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Introduction to Programming with Visual Basic.NET, An,9780130306579
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Introduction to Programming with Visual Basic.NET, An

by
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780130306579

ISBN10:
0130306576
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $103.00
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Summary

Designed for readers with no prior computer knowledge, this best-selling book uses Visual Basic.NET to explore the fundamentals of programming in general, and explains how to use Visual Basic.NET to take control of major applications such as Microsoft Office. Not bogged down in detail like other books of this genre, this book is clearly written and easily accessible, while still giving a broad range of examples, case studies, exercises, and programming projects to give the reader significant hands-on experience. An excellent beginner's book, it is very thorough in taking the reader through programming basics by discussing such topics as introduction to computers, using Windows, disks and folders, problem solving, fundamentals of programming in VB.NET, procedures, decisions, repetitions, arrays, sequential files, database management, and object-oriented programming.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Acknowledgments xiii
Accompanying CD xv
Using this Book for a Short or Condensed Course xvii
An Introduction to Computers and VB.NET
1(30)
An Introduction to Computers
2(4)
Using Windows
6(7)
Files and Folders
13(7)
An Introduction to Visual Basic .NET
20(2)
Biographical History of Computing
22(9)
Problem Solving
31(14)
Program-Development Cycle
32(2)
Programming Tools
34(11)
Fundamentals of Programming in VB.NET
45(84)
VB.NET Controls
46(16)
VB.NET Events
62(12)
Numbers
74(16)
Strings
90(16)
Input and Output
106(23)
Summary
125(1)
Programming Projects
126(3)
Procedures
129(62)
Subprograms, Part I
130(22)
Subprograms, Part II
152(16)
Functions
168(14)
Modular Design
182(9)
Summary
186(1)
Programming Projects
187(4)
Decisions
191(52)
Relational and Logical Operators
192(4)
If Blocks
196(18)
Select Case Blocks
214(17)
A Case Study: Weekly Payroll
231(12)
Summary
239(1)
Programming Projects
240(3)
Repetition
243(60)
Do Loops
244(13)
Processing Lists of Data with Do Loops
257(16)
For...Next Loops
273(14)
A Case Study: Analyze a Loan
287(16)
Summary
296(1)
Programming Projects
297(6)
Arrays
303(102)
Creating and Accessing Arrays
304(17)
Using Arrays
321(16)
Some Additional Types of Arrays
337(16)
Sorting and Searching
353(20)
Two-Dimensional Arrays
373(16)
A Case Study: A Sophisticated Cash Register
389(16)
Summary
398(1)
Programming Projects
399(6)
Sequential Files
405(50)
Sequential Files
406(18)
Using Sequential Files
424(12)
A Case Study: Recording Checks and Deposits
436(19)
Summary
448(1)
Programming Projects
449(6)
Additional Controls and Objects
455(38)
List Boxes, Combo Boxes, and the File-Opening Control
456(10)
Seven Elementary Controls
466(11)
Four Additional Objects
477(16)
Summary
489(1)
Programming Projects
490(3)
Database Management
493(30)
An Introduction to Databases
494(11)
Relational Databases and SQL
505(18)
Summary
520(1)
Programming Projects
521(2)
Object-Oriented Programming
523(56)
Classes and Objects
524(17)
Arrays of Objects; Events; Containment
541(14)
Inheritance
555(24)
Summary
575(1)
Programming Projects
576(3)
Appendices 579(32)
Appendix A ANSI Values
579(2)
Appendix B How To
581(14)
Appendix C Converting from Visual Basic 6.0 to VB.NET
595(6)
Appendix D VB.NET Debugging Tools
601(10)
Answers to Selected Odd-Numbered Exercises 611(88)
Index 699

Excerpts

In July 2000, Microsoft announced the .NET initiative. In the announcement, Microsoft chairman Bill Gates said that the goal of .NET is to connect every computing device, from desktop PCs to cell phones, and tie them to the Internet. Since its introduction in 1991, Visual Basic has been the most widely used programming language in the world. The latest incarnation of Visual Basic, called Visual Basic .NET, brings the language into the Internet age by incorporating the .NET Framework. Visual Basic programmers are enthusiastically embracing the new features of the language. Likewise, students learning their first programming language will find VB.NET the ideal tool to understand the development of computer programs. My objectives when writing this text were as follows: To develop focused chapters.Rather than covering many topics superficially, I concentrate on important subjects and cover them thoroughly. To use examples and exercises that students can appreciate and with which they can relate, and feel comfortable.I frequently use real data. Examples do not have so many embellishments that students are distracted from the programming techniques illustrated. To produce compactly written text that students will find both readable and informative.The main points of each topic are discussed first, and then the peripheral details are presented as comments. To teach good programming practices that are in step with modern programming methodology.Problem-solving techniques and structured programming are discussed early and used throughout the book. The style follows object-oriented programming principles. To provide insights into the major applications of computers. Unique and Distinguishing Features Exercises for Most Sections.Each section that teaches programming has an exercise set. The exercises both reinforce the understanding of the key ideas of the section and challenge the student to explore applications. Most of the exercise sets require the student to trace programs, find errors, and write programs. The answers to all the odd-numbered exercises in Chapters 2 through 10 and selected odd-numbered exercises from Chapter 11 are given at the end of the text. Practice Problems.Practice Problems are carefully selected exercises located at the end of a section, just before the exercise set. Complete solutions are given following the exercise set. The practice problems often focus on points that are potentially confusing or are best appreciated after the student has worked on them. The reader should seriously attempt the practice problems and study their solutions before moving on to the exercises. Programming Projects.Beginning with Chapter 3, chapters contain programming projects. The programming projects not only reflect the variety of ways that computers are used in the business community, but also present some games and general-interest topics. The large number and range of difficulty of the programming projects provide the flexibility to adapt the course to the interests and abilities of the students. Some programming projects in later chapters can be assigned as end-of-the-semester projects. Comments.Extensions and fine points of new topics are deferred to the "Comments" portion at the end of each section so that they will not interfere with the flow of the presentation. Case Studies.Each of the four case studies focuses on an important programming application. The problems are analyzed and the programs are developed with top-down charts and pseudocode. The programs can be found in the PROGRAMS directory of the accompanying CD. Chapter Summaries.In Chapters 3 through 11, the key results are stated and the important terms are summarized at the end of the chapter. Procedures.The ear


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