CART

(0) items

Introduction to the Profession of Counseling,9780130982186
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Introduction to the Profession of Counseling

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130982186

ISBN10:
0130982180
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $112.00
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.16
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Introduction to the Profession of Counseling
    Introduction to the Profession of Counseling
  • Introduction to the Profession of Counseling
    Introduction to the Profession of Counseling




Summary

For Introduction to Counseling courses in Counseling and Psychology Departments. With a strong emphasis on translating counseling theory into practice, this popular text overviews the field of counseling, including foundational counseling theories and human development theories, different types of counseling (e.g., marriage and family therapy, group counseling, substance abuse counseling, etc.), and counseling practice in different settings like schools and community agencies. Separate chapters on the history of the field, ethics, assessment, prevention, and multicultural counseling round out the coverage.

Table of Contents

Part 1 Foundations of Counseling
1(94)
The Current Scene
1(25)
What Is Professional Counseling?
2(2)
Counseling Is a Process
2(1)
Counseling Involves Both Personal and Social Growth
3(1)
Counseling Includes Outreach Services
3(1)
Who Does Professional Counseling?
4(2)
Professional Counselors and Counseling Psychologists
4(1)
Comparison of Counselors and Psychotherapists
5(1)
Other Mental Health Specialists
5(1)
Where Do Professional Counselors Work?
6(13)
School Settings
7(2)
College and University Settings
9(2)
Counseling in the Community: Traditional Services
11(4)
Counseling in the Community: Current Trends
15(4)
What New Challenges Face the Profession?
19(4)
Managed Health Care Programs
19(3)
Internet Counseling
22(1)
Summary
23(1)
Projects and Activities
24(1)
References
24(2)
A Historical Perspective
26(27)
1900--1920: The Beginnings of Counseling
26(2)
Vocational Counseling and Guidance
26(1)
College Clinics
27(1)
Community Clinics
27(1)
1920--1940: The Early Years
28(2)
Growth of the Testing Movement
28(1)
Educational Guidance in Schools
28(1)
Vocational Guidance
29(1)
College Counseling
29(1)
Child Guidance Clinics and the Beginnings of Therapy
29(1)
1940--1960: Emergence of Professional Counseling
30(4)
Origins of Counseling Psychology and Counselor Training Programs
31(1)
Development of Professional Associations
32(1)
Counseling Practice: The Struggle to Clarify and Implement the Counselor Role
33(1)
1960--1980: Growth in Professional Counseling
34(6)
Professional Associations Set Standards for School Counselors
35(1)
Counseling Centers Spread on College Campuses
36(1)
Counseling Theories Multiply in the 1960s and 1970s
37(1)
Psychological Education Emerges
38(1)
Community Counseling Emerges in the 1970s
38(2)
The 1980s: Coming of Age
40(3)
Life-Span Development Theories
40(1)
Cognitive Therapies
41(1)
Awareness of Pluralism
41(1)
Counseling in Colleges and Schools
41(1)
New Community Counseling Services
42(1)
Changing Professional Associations
42(1)
The 1990s and the New Millennium: Recent Trends in Counseling
43(5)
Pluralism and the Environment
44(1)
School Counseling
45(1)
College Counseling
45(1)
Community Counseling
46(1)
Introduction of the Internet to the Counseling Field
47(1)
Professional Issues
48(1)
Summary
48(2)
Projects and Activities
50(1)
References
50(3)
Professional, Ethical, and Legal Issues
53(26)
Components of a Profession
53(7)
Professional Associations
53(2)
Unique Counselor Role
55(1)
Counselor Training
56(2)
Counselor Credentialing: Licensing and Certification
58(2)
Ethical Codes to Protect the Client and Monitor the Profession
60(8)
Ethics Regarding the Counseling Relationship
60(2)
Clients' Rights in Counseling
62(2)
Counselors' Professional Responsibilities
64(1)
Ethical Considerations in Family and Marriage Counseling
65(1)
Ethical Issues of Managed Care
66(2)
Legal Issues
68(2)
Privileged Communication
68(1)
Child Abuse: A Requirement to Report
69(1)
Legal Duty to Warn
69(1)
Counseling Liability (Malpractice)
69(1)
Minors' Rights
70(2)
School Counseling: Free Choice, Informed Consent, and Confidentiality
