1)
Seven Stages of Scientific Investigation
500(4)
Identifying the Problem
500(1)
Devising Preliminary Hypotheses
500(1)
Collecting Additional Facts
501(1)
Formulating the Explanatory Hypothesis
501(1)
Deducing Further Consequences
502(1)
Testing the Consequences
502(1)
Applying the Theory
503(1)
Exercises
504(1)
Scientists in Action: The Pattern of Scientific Investigation
504(6)
Crucial Experiments and Ad Hoc Hypotheses
510(8)
Crucial Experiments
510(2)
Ad Hoc Hypotheses
512(6)
Classification as Hypothesis
518(15)
Exercises
522(8)
Summary of Chapter 13
530(3)
Probability
533(27)
Alternative Conceptions of Probability
533(3)
The A Priori Theory of Probability
534(1)
The Relative Frequency Theory of Probability
535(1)
The Probability Calculus
536(1)
Probability of Joint Occurrences
537(6)
Exercises
541(2)
Probability of Alternative Occurrences
543(6)
Exercises
548(1)
Challenge to the Reader
549(1)
Expected Value
549(11)
Exercises
556(2)
Challenge to the Reader
558(1)
Summary of Chapter 14
558(2)
Solutions to Selected Exercises 560(61)
Special Symbols 621(2)
Glossary / Index 623


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...