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Introductory Chemistry With Infotrac: An Active Learning Approach, Looseleaf Version (Book with CD-ROM),9780534407292
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Introductory Chemistry With Infotrac: An Active Learning Approach, Looseleaf Version (Book with CD-ROM)

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780534407292

ISBN10:
0534407293
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/25/2003
Publisher(s):
Brooks Cole
List Price: $68.33

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Summary

Now available at a new low price as part of Thomson Advantage Books and in two flexible formats--a standard paperbound edition and loose-leaf edition--this best-selling textbook for courses in introductory chemistry allows professors to tailor the order of chapters to accommodate their particular needs. The authors have achieved this modularity not only by carefully writing each topic so it never assumes prior knowledge, but also by including any and all necessary preview or review information needed to learn that topic. New lead author Dr. Mark Cracolice, Director for the Center of Teaching Excellence at the University of Montana and chemical education specialist, has added current and relevant applications and has infused the text with original pedagogical elements. Cracolice has also seamlessly integrated the text with the extensive media-based teaching aids available to create a unified package for this edition.

Table of Contents

1 INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY; INTRODUCTION TO ACTIVE LEARNING 1(14)
1.1 Lavoisier and the Beginning of Experimental Chemistry
3(1)
1.2 Science and the Scientific Method
4(1)
1.3 The Science of Chemistry Today
5(1)
1.4 Learning How to Learn Chemistry
6(3)
1.5 Your Textbook
9(4)
1.6 A Choice
13(2)
2 MATTER AND ENERGY 15(30)
2.1 Models and Symbolic Representations of Matter
16(2)
2.2 States of Matter
18(3)
2.3 Physical and Chemical Properties and Changes
21(3)
2.4 Pure Substances and Mixtures
24(2)
2.5 Separation of Mixtures
26(2)
2.6 Elements and Compounds
28(4)
2.7 The Electrical Character of Matter
32(1)
2.8 Characteristics of a Chemical Change
33(1)
2.9 Conservation Laws and Chemical Change
34(11)
3 MEASUREMENT AND CHEMICAL CALCULATIONS 45(46)
3.1 Introduction to Measurement
47(1)
3.2 Exponential (Scientific) Notation
47(4)
3.3 Dimensional Analysis
51(7)
3.4 Metric Units
58(5)
3.5 Significant Figures
63(8)
3.6 Metric-USCS Conversions
71(1)
3.7 Temperature
72(4)
3.8 Proportionality and Density
76(3)
3.9 A Strategy for Solving Problems
79(2)
3.10 Thoughtful and Reflective Practice
81(10)
4 INTRODUCTION TO GASES 91(22)
4.1 Properties of Gases
92(1)
4.2 The Kinetic Theory of Gases and the Ideal Gas Model
93(1)
4.3 Gas Measurements
94(4)
4.4 The Volume-Temperature (Charles's) Law
98(5)
4.5 The Volume-Pressure (Boyle's) Law
103(3)
4.6 The Combined Gas Law
106(7)
5 ATOMIC THEORY: THE NUCLEAR MODEL OF THE ATOM 113(22)
5.1 Dalton's Atomic Theory
115(1)
5.2 Subatomic Particles
116(1)
5.3 The Nuclear Atom
117(2)
5.4 Isotopes
119(2)
5.5 Atomic Mass