70(1)
Community Counseling
71(1)
Research and Evaluation
72(1)
Ethical Concerns
72(1)
Need for Qualitative Studies
73(1)
Internet Counseling
73(2)
Summary
75(1)
Projects and Activities
76(1)
References
77(2)
The Effective Counselor
79(16)
Personal Qualities
80(4)
Multicultural Awareness
81(1)
Self-Awareness and Growth
82(1)
Avoiding Burnout
82(2)
Professional Competencies
84(7)
Knowledge About Counseling Theories and Strategies
84(1)
Interviewing Skills
85(4)
Assessment Skills
89(1)
Sound Ethical Judgment
89(1)
Professional Collaboration
90(1)
The Whole Counselor
91(1)
Internet Counseling
91(1)
Summary
92(1)
Projects and Activities
93(1)
References
93(2)
Part 2 Theories and Techniques
95(110)
Human Development Theories
95(28)
Pioneers in Human Development Theory
96(2)
Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development
96(1)
Carl Jung's Stages of Life
97(1)
Other Pioneers
98(1)
Contemporary Life-Span Development Theories
98(18)
Erik Erikson's Psychosocial Life-Span Development Theory
99(3)
Moral Development: Kohlberg and Beyond
102(2)
Adult Development Theories
104(4)
Feminist Human Development Theories
108(3)
Religious and Spiritual Development
111(3)
Emotional Intelligence: A Developmental Learning Process
114(1)
Ivey's Developmental Counseling and Therapy
115(1)
Trends: Toward an Integrated Theory of Development
116(3)
Summary
119(1)
Projects and Activities
119(1)
References
120(3)
Counseling Theories and Techniques
123(46)
The Purpose of Counseling Theory
123(1)
Psychoanalytic and Psychodynamic Theories
124(13)
Classical Psychoanalytic Theory
124(2)
Psychosocial Neo-Analytic Theories
126(3)
Contemporary Psychoanalytic and Psychodynamic Theories
129(5)
Carl Jung: Analytical Psychology
134(3)
Humanistic and Existential Theories
137(6)
Rogers's Client-Centered (Person-Centered) Theory
137(2)
Gestalt Theories
139(1)
Existential Counseling and Therapy
140(2)
Holistic and Transpersonal Counseling
142(1)
Behavioral, Cognitive, and Cognitive-Behavioral Theories
143(6)
Behavioral Theories
144(1)
Cognitive Theories
145(1)
Cognitive-Behavioral Theories
146(3)
Constructivist and Social Constructionist Theories
149(5)
Constructivism
150(3)
Social Constructionism
153(1)
Constructivist and Social Constructionist Dialogues
154(1)
Creative Therapies
154(3)
Creative and Expressive Arts Therapies
154(1)
Narrative Therapy
155(2)
Theories of Brief Counseling and Therapy
157(4)
Psychodynamic Brief Counseling and Therapy
158(1)
Cognitive and Cognitive-Behavioral Brief Counseling and Therapy
159(2)
Limitations of Brief Therapy
161(1)
Toward an Integrative Theoretical Approach
161(2)
Summary
163(1)
Projects and Activities
164(1)
References
164(5)
Assessment: Tools and Processes
169(21)
New Expectations for Counselors
170(1)
Different Ways Counselors Use Assessment
171(4)
Intake Interviewing
172(1)
Assessment During Counseling
172(2)
Career Counseling Centers
174(1)
Crisis Intervention
174(1)
Diagnostic Evaluation for Agencies
174(1)
Types of Assessment
175(11)
Nonstandardized or Qualitative Assessment Skills
175(1)
Standardized Tests and Inventories
175(8)
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
183(3)
Need for Quality Training in Assessment
186(1)
Summary
187(1)
Projects and Activities
188(1)
References
188(2)
Counseling Outreach: Prevention and Intervention
190(15)
Counselors as Consultants
191(3)
The Consultation Process
191(1)
Types of Consultations
191(3)
Psychoeducation
194(4)
Teaching Courses
194(1)
Leading Workshops and Groups
195(1)
Training Paraprofessionals
196(1)
Providing Wellness Activities
197(1)
Offering Career Education Programs
198(1)
Social Change Activities
198(1)
Crisis Intervention
199(3)
The Process of Intervention
200(1)
Suicide Intervention
200(2)
Liaison Activities
202(1)
Summary
202(1)
Projects and Activities
203(1)
References
203(2)
Part 3 The Counseling Process
205(191)
Individual Counseling
205(22)
The Counseling Setting
205(1)
Client Characteristics
206(1)
The Counseling Process
207(17)
Initial Stage: Developing a Relationship and Clarifying the Presenting Problem
207(5)
Middle Stage: Exploring More Deeply
212(7)
Last Stage: Integrating Client Changes Into Daily Life
219(2)
Termination of Counseling Sessions
221(3)
Research Studies on Counseling Outcome: Meta-Analysis
224(1)
Summary
224(1)
