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Jazz : The First 100 Years,9780534628048

Jazz : The First 100 Years

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780534628048

ISBN10:
0534628044
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/2/2005
Publisher(s):
Cengage Learning
List Price: $168.66

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Summary

Explore the development of jazz music with JAZZ: THE FIRST 100 YEARS with accompanying audio CD! From its nineteenth-century roots in blues and ragtime, through swing and bebop, to fusion and contemporary jazz styles, this music text gives you a true feel for the vibrant, ever-changing sound of jazz. Learning is made easy with The Audio Jazz Primer CD that allows you to hear the key terms, basic music concepts, and jazz instruments discussed in the book. Key terms, topics for discussion, and the jazz basics appendix help you master difficult concepts.

Table of Contents

Listening Guide CD Tracks
Prefacep. xix
About the Authorsp. xxvi
Rootsp. 2
African American Music in the Nineteenth Centuryp. 4
Sources of Musical Diversityp. 4
The Preservation of African Traditionsp. 4
European Music in the Nineteenth Centuryp. 8
Instrumentation, Form, and Harmonyp. 8
Written Versus Head Arrangementsp. 10
Early African American Musicp. 10
The Character of Early African American Musicp. 11
Christianity, the Ring Shout, Spirituals, and Work Songsp. 12
Blue Notes and Syncopationp. 14
The Blues Scalep. 16
Minstrelsyp. 17
Ragtimep. 21
Scott Joplinp. 23
Piano Rollsp. 25
James Scottp. 25
Joseph Lambp. 26
Artie Matthewsp. 26
Ragtime's Relationship to Jazzp. 26
The Bluesp. 28
Pioneers of the Delta Bluesp. 29
Ma Raineyp. 31
W. C. Handyp. 31
Blues Formp. 33
Bessie Smithp. 34
Characteristics of Early Jazz Singingp. 35
Boogie-woogie and Other Forms of the Bluesp. 36
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 37
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 37
Key Termsp. 37
Early Jazzp. 38
The Shift from Ragtime to Jazzp. 39
New Orleansp. 42
How Did Jazz Arise in New Orleans?p. 44
Buddy Boldenp. 45
The Evolution of the Jazz Bandp. 46
Early Jazz Performance Termsp. 47
Early Jazz Instruments and Their Playersp. 47
Cornetp. 47
Trombonep. 48
Clarinetp. 48
Bass/Tubap. 49
Guitar/Banjop. 49
Drumsp. 49
Pianop. 50
The Exodus from New Orleansp. 50
The Migration Northp. 52
The Advent of Jazz Recordingp. 53
The ODJB and the First Jazz Recordingp. 55
Sidney Bechetp. 59
King Oliver and the Creole Jazz Bandp. 60
The Evolution of Improvisationp. 64
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 65
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 65
Key Termsp. 65
Morton, Armstrong, and Beiderbeckep. 66
Jelly Roll Mortonp. 67
Jelly's Last Jamp. 69
Louis Armstrongp. 71
Armstrong's Classic Stylep. 72
Armstrong in Chicago and His Later Careerp. 73
Trombone Techniquep. 79
The Chicagoans and Bix Beiderbeckep. 79
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 85
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 85
Key Termsp. 85
1920s Jazz in New York and Europep. 86
Tin Pan Alleyp. 89
The Harlem Renaissancep. 90
Harlem Stride Pianop. 93
Eubie Blakep. 94
James P. Johnsonp. 95
Fats Wallerp. 96
Art Tatump. 97
Paul Whiteman and George Gershwinp. 101
Beginnings of the Big Bandsp. 102
Fletcher Hendersonp. 102
Duke Ellington's Early Careerp. 105
Bubber Miley and Tricky Sam Nantonp. 106
Jazz in Europep. 111
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 117
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 117
Key Termsp. 117
The Swing Erap. 118
Overview: A Decade of Swingp. 119
The Big Band in the Swing Erap. 122
Instrumentation, Technique, and Arrangementp. 122
Big-band Termsp. 123
The Changing Role of the Rhythm Sectionp. 127
Territory Bandsp. 128
The Original Blue Devilsp. 129
Kansas Cityp. 130
Mary Lou Williams and the Clouds of Joyp. 130
Count Basiep. 133
Jazz Performance Termsp. 137
Benny Goodman: King of Swingp. 138
Race Relations in Early Jazzp. 141
Ellington After the Cotton Clubp. 144
Building on the Bandp. 146
Changes for the Betterp. 146
The 1940s and Beyondp. 149
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 153
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 153
Key Termsp. 153
Swing-era Bands and Stylistsp. 154
Influential Big Bands of the Swing Erap. 155
Cab Callowayp. 156
Jimmie Luncefordp. 156
Chick Webbp. 157
The Casa Loma Orchestrap. 158
McKinney's Cotton Pickersp. 158
Tommy and Jimmy Dorseyp. 158
Glenn Millerp. 159
Artie Shawp. 159
World War II and the "All-girl" Bandsp. 160
Swing-era Stylistsp. 163
Benny Goodmanp. 164
Coleman Hawkinsp. 166
Lester Youngp. 170
Lester Young's Use of Formulas in "Shoe Shine Boy"p. 170
Roy Eldridgep. 174
Jack Teagardenp. 175