CART

(0) items

Introduction to Public Health,9780763730000
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Introduction to Public Health

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780763730000

ISBN10:
0763730009
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
10/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Jones & Bartlett

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 10/1/2005.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Related Products


  • Introduction to Public Health
    Introduction to Public Health
  • Introduction to Public Health
    Introduction to Public Health





Summary

This comprehensive new edition illustrates the multidisciplinary nature of public health And The complex ethical and political issues central to it. it includes discussions of epidemiological investigation, biomedical research, environmental assessment, analyses of individual and group behavior, massive data collection efforts, and policy developments. In light of the changing world, further bioterrorism issues have been woven through relevant chapters. New additions in epidemiology include anthrax and SARS.  Additions in women's health consider new developments in hormone replacement therapy. A new emphasis has been placed on planning to include natural disasters as well as terrorism. Introduction to Public Health, Second Edition covers the basic elements of public health as well as essential data and statistics.

Author Biography

Mary-Jane Schneider, PhD, is Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, Clinical Associate Professor of Health Policy, Management, and Behavior, and Interim Director of Professional Education, School of Public Health, University at Albany, SUNY

Table of Contents

Preface to the First Edition xv
Preface to the Second Edition xix
Acknowledgments xxi
Prologue xxv
PART I WHAT IS PUBLIC HEALTH? 1(48)
Chapter 1 Public Health: Science, Politics, and Prevention
3(14)
What Is Public Health?
4(2)
Public Health versus Medical Care
6(2)
The Sciences of Public Health
8(4)
Prevention and Intervention
12(2)
Public Health and Terrorism
14(1)
Conclusion
15(2)
Chapter 2 Why Is Public Health Controversial?
17(14)
Economic Impact
20(2)
Individual Liberty
22(2)
Moral and Religious Opposition
24(2)
Political Interference with Science
26(2)
Conclusion
28(3)
Chapter 3 Powers and Responsibilities of Government
31(18)
Federal versus State Authority
32(2)
How the Law Works
34(2)
How Public Health Is Organized and Paid For in the United States
36(8)
Local Public Health Agencies
36(1)
State Health Departments
37(1)
Federal Agencies Involved with Public Health
38(6)
Nongovernmental Role in Public Health
44(2)
Conclusion
46(3)
PART II ANALYTICAL METHODS OF PUBLIC HEALTH 49(86)
Chapter 4 Epidemiology: The Basic Science of Public Health
51(18)
How Epidemiology Works
52(2)
A Typical Epidemiologic Investigation: Outbreak of Hepatitis
54(3)
Legionnaires' Disease
57(1)
Eosinophilia-Myalgia Syndrome
58(3)
Epidemiology and the Causes of Chronic Disease
61(1)
Heart Disease
62(2)
Lung Cancer
64(3)
Conclusion
67(2)
Chapter 5 Epidemiologic Principles and Methods
69(16)
Kinds of Epidemiologic Studies
74(1)
Intervention Studies
75(2)
Cohort Studies
77(2)
Case-Control Studies
79(2)
Conclusion
81(4)
Chapter 6 Problems and Limits of Epidemiology
85(14)
Problems with Studying Humans
86(1)
Sources of Error
87(3)
Proving Cause and Effect
90(1)
Epidemiologic Studies of Hormone Replacement Therapy—Confusing Results
91(2)
Ethics in Epidemiology
93(3)
Conclusion
96(3)
Chapter 7 Statistics: Making Sense of Uncertainty
99(22)
The Uncertainty of Science
100(3)
Probability
103(2)
The Statistics of Screening Tests