Projects and Activities
225(1)
References
225(2)
Family and Marriage Counseling and Therapy
227(32)
Family Systems Theories
228(12)
Object Relations Theory
229(1)
Bowen's Family Systems
230(1)
Adlerian Family Therapy
231(2)
Satir's Process Model
233(2)
Minuchin's Structural Family Therapy
235(1)
Strategic Therapy
236(2)
Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Family Counseling
238(2)
The Family Life Cycle
240(1)
Family Counseling and Therapy in Practice
241(3)
Initial Stage: Developing a Relationship and Assessing the Family Problem
241(1)
Middle Stage: Developing Emotional Awareness and Acceptance of Dysfunctional Family Patterns
242(1)
Last Stage: Learning How to Change the Family System
243(1)
Termination: Separating From Therapy
244(1)
Marriage and Couple Counseling Theories
244(2)
Changing Family and Marriage Patterns
246(2)
Dual-Career Families
246(1)
Single-Parent Families
247(1)
Remarried (Blended) Families
247(1)
Child Abuse and Neglect
248(1)
The Characteristics and Effects of Abuse
248(1)
Counseling Families in Which Abuse Has Occurred
249(1)
Trends in Family Therapy
249(5)
Community Family Therapy
250(1)
Feminist Family Therapy
250(1)
Systemic Cognitive-Developmental Therapy
251(1)
Postmodern Family Narrative Therapy
252(2)
Research in Family and Marriage Counseling and Therapy
254(1)
Summary
255(1)
Projects and Activities
255(1)
References
256(3)
Group Counseling
259(17)
Ethical Guidelines With Groups
261(1)
Group Counseling Theories
262(5)
Psychodynamic Group Counseling
263(2)
Humanistic Group Counseling
265(1)
Cognitive-Behavioral Group Counseling
266(1)
Developmental Group Counseling
267(1)
The Group Experience
267(5)
Forming a Group
267(2)
Group Stages
269(3)
Future Trends
272(1)
Summary
273(1)
Projects and Activities
273(1)
References
274(2)
Career Counseling
276(22)
Historical Perspective
277(1)
The Current Scene
278(1)
Need for Professional Training
278(1)
Trends in Career Counseling
279(1)
Theoretical Approaches to Career Counseling
279(3)
Developmental Theories
279(1)
Trait-and-Factor Approach
280(1)
Postmodern Approaches
281(1)
Career Counseling Process
282(3)
Types of Problems
283(2)
Outreach
285(1)
Special Tools in Career Counseling
285(3)
Inventories and Tests
285(1)
Occupational Information
286(1)
Technology in Career Counseling
287(1)
Counseling Programs in Business and Industry
288(4)
Employee Assistance Programs
288(2)
Employee Enhancement Programs
290(1)
Job Adjustment Counseling
291(1)
Employment Counselors
292(1)
Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling
292(2)
Case Finding and Eligibility Determination for Services
293(1)
Career Counseling
293(1)
Career Placement
294(1)
Case Management and Termination
294(1)
Research in Career Counseling and Development
294(1)
Summary
295(1)
Projects and Activities
296(1)
References
296(2)
Substance Abuse Counseling
298(25)
Counseling Persons With Alcohol Problems
299(12)
Differences Among Alcoholics, Problem Drinkers, and Social Drinkers
299(1)
The Causes of Alcoholism
300(1)
Pretreatment of Persons With Alcohol Problems
301(1)
Treatment Settings and Goals
302(3)
Alcohol Treatment
305(4)
Adult Children of Alcoholics
309(2)
Counseling Persons With Drug Abuse Problems
311(3)
Types of Drugs
311(2)
Treatment of Drug Abuse
313(1)
Youths and Substance Abuse
314(2)
Substance Abuse in Older Adults
316(1)
Relapse Prevention
316(2)
Training of Substance Abuse Counselors
318(1)
Outcome Research: Substance Abuse Treatment
318(1)
Summary
319(1)
Projects and Activities
320(1)
References
320(3)
Counseling in a Pluralistic World
323(42)
Ethnic Groups: Multicultural Counseling
323(15)
Definition of Multicultural Counseling
324(1)
Early Work
325(1)
Professional Issues
326(4)
Counseling With Representative Ethnic Groups
330(6)
Research on Multicultural Counseling
336(2)
Counseling Women and Men: Gender Role Stereotyping
338(17)
Women: Problems With Role Stereotyping
339(7)
Men: Problems With Male Stereotyping
346(8)
Nonsexist Counselor Training
354(1)
Counselor and Client Match
354(1)
Counseling Gays, Lesbians, and Bisexuals
355(4)
The Counseling Process
355(3)
Parents of Gays and Leshians
358(1)
Counselor Training
358(1)
Counselor and Client Match
359(1)
Summary
359(1)
Projects and Activities
360(1)
References
360(5)
Counseling Older Adults
365(31)
Stereotypes of Older Adults