121(2)
5.6 The Periodic Table
123(3)
5.7 Elemental Symbols and the Periodic Table
126(9)
6 CHEMICAL NOMENCLATURE 135(34)
6.1 Introduction to Nomenclature
136(1)
6.2 Formulas of Elements
136(2)
6.3 Compounds Made from Two Nonmetals
138(1)
6.4 Names and Formulas of Ions Formed by One Element
139(4)
6.5 Acids and the Anions Derived from Their Total Ionization
143(7)
6.6 Names and Formulas of Acid Anions
150(1)
6.7 Names and Formulas of Other Acids and Ions
151(1)
6.8 Formulas of Ionic Compounds
152(5)
6.9 Names of Ionic Compounds 156
6.10 Hydrates
157(1)
6.11 Summary of the Nomenclature System
157(1)
6.12 Common Names of Chemicals
157(12)
7 CHEMICAL FORMULA RELATIONSHIPS 169(30)
7.1 The Number of Atoms in a Formula
170(1)
7.2 Molecular Mass and Formula Mass
171(4)
7.3 The Mole Concept
175(1)
7.4 Molar Mass
176(1)
7.5 Conversion among Mass, Number of Moles, and Number of Units
177(3)
7.6 Mass Relationships among Elements in a Compound: Percentage Composition
180(3)
7.7 The Quantitative Meaning of a Chemical Formula: A Summary
183(2)
7.8 Empirical Formula of a Compound
185(5)
7.9 Determination of a Molecular Formula
190(9)
8 REACTIONS AND EQUATIONS 199(24)
8.1 Evolution of a Chemical Equation
200(2)
8.2 Balancing Chemical Equations
202(3)
8.3 Interpreting Chemical Equations
205(1)
8.4 Writing Chemical Equations
206(1)
8.5 Combination Reactions
207(1)
8.6 Decomposition Reactions
208(1)
8.7 Complete Oxidation or Burning of Organic Compounds
209(1)
8.8 Single-Replacement Oxidation-Reduction (Redox) Reactions
210(3)
8.9 Double-Replacement Precipitation Reactions
213(1)
8.10 Double-Replacement Neutralization Reactions
214(2)
8.11 Summary of Reactions and Equations
216(7)
9 QUANTITY RELATIONSHIPS IN CHEMICAL REACTIONS 223(40)
9.1 Conversion Factors from a Chemical Equation
224(2)
9.2 Mass Calculations
226(4)
9.3 Gas Stoichiometry at Standard Temperature and Pressure (Optional)
230(3)
9.4 Gas Stoichiometry at Nonstandard Conditions (Optional)
233(3)
9.5 Percent Yield
236(5)
9.6 Limiting Reactants: The Problem
241(2)
9.7 Limiting Reactants: Comparison-of-Moles Method
243(4)
9.8 Limiting Reactants: Smaller-Amount Method
247(2)
9.9 Energy
249(1)
9.10 Thermochemical Equations
250(2)
9.11 Thermochemical Stoichiometry
252(11)
10 ATOMIC THEORY: THE QUANTUM MODEL OF THE ATOM 263(30)
10.1 The Bohr Model of the Hydrogen Atom
264(3)
10.2 The Quantum Mechanical Model of the Atom
267(5)
10.3 Electron Configuration
272(7)
10.4 Valence Electrons
279(1)
10.5 Trends in the Periodic Table
280(13)
11 CHEMICAL BONDING 293(22)
11.1 Monatomic Ions with Noble-Gas Electron Configurations
294(2)
11.2 Ionic Bonds
296(3)
11.3 Covalent Bonds
299(2)
11.4 Polar and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds
301(2)
11.5 Multiple Bonds
303(1)
11.6 Atoms That Are Bonded to Two or More Other Atoms
303(1)
11.7 Exceptions to the Octet Rule
304(2)
11.8 Metallic Bonds
306(9)
12 STRUCTURE AND SHAPE 315(32)
12.1 Drawing Lewis Diagrams
316(8)
12.2 Electron-Pair Repulsion: Electron-Pair Geometry
324(2)
12.3 Molecular Geometry
326(7)
12.4 The Geometry of Multiple Bonds
333(1)
12.5 Polarity of Molecules
334(2)