105(1)
Rates and Other Calculated Statistics
106(6)
Risk Assessment and Risk Perception
112(4)
Cost-Benefit Analysis and Other Evaluation Methods
116(1)
Conclusion
117(4)
Chapter 8 The Role of Data in Public Health
121(14)
Vital Statistics
122(1)
The Census
123(3)
NCHS Surveys and Other Sources of Health Data
126(2)
Is So Much Data Really Necessary?
128(1)
Accuracy and Availability of Data
129(1)
Confidentiality of Data
130(1)
Conclusion
131(4)
PART III BIOMEDICAL BASIS OF PUBLIC HEALTH 135(80)
Chapter 9 The "Conquest" of Infectious Diseases
137(20)
Infectious Agents
139(2)
Means of Transmission
141(2)
Chain of Infection
143(5)
Rabies
148(2)
Smallpox, Measles, and Polio
150(3)
Fear of Vaccines
153(1)
Conclusion
154(3)
Chapter 10 The Resurgence of Infectious Diseases
157(26)
The Biomedical Basis of AIDS
158(5)
Other Emerging Viruses
163(3)
Influenza
166(2)
New Bacterial Threats
168(3)
Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis
171(4)
Prions
175(1)
Public Health Response to Emerging Infections
176(1)
Public Health and the Threat of Bioterrorism
177(1)
Conclusion
178(5)
Chapter 11 The Biomedical Basis of Chronic Diseases
183(14)
Cardiovascular Disease
185(4)
Cancer
189(3)
Diabetes
192(1)
Other Chronic Diseases
193(1)
Conclusion
194(3)
Chapter 12 Genetic Diseases and Other Inborn Errors
197(18)
Environmental Teratogens
198(5)
Genetic and Newborn Screening Programs
203(3)
Genomic Medicine
206(2)
Ethical Issues and Genetic Diseases
208(3)
Conclusion
211(4)
PART IV SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL FACTORS IN HEALTH 215(116)
Chapter 13 Do People Choose Their Own Health?
217(14)
Education
221(4)
Regulation
225(1)
Does Prohibition Work?
226(2)
Conclusion
228(3)
Chapter 14 How Psychosocial Factors Affect Health Behavior
231(18)
Health of Minority Populations
234(1)
Stress and Social Support
235(2)
Psychological Models of Health Behavior
237(2)
Ecological Model of Health Behavior
239(3)
Health Promotion Programs
242(2)
Changing the Environment
244(1)
Conclusion
245(4)
Chapter 15 Tobacco—Public Health Enemy Number One
249(20)
Biomedical Basis of Smoking's Harmful Effects
251(1)
Historical Trends in Smoking and Health
252(3)
Regulatory Restrictions on Smoking New Focus on Environmental Tobacco Smoke
255(2)
Emphasis on Youth—Advertising
257(1)
Taxes as a Public Health Measure
258(2)
California's Tobacco Control Program
260(2)
The Master Settlement Agreement
262(3)
Conclusion
265(4)
Chapter 16 Public Health Threat Number Two and Growing: Poor Diet and Physical Inactivity
269(24)
Epidemiology of Obesity
270(5)
Diet and Nutrition
275(2)
Promoting Healthy Eating
277(4)
Physical Activity and Health
281(2)
How Much Exercise Is Enough, and How Much Do People Get?
283(3)
Promoting Physical Activity
286(2)
Confronting the Obesity Epidemic
288(1)
Conclusion
288(5)
Chapter 17 Injuries Are Not Accidents
293(18)
Epidemiology of Injuries
294(3)
Analyzing Injuries
297(2)
Motor Vehicle Injuries
299(3)
Pedestrians, Motorcyclists, and Bicyclists
302(1)
Firearms Injury—Still Number Two
303(2)
Occupational Injuries
305(2)
Tertiary Prevention
307(1)
Conclusion
307(4)
Chapter 18 Maternal and Child Health as a Social Problem
311(20)
Maternal and Infant Mortality
312(3)
Infant Mortality: Health Problem or Social Problem?
315(2)
Preventing Infant Mortality
317(4)
Family Planning and Prevention of Adolescent Pregnancy
321(2)
Nutrition of Women and Children
323(1)
Children's Health and Safety
324(3)
Conclusion
327(4)
PART V ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN PUBLIC HEALTH 331(100)
Chapter 19 A Clean Environment: The Basis of Public Health
333(18)
Role of Government in Environmental Health
335(1)
Identification of Hazards