365(1)
New Perspectives on Older Adults
366(8)
Change in Research Designs
367(1)
Emergence of Life-Span Developmental Theories
367(2)
Developmental Characteristics
369(5)
The Counseling Needs of Older Adults
374(17)
Characteristics of Older Adult Clients
375(3)
Counselor Characteristics
378(1)
The Counseling Process
378(5)
Special Problems of Older Adults
383(5)
Counseling in Long-Term Care Settings
388(2)
Counseling Needs of Caretakers
390(1)
Consultation With Families of Older Adults
391(1)
Outcome Research
391(1)
Summary
392(1)
Projects and Activities
393(1)
References
393(3)
Part 4 Counseling Practice
396(114)
Counseling Programs in Elementary Schools
396(28)
The Role of the Elementary School Counselor
397(5)
Comprehensive School Counseling Programs
398(2)
Developmental Needs of Children
400(1)
Assessment and Evaluation
401(1)
Counseling Children in Elementary Schools
402(7)
Referral Sources
403(1)
Individual Counseling
403(5)
Group Counseling
408(1)
Addressing Cultural Diversity
409(1)
Presenting Problems of Elementary School Children
409(8)
Vocational/Educational Problems
409(3)
Personal Problems
412(1)
Social Problems
412(1)
Persons at Risk
413(4)
Outreach Activities
417(3)
Psychoeducation: Group Guidance
417(1)
Crisis Intervention
418(1)
Consultation
418(1)
Collaboration and Coordination
419(1)
Working With Families
420(1)
Parent Consultation
420(1)
Parent Education
420(1)
Summary
421(1)
Projects and Activities
421(1)
References
422(2)
Counseling Programs in Middle and Secondary Schools
424(25)
Student Developmental Needs
425(1)
The Middle School Counselor
425(1)
The High School Counselor
426(1)
Counseling Students in Middle and Secondary Schools
426(4)
Individual Counseling
427(1)
Group Counseling
428(1)
Addressing Cultural Diversity
428(2)
Presenting Problems of Middle and Secondary Students
430(9)
Career/Educational Issues
430(3)
Personal Problems
433(1)
Social Problems
434(2)
Students at Risk
436(3)
Social Change
439(1)
Outreach Activities
439(6)
Psychoeducation
439(1)
Crisis Intervention
440(1)
Consultation
440(2)
Collaboration and Coordination
442(2)
Career Development
444(1)
Assessment and Evaluation
445(1)
A Day in the Life of a School Counselor
445(1)
Summary
446(1)
Projects and Activities
446(1)
References
447(2)
Counseling Programs in Colleges and Universities
449(26)
Organization and Administration of Counseling Centers
450(3)
Collaboration With Student Services
452(1)
Maintaining Referral Networks
452(1)
University Testing Services
453(1)
Counseling College Students
453(7)
Developmental Needs of College Students
453(3)
Brief Counseling
456(1)
Use of Tests and Inventories
456(1)
Online Counseling
457(1)
Addressing Cultural Diversity
457(2)
Working With Groups
459(1)
Working With Families
459(1)
Presenting Problems of College Students
460(8)
Career/Educational Concerns
461(1)
Personal Concerns
462(2)
Interpersonal Conflicts and Concerns
464(1)
Gender Issues
465(1)
Antisocial Acts and Alcohol Abuse
466(1)
Crises
467(1)
Outreach Activities
468(3)
Developmental Programs
468(1)
Prevention and Intervention Programs
469(1)
Consultation and Collaboration
470(1)
Summary
471(1)
Projects and Activities
472(1)
References
472(3)
Counseling in the Community
475(35)
Current Status and Trends
476(1)
Age-Related Counseling
477(8)
Children and Teenagers
478(1)
Young Adults
479(2)
Adults at Midlife
481(2)
Older Adults
483(2)
Family Counseling and Therapy
485(6)
Job-Related Family Issues
486(1)
Working With Aging Families
486(1)
Ethnic Family Counseling
487(1)
Feminist Family Counseling
488(1)
Sexual Abuse Family Counseling
489(1)
Domestic Violence Therapy
489(1)
Grief Counseling
490(1)
Spiritual Counseling: Searching for Meaning
491(3)
Ethnic Counselors and Spirituality
492(1)
Spiritual Retreats
493(1)
Social, Cultural, and Political Transitions
494(9)
Career Development and Work Adjustment
494(1)
Multicultural Issues
495(2)
Traumas of Poverty and Political Upheaval
497(6)
Counseling Persons at Risk
503(2)
Depression
503(1)
Addictions
504(1)
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
504(1)
Crisis Prevention and Intervention
505(1)
Suicide
505(1)
Violence
506(1)
Summary
506(1)
Projects and Activities
507(1)
References
508(2)
Appendix A ACA Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice 510(17)
Appendix B ACA Divisions 527(1)
Index 528

