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Introduction to Materials Management,9780131128743
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Introduction to Materials Management

by ; ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780131128743

ISBN10:
0131128744
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2008
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $141.60

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This is the 6th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2008.
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Summary

For courses in Materials Management, Production and Inventory Control, and Logistics taught in business and industrial technology departments of community colleges and universities. This is the only text listed in the APICSThe Educational Society for Resource Management CPIM Exam Content Manual as the text reference for the Basics of Supply Chain Management (BSCM) CPIM certification examination. Written in a simple and user-friendly style, it covers all the basics of supply chain management and production and inventory control.

Table of Contents

Introduction to Materials Management
1(18)
Introduction
1(1)
Operating Environment
2(3)
The Supply Chain Concept
5(5)
What Is Materials Management?
10(4)
Supply Chain Metrics
14(2)
Summary
16(1)
Key Terms
16(1)
Questions
17(1)
Problems
17(2)
Production Planning System
19(29)
Introduction
19(1)
Manufacturing Planning and Control System
20(5)
Sales and Operations Planning (SOP)
25(2)
Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II)
27(1)
Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP)
28(1)
Making the Production Plan
29(12)
Summary
41(1)
Key Terms
41(1)
Questions
42(1)
Problems
43(5)
Master Scheduling
48(26)
Introduction
48(1)
Relationship to Production Plan
49(3)
Developing a Master Production Schedule
52(6)
Production Planning, Master Scheduling, and Sales
58(8)
Summary
66(1)
Key Terms
66(1)
Questions
66(1)
Problems
67(7)
Material Requirements Planning
74(46)
Introduction
74(4)
Bills of Material
78(8)
Material Requirements Planning Process
86(13)
Using the Material Requirements Plan
99(5)
Summary
104(1)
Key Terms
104(1)
Questions
105(1)
Problems
106(14)
Capacity Management
120(24)
Introduction
120(1)
Definition of Capacity
120(2)
Capacity Planning
122(1)
Capacity Requirements Planning (CRP)
123(2)
Capacity Available
125(5)
Capacity Required (Load)
130(3)
Scheduling Orders
133(3)
Making the Plan
136(1)
Summary
137(1)
Key Terms
138(1)
Questions
139(1)
Problems
139(5)
Production Activity Control
144(35)
Introduction
144(4)
Data Requirements
148(2)
Order Preparation
150(1)
Scheduling
150(7)
Load Leveling
157(1)
Scheduling Bottlenecks
158(3)
Theory of Constraints and Drum-Buffer-Rope
161(2)
Implementation
163(1)
Control
164(7)
Production Reporting
171(1)
Summary
171(1)
Key Terms
172(1)
Questions
172(1)
Problems
173(6)
Purchasing
179(20)
Introduction
179(4)
Establishing Specifications
183(2)
Functional Specification Description
185(3)
Selecting Suppliers
188(3)
Price Determination
191(2)
Impact of Material Requirements Planning on Purchasing
193(2)
Some Organizational Implications of Supply Chain Management
195(1)
Key Terms
196(1)
Questions
197(1)
Problems
197(2)
Forecasting
199(34)
Introduction
199(1)
Demand Management
200(1)
Demand Forecasting
201(1)
Characteristics of Demand
201(3)
Principles of Forecasting
204(1)
Collection and Preparation of Data
204(1)
Forecasting Techniques
205(2)
Some Important Intrinsic Techniques
207(4)
Seasonality
211(5)
Tracking the Forecast
216(7)
Summary
223(1)
Key Terms
224(1)
Questions
224(1)
Problems
224(9)
Inventory Fundamentals
233(27)
Introduction
233(1)
Aggregate Inventory Management
234(1)
Item Inventory Management
234(1)
Inventory and the Flow of Material
235(1)
Supply and Demand Patterns
236(1)
Functions of Inventories
236(2)
Objectives of Inventory Management
238(2)
Inventory Costs
240(4)
Financial Statements and Inventory
244(5)
ABC Inventory Control
249(4)
Summary
253(1)
Key Terms
254(1)
Questions
254(1)
Problems
255(5)
Order Quantities
260(20)
Introduction
260(1)
Economic-Order Quantity (EOQ)
261(6)
Variations of the EOQ Model
267(1)
Quantity Discounts
268(1)
Use of EOQ When Costs Are Not Known
269(2)
Period-Order Quantity (POQ)
271(2)
Summary
273(1)
Key Terms
273(1)
Questions
274(1)
Problems
274(6)
Independent Demand Ordering Systems
280(31)
Introduction
280(1)
Order Point System
281(2)
Determining Safety Stock
283(7)
Determining Service Levels
290(2)
Different Forecast and Lead-Time Intervals
292(2)
Determining When the Order Point Is Reached
294(2)
Periodic Review System
296(2)
Distribution Inventory
298(4)
Key Terms
302(1)
Questions
302(1)
Problems
303(8)
Physical Inventory and Warehouse Management
311(21)
Introduction
311(1)
Warehousing Management
311(7)
Physical Control and Security
318(1)
Inventory Record Accuracy
319(8)
Key Terms
327(1)
Questions
327(1)
Problems
328(4)
Physical Distribution
332(31)
Introduction
332(3)
Physical Distribution System
335(2)
Interfaces
337(1)
Transportation
338(3)
Legal Types of Carriage
341(1)
Transportation Cost Elements
342(4)
Warehousing
346(7)
Packaging
353(1)
Materials Handling
354(2)
Multi-Warehouse Systems
356(3)
Key Terms
359(1)
Questions
359(1)
Problems
360(3)
Products and Processes
363(34)
Introduction
363(1)
Need for New Products
363(2)
Product Development Principles
365(2)
Product Specification and Design
367(2)
Process Design
369(1)
Factors Influencing Process Design
370(2)
Processing Equipment
372(1)
Process Systems
373(2)
Selecting the Process
375(4)
Continuous Process Improvement (CPI)
379(12)
Key Terms
391(1)
Questions
391(2)
Problems
393(4)
Just-in-Time Manufacturing
397(32)
Introduction
397(1)
Just-in-Time Philosophy
398(1)
Waste
399(3)
Just-in-Time Environment
402(9)
Manufacturing Planning and Control in a JIT Environment
411(11)
Lean Production
422(1)
Which to Choose---MRP (ERP), Kanban, or Theory of Constraints?
423(2)
Summary
425(1)
Key Terms
426(1)
Questions
426(1)
Problems
427(2)
Total Quality Management
429(29)
What Is Quality?
429(2)
Total Quality Management (TQM)
431(4)
Quality Cost Concepts
435(1)
Variation as a Way of Life
436(4)
Process Capability
440(4)
Process Control
444(3)
Sample Inspection
447(2)
ISO 9000
449(2)
Benchmarking
451(3)
JIT, TQM, and MRP II
454(1)
Key Terms
455(1)
Questions
455(1)
Problems
456(2)
Readings 458(5)
Index 463