12.6 The Structure of Some Organic Compounds (Optional)
336(11)
13 THE IDEAL GAS LAW AND ITS APPLICATIONS 347(26)
13.1 Gases Revisited
348(1)
13.2 The Volume-Amount (Avogadro's) Law
349(2)
13.3 The Ideal Gas Law
351(1)
13.4 The Ideal Gas Equation: Determination of a Single Variable
352(2)
13.5 Gas Density and Molar Volume
354(4)
13.6 Gas Stoichiometry at Standard Temperature and Pressure
358(2)
13.7 Gas Stoichiometry: Molar Volume Method
360(2)
13.8 Gas Stoichiometry: Ideal Gas Equation Method
362(2)
13.9 Volume-Volume Gas Stoichiometry
364(9)
14 COMBINED GAS LAW APPLICATIONS 373(26)
14.1 Gases Revisited
374(1)
14.2 Molar Volume
375(2)
14.3 Three Ratios: Gas Density, Molar Volume, and Molar Mass
377(3)
14.4 Three-Ratio Problems
380(3)
14.5 Gas Stoichiometry at Standard Temperature and Pressure
383(2)
14.6 Gas Stoichiometry: Molar Volume Method
385(2)
14.7 Gas Stoichiometry: Combined Gas Equation Method
387(2)
14.8 Volume-Volume Gas Stoichiometry
389(10)
15 GASES, LIQUIDS, AND SOLIDS 399(34)
15.1 Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures
400(2)
15.2 Properties of Liquids
402(2)
15.3 Types of Intermolecular Forces
404(4)
15.4 Liquid-Vapor Equilibrium
408(4)
15.5 The Boiling Process
412(1)
15.6 Water-An "Unusual" Compound
413(1)
15.7 The Solid State
414(1)
15.8 Types of Crystalline Solids
415(2)
15.9 Energy and Change of State
417(3)
15.10 Energy and Change of Temperature: Specific Heat
420(2)
15.11 Change in Temperature Plus Change of State
422(11)
16 SOLUTIONS 433(40)
16.1 The Characteristics of a Solution
434(1)
16.2 Solution Terminology
434(1)
16.3 The Formation of a Solution
435(3)
16.4 Factors That Determine Solubility
438(1)
16.5 Solution Concentration: Percentage by Mass
439(2)
16.6 Solution Concentration: Molarity
441(3)
16.7 Solution Concentration: Molarity (Optional)
444(2)
16.8 Solution Concentration: Normality (Optional)
446(5)
16.9 Solution Concentration: A Summary
451(1)
16.10 Dilution of Concentrated Solutions
452(1)
16.11 Solution Stoichiometry
453(3)
16.12 Titration Using Molarity
456(3)
16.13 Titration Using Normality (Optional)
459(2)
16.14 Colligative Properties of Solutions (Optional)
461(12)
17 NET IONIC EQUATIONS 473(28)
17.1 Electrolytes and Solution Conductivity
474(1)
17.2 Solutions of Ionic Compounds
475(2)
17.3 Strong and Weak Acids
477(3)
17.4 Net Ionic Equations: What They Are and How to Write Them
480(3)
17.5 Single-Replacement Oxidation-Reduction (Redox) Reactions
483(3)
17.6 Ion Combinations That Form Precipitates
486(5)
17.7 Ion Combinations That Form Molecules
491(2)
17.8 Ion Combinations That Form Unstable Products
493(1)
17.9 Ion-Combination Reactions with Undissolved Reactants
494(1)
17.10 Other Ion Combinations
495(1)
17.11 Summary of Net Ionic Equations
495(6)
18 ACID-BASE (PROTON-TRANSFER) REACTIONS 501(26)
18.1 The Arrhenius Theory of Acids and Bases
502(1)
18.2 The Brønsted-Lowry Theory of Acids and Bases
503(2)
18.3 The Lewis Theory of Acids and Bases (Optional)
505(1)
18.4 Conjugate Acid-Base Pairs
506(2)
18.5 Relative Strengths of Acids and Bases
508(2)
18.6 Predicting Acid-Base Reactions
510(2)
