9780132808507

Introduction to Wildlife Management The Basics

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780132808507

  • ISBN10:

    0132808501

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2001-06-18
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

Introduction to Wildlife Management is written for beginning and advanced wildlife students, and as a reference for professionals who want to brush up on the basics of their profession. Unlike other texts that try to cover wildlife ecology and management in their entirety, Krausman assumes students have a background in ecology and focuses on wildlife management. This text is not written to serve as the only source of information for this field of study, but was designed to provide a solid foundation in the basic concepts used to manage wildlife and to provide a solid reference source for additional reading. Krausman's clean, clear, accessible writing style effectively conveys the core underpins of the profession of wildlife management, while allowing instructors maximum flexibility in teaching the course.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Sources of Chapter Opening Quotations xiii
Defining Wildlife Management
1(6)
Introduction
1(1)
Defining Wildlife Management
2(4)
The Political Discipline
3(1)
Active vs. Inactive Management
4(1)
The Goals of Management
4(1)
The Wildlife Being Managed
5(1)
Summary
6(1)
Evolution of Wildlife Management: Our Roots
7(19)
Introduction
7(1)
Evolution of Wildlife Management
8(6)
Evolution of Wildlife Management in Europe and Asia
8(2)
Wildlife Management in Great Britain
10(4)
Brief History of Wildlife Management in North America
14(11)
Placing Man and Wildlife in America
14(2)
The Spanish (1500s)
16(1)
Other Europeans (1500s-1600s)
17(1)
Russians (1700s)
17(1)
The Colonists
18(1)
The Era of Exploitation
18(7)
Summary
25(1)
The Conservation Idea
26(16)
Introduction
26(1)
The Conservation Idea
26(15)
Conservation Movements in America
27(1)
The Beginning of Conservation
28(11)
Personalities that Shaped Conservation in the United States
39(2)
Summary
41(1)
The Professional Wildlife Biologist
42(38)
Introduction
42(1)
The Professional Wildlife Biologist
42(5)
Required Education
43(4)
Employment Opportunities
47(5)
Wildlife Managers
49(1)
Wildlife Law Enforcement
50(1)
Wildlife Research
50(1)
Public Relations and Extension
50(1)
Wildlife Education
51(1)
Wildlife Administration
51(1)
Private Organizations
51(1)
Consultants
51(1)
Public Agencies
52(1)
Summary
52(1)
Appendix 4A
53(9)
Appendix 4B
62(18)
Basic Concepts of Population Dynamics
80(35)
Introduction
80(1)
Some Historical Roots
80(6)
Pioneers of Population Dynamics
82(1)
The Population Concept
83(3)
Basic Population Parameters
86(28)
Birth Rate or Natality
86(6)
Fecundity and Fertility
92(4)
Age Pyramids
96(1)
Mortality
96(4)
Life Table
100(3)
Life Table Data
103(2)
General Types of Life Tables
105(2)
The Value of Life Tables
107(3)
The Life Equation
110(2)
Emigration and Immigration
112(2)
Summary
114(1)
Rate of Increase and Population Growth
115(18)
Introduction
115(1)
What are Rates?
116(3)
Measuring the Rate of Increase
119(5)
The Influence of Age Distributions On rm
124(2)
The Growth of a Population
126(6)
Summary
132(1)
The Concept of Carrying Capacity
133(9)
Introduction
133(1)
Different Views of Carrying Capacity
133(7)
Ecologically Based Carrying Capacities
134(4)
Culturally Based Carrying Capacities
138(2)
Measuring K-Carrying Capacity
140(1)
Summary
141(1)
Leopold's Population Model
142(10)
Introduction
142(3)
Aldo's Model
145(2)
Compensatory Mortality
147(1)
Diagnosis of Productivity
148(3)
Summary
151(1)
Decimating Fctors: Predation
152(16)
Introduction
152(1)
Types of Predation
153(1)
Understanding Predation
154(3)
Density
155(1)
Behavior
155(2)
Effects of Predation
157(6)
Alternate Prey
163(1)
Predator Control
163(4)
Summary
167(1)
Decimating Factors: Hunting
168(14)
Introduction
168(1)
Setting Harvest Management Goals
169(3)
Measuring the Harvest
172(4)
Population Management with Hunting
176(4)
Sustained Yield (SY)
177(1)
Maximum Sustained Yield (MSY)
177(1)
SY and MSY in Theory
178(2)
The Legal Basis of Harvest Regulation
180(1)
Agency Review
180(1)
Public Review
180(1)
Wildlife Commission or Board
181(1)
Summary
181(1)
Decimating Factors: Disease
182(31)
Introduction
182(1)
Causes of Disease
183(6)
Selected Diseases of Migratory Birds
189(7)
Bacterial Diseases
189(5)
Viral Diseases
194(1)
Fungal Diseases
194(1)
Parasitic Diseases
195(1)
Toxic Disease
195(1)
Selected Diseases of Mammals
196(16)
Bacterial Diseases
197(7)
Rickettsial Diseases
204(1)
Viral Diseases
204(5)
Internal and External Parasites
209(1)
Internal Parasites
209(1)
External Parasites
209(3)
Summary
212(1)
Decimating Factors: Accidents and Starvation
213(11)
Introduction
213(1)
Accidents
213(8)
Major Accidents that Kill Birds
215(3)
Major Accidents that Kill Mammals, Reptiles, and Amphibians
218(3)
Starvation
221(2)
Summary
223(1)
Welfare Factors: Forage
224(21)
Introduction
224(1)
Food, Forage, or Nutrition
225(13)
Protein
226(1)
Minerals
227(1)
Vitamins
227(5)
Seasonality and Secondary Plant Compounds
232(1)
Other Nutritional Considerations
233(5)
Energy Requirements
238(2)
Animal Condition Indices
240(4)
Summary
244(1)
Welfare Factors: Water, Cover, and Special Factors
245(25)
Introduction
245(1)
Water
245(19)
Management of Water for Wildlife
247(1)
Birds
248(1)
Mammals
249(9)
The Benefits of Water Developments
258(1)
Types of Water Catchments
259(5)
Cover
264(5)
Special Factors
269(1)
Summary
269(1)
Censusing Wildlife Populations
270(22)
Introduction
270(1)
Census Terminology
271(3)
Estimates of Animal Abundance
274(17)
Complete Counts (i.e., All Individuals Observed)
274(3)
Complete Counts Without Counting All Individuals
277(4)
Sample Counts but Incomplete
281(3)
Incomplete Counts (Estimates of Relative or Absolute Density)
284(3)
Ratio Methods
287(3)
Distance Methods
290(1)
Miscellaneous Methods
290(1)
Summary
291(1)
The Basics of Habitat
292(20)
Introduction
292(1)
Habitat Terminology
293(4)
General Concepts Related to Habitat Use
297(5)
Habitat Has a Specific Meaning
297(1)
Habitat is Species Specific
297(3)
Habitat is Scale Dependent
300(1)
Measurements Matter
301(1)
Managing Habitat
302(8)
Basic Habitat Management Techniques
303(7)
Summary
310(2)
Economics in Wildlife Management
312(19)
Introduction
312(2)
Commercial Values
314(1)
Economic Philosophies
315(14)
Management Incentives
329(1)
Summary
330(1)
Contemporary and Classical Issues in Wildlife Management
331(35)
Introduction
331(1)
Exotics
331(10)
Wildlife-Livestock Interactions
341(14)
Translocations
355(4)
Reasons to Move Wildlife
357(1)
Potential Problems with Animal Translocations
357(1)
The Basics of Translocations
357(2)
From Game Management to Biodiversity Management
359(4)
Minimum Viable Population
363(2)
Summary
365(1)
Wildlife Management in the Twenty-First Century
366(7)
From Leopold to the Next Century
366(7)
Intelligent Tinkering
370(3)
Appendix 373(8)
Glossary 381(42)
Literature Cited 423(46)
Index 469