Excerpts

This book presents a comprehensive introduction to professional counseling, a profession that helps individuals, groups, and families work through troubles arising from situational conflicts experienced in everyday life. Professional counselors help people work through transitional periods, an emphasis especially significant during the shift into the new millennium. Counseling as we know it today developed after World War if largely as a result of the need to help veterans cope during their complex transition back into civilian life. Although the original focus was on assisting them with vocational exploration and training, their emotional and developmental needs soon became apparent. Up to that time, mental health treatment had been limited to a narrow range of techniques used either for managing persons who were chronically mentally ill or for exploring the neuroses of persons who were well-to-do. Neither approach was sufficient for working with normally functioning individuals, who, as a whole, have many varieties of complex and troublesome symptoms requiring a wide range of treatment options.I first sensed the need for helping soldiers work through personal conflicts when I was serving in the U.S. Army during World War 11 as an educational reconditioning specialist at Stark General Hospital in Charleston, South Carolina, one of the army hospitals that received wounded soldiers returning from European battlefields. My task was to help prepare them, through a reeducation process, to return to civilian life. But these soldiers, who had physical disabilities, were suffering from profound anxieties about going home. None of us on the staff were prepared to cope with their mental anguish. Physicians, nurses, and physical therapists were helping them recover physically, but psychiatrists and psychologists were working elsewhere in the psychiatric wards. In those days it was thought that only people with mental illness needed psychological help. But times were changing. My work with the wounded soldiers prompted me, after the war, to obtain a master's degree in vocational counseling at Columbia University and, a few years later, a PhD in the newly formed program of counseling psychology at the University of California-Berkeley. Graduate programs such as these in the late 1940s and the 1950s were beginning to respond to the psychological needs of the general population.The profession of counseling psychology, in its infancy after World War 11, evolved from a mix of vocational, developmental, educational, and psychological theories and practices. These divergent roots pulled the fledgling profession in different directions over the years as it struggled to define and redefine itself. Throughout this period my own professional outlook and experience developed as well. The philosophy and content of this text are based on these experiences.Training programs for counselors likewise have evolved, broadened, and deepened: Programs now include a wide variety of counseling approaches based on psychodynamic, humanistic, cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, and postmodern constructivist and social constructionist theories. Programs now attend to the developing self that evolves throughout one's adult life, a self in relation to others, to one's family, and to one's community. Training programs now attend to a person's holistic concerns--the need to nurture one's body, mind, spirit, land soul in a multicultural society. Feminist and ethnic counselors are influencing the profession significantly, particularly in their emphasis on the need to address client and family concerns in relation to the social-cultural context and the community. Increasing numbers of comprehensive neighborhood health care centers have emerged throughout the country to address the needs of individuals and families within the community.Over the decades, as the counseling profession has adapted to the changing needs of society, it has dev


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...