18.7 Acid-Base Reactions and Redox Reactions Compared
512(1)
18.8 The Water Equilibrium
512(2)
18.9 pH and pOH (Integer Values Only)
514(4)
18.10 Noninteger pH-[H+] and pOH-[OH] Conversions (Optional)
518(9)
19 OXIDATION-REDUCTION (REDOX) REACTIONS 527(24)
19.1 Electrolytic and Voltaic Cells
528(1)
19.2 Electron-Transfer Reactions
529(3)
19.3 Oxidation Numbers and Redox Reactions
532(4)
19.4 Oxidizing Agents (Oxidizers) and Reducing Agents (Reducers)
536(1)
19.5 Strengths of Oxidizing Agents and Reducing Agents
537(1)
19.6 Predicting Redox Reactions
538(4)
19.7 Redox Reactions and Acid-Base Reactions Compared
542(1)
19.8 Writing Redox Equations (Optional)
543(8)
20 CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM 551(34)
20.1 The Character of an Equilibrium
552(1)
20.2 The Collision Theory of Chemical Reactions
552(2)
20.3 Energy Changes during a Molecular Collision
554(2)
20.4 Conditions That Affect the Rate of a Chemical Reaction
556(2)
20.5 The Development of a Chemical Equilibrium
558(1)
20.6 Le Chatelier's Principle
559(5)
20.7 The Equilibrium Constant
564(3)
20.8 The Significance of the Value of K
567(1)
20.9 Equilibrium Calculations (Optional)
568(17)
21 NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY 585(26)
21.1 The Dawn of Nuclear Chemistry
586(1)
21.2 Radioactivity
586(2)
21.3 The Detection and Measurement of Radioactivity
588(1)
21.4 The Effects of Radiation on Living Systems
589(2)
21.5 Half-Life
591(4)
21.6 Natural Radioactive Decay Series-Nuclear Equations
595(3)
21.7 Nuclear Reactions and Ordinary Chemical Reactions Compared
598(1)
21.8 Nuclear Bombardment and Induced Radioactivity
598(2)
21.9 Uses of Radionuclides
600(1)
21.10 Nuclear Fission
601(2)
21.11 Electrical Energy from Nuclear Fission
603(1)
21.12 Nuclear Fusion
604(7)
22 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 611(42)
22.1 The Nature of Organic Chemistry
612(1)
22.2 The Molecular Structure of Organic Compounds
613(2)
22.3 Saturated Hydrocarbons: The Alkanes and Cycloalkanes
615(5)
22.4 Unsaturated Hydrocarbons: The Alkenes and the Alkynes
620(3)
22.5 Aromatic Hydrocarbons
623(2)
22.6 Summary of the Hydrocarbons
625(1)
22.7 Sources and Preparation of Hydrocarbons
625(1)
22.8 Chemical Reactions of Hydrocarbons
626(2)
22.9 Uses of Hydrocarbons
628(1)
22.10 Alcohols and Ethers
629(3)
22.11 Aldehydes and Ketones
632(2)
22.12 Carboxylic Acids and Esters
634(2)
22.13 Amines and Amides
636(2)
22.14 Summary of the Organic Compounds of Carbon, Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Nitrogen
638(1)
22.15 Addition Polymers
639(2)
22.16 Condensation Polymers
641(12)
23 BIOCHEMISTRY 653
23.1 Amino Acids and Proteins
654(6)
23.2 Enzymes
660(1)
23.3 Carbohydrates
661(5)
23.4 Lipids
666(4)
23.5 Nucleic Acids
670
APPENDIX I: CHEMICAL CALCULATIONS A-1
Part A The Hand Calculator
A-1
Part B Arithmetic and Algebra
A-6
Part C Logarithms
A-9
Part D Estimating Calculation Results
A-9
Answers to Practice Problems in Appendix I
A-10
APPENDIX II: THE SI SYSTEM OF UNITS A-11
APPENDIX III: ACTIVE LEARNING WORKBOOK SAMPLE A-13
GLOSSARY G-1
INDEX I-1


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