Excerpts

Introduction to Materials Managementis an introductory text written for students in community colleges and universities. It is used in technical programs, such as industrial engineering and manufacturing engineering; in business programs; and by those already in industry, whether or not they are working in materials management. This text has been widely adopted by colleges and universities not only in North America, but also in other parts of the world. APICS--The Educational Society for Resource Management recommends this text as the reference for certification preparation for various CPIM examinations. In addition, the text is used by production and inventory control societies in other countries, including South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, France, and Brazil, and by consultants in presenting in-house courses to their customers. Introduction to Materials Managementcovers all the basics of supply chain management, manufacturing planning and control systems, purchasing, and physical distribution. The material, examples, questions, and problems lead the student logically through the text. The writing style is simple and user-friendly--both instructors and students who have used the book attest to this. In the fifth edition, we have added content in the following areas: Supply chain metrics coverage in Chapter 1, Introduction to Materials Management. New ERP coverage in Chapter 2, Production Planning System. New "Vendor-managed inventory" and "Organizational implications of supply chain management" sections in Chapter 7, Purchasing. Production lead time/demand lead time ratio in Chapter 8, Forecasting. New "Methods of evaluating inventory" section in Chapter 9, Inventory Fundamentals. Performance metrics, Lean production, and Poke-yoke in Chapter 15, Just-in-Time Manufacturing. New "Other quality control tools" section in Chapter 16, Total Quality Management. Coverage of first in, first out (FIFO); last in, first out (LIFO); average cost; and standard cost added to Chapter 9, Inventory Fundamentals. In addition, we have modified figures in many of the end-of-chapter problems to provide adopters with a new set of problems. Also, the index has been updated to include all key terms. Features carried over from the fourth edition include: Margin icons note key concepts. Key terms listed at the end of each chapter with chapter page cross-references. Example problems within the chapters. Chapter summaries. Questions and problems at the end of each chapter. Chapter references to case studies inIntroduction to Materials Management Casebook. THE CASEBOOK For the fifth edition, we developed theIntroduction to Materials Management Casebook,authored by Arnold, Chapman, and Lloyd M. Clive. The casebook takes the student beyond the textbook problems by presenting a situation followed by related analysis questions. Most text chapters have cases associated with them, as noted in the table that follows the Table of Contents, and some cases bridge several chapters. Cases vary in level of difficulty, with the more challenging cases requiring students to think about the management issues involved in their decisions on the job. Reviewers noted that the casebook has added overall rigor to this text. APPROACH AND ORGANIZATION Materials management means different things to different people. In this textbook, materials management includes all activities in the flow of materials from the supplier to the consumer. Such activities include physical supply, operations planning and control, and physical distribution. Other terms sometimes used arebusiness logisticsandsupply chain management.Often, the emphasis in business logistics is on transportation and distribution systems with little concern for what occu


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