Excerpts

"What has happened before will happen again. What has been done before will be done again. There is nothing new in the whole world." - Ecclesiastes 1:9Because of human domination of the earth, wildlife is dependent upon mankind for its existence. Unfortunately, our efforts have not always been successful and we are still struggling to find ways to effectively maintain the habitats to ensure the existence of many animals. It is a complex process and the young field of wildlife management has served as a springboard for a host of yet even younger disciplines including conservation biology, landscape ecology, ecosystem management, and human dimensions. These new fields and their associated jargon are important to conservation and management of wild flora and fauna. However, students in these disciplines should be well founded in the basic principles that underlie the functioning of healthy populations. To that end, those students should have a strong background in ecology and the basic principles of wildlife management. After all, wildlife is the emphasis of the numerous groups, organizations, and federal, state, and international agencies charged with maintaining and enhancing wild and natural places, and places not so wild. I have yet to find The Book on wildlife management and have relied on a variety of media to teach wildlife courses (e.g., textbooks, journals, labs, popular literature, and news). Hands-on laboratories often provide lasting examples of wildlife management practices. However, students also have to be exposed to the underpins of the profession. That is the purpose here.Introduction to Wildlife Management: The Basicswas written for beginning and advanced wildlife students, and as a reference for professionals who want to brush up on the basics of their profession. All users are expected to have a background in ecology and beginning students would obviously need more lecture time than advanced students. The text was not written to serve as the only source of information, but was designed to include the basic concepts used to manage wildlife and to provide a solid reference source for additional reading.Many thanks to B. Ballard, J.A. Bissonette, B. Czech, E. de Steiguer, M.L. Morrison, and M. C. Wallace who provided helpful commends about previous drafts; to S. Gillatt, who drafted many of the figures; and to V Calt and D. Brown, who assisted with production. Thanks also to reviewers Mark Wallace, Texas Tech University; and Ronald M. Case, University of Nebraska, who provided valuable insight and helpful feedback.

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