335(5)
Pesticides and Industrial Chemicals
340(3)
Occupational Exposures: Workers as Guinea Pigs
343(1)
New Source of Pollution: Factory Farms
344(1)
Setting Standards: How Safe Is Safe?
345(1)
Risk-Benefit Analysis
346(1)
Conclusion
347(4)
Chapter 20 Clean Air: Is It Safe to Breathe?
351(16)
Criteria Air Pollutants
352(3)
Strategies for Meeting Standards
355(5)
Indoor Air Quality
360(1)
Global Effects of Air Pollution
361(2)
Conclusion
363(4)
Chapter 21 Clean Water: A Limited Resource
367(16)
Clean Water Act
369(2)
Safe Drinking Water
371(6)
Dilemmas in Compliance
377(2)
Is the Water Supply Running Out?
379(1)
Conclusion
379(4)
Chapter 22 Solid and Hazardous Wastes: What To Do With the Garbage?
383(12)
Sanitary Landfills
385(1)
Alternatives to Landfills
386(2)
Hazardous Wastes
388(5)
Conclusion
393(2)
Chapter 23 Safe Food and Drugs: An Ongoing Regulatory Battle
395(20)
Causes of Food-Borne Illness
396(2)
Government Action to Prevent Food-Borne Disease
398(6)
Additives and Contaminants
404(1)
Drugs and Cosmetics
405(1)
Food and Drug Labeling and Advertising
406(2)
Politics of the FDA
408(3)
Conclusion
411(4)
Chapter 24 Population: The Ultimate Environmental Health Issue
415(16)
Public Health and Population Growth
418(2)
Global Impact of Population Growth Depletion of Resources
420(3)
Global Impact of Population Growth Climate Change
423(3)
Dire Predictions and Fragile Hope
426(2)
Conclusion
428(3)
PART VI MEDICAL CARE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 431(82)
Chapter 25 Is the Medical Care System a Public Health Issue?
433(18)
When Medical Care is a Public Health Responsibility
434(2)
The Conflict between Public Health and the Medical Profession
436(4)
Licensing and Regulation
440(1)
Ethical and Legal Issues in Medical Care
441(4)
Ethical Issues in Medical Resource Allocation
445(2)
Conclusion
447(4)
Chapter 26 Why the U.S. Medical System Needs Reform
451(16)
Why Do Costs Keep Rising?
455(3)
Approaches to Controlling Medical Costs
458(1)
Managed Care—Not a Panacea
459(2)
Rationing
461(2)
Conclusion
463(4)
Chapter 27 Health Services Research: Finding What Works
467(22)
Reasons for Practice Variations
469(2)
The Field of Dreams Effect
471(2)
Outcomes Research
473(3)
Quality
476(1)
Medical Care Report Cards
477(3)
Inequities in Medical Care
480(1)
The Relative Importance of Medical Care for Public Health
481(3)
Conclusion
484(5)
Chapter 28 Public Health and the Aging Population
489(24)
The Aging of the Population—Trends
490(2)
Health Status of the Older Population
492(3)
General Approaches to Maximizing Health in Old Age
495(3)
Preventing Disease and Disability in Old Age
498(7)
Medications
498(1)
Osteoporosis
499(1)
Falls
500(1)
Impairment of Vision and Hearing
501(1)
Oral Health
502(1)
Alzheimer's and Other Dementias
503(2)
Medical Costs of the Elderly
505(3)
Proposals for Rationing
508(1)
Conclusion
509(4)
PART VII THE FUTURE OF PUBLIC HEALTH 513(40)
Chapter 29 Emergency Preparedness, Post-9/11
515(20)
Types of Disasters and Public Health Responses
516(2)
New York's Response to the World Trade Center Attacks
518(2)
Principles of Emergency Planning and Preparedness
520(3)
Bioterrorism Preparedness
523(5)
Smallpox
528(2)
Conclusion
530(5)
Chapter 30 Public Health in the Twenty-First Century: Achievements and Challenges
535(18)
Challenges for the Twenty-First Century
537(2)
Strategic Planning for Public Health
539(4)
Hope for the Integration of Public Health and Medical Practice
543(2)
Information Technology
545(2)
The Challenge of Biotechnology
547(1)
The Ultimate Challenge to Public Health in the Twenty-First Century
548(1)
Conclusion
548(5)
Index 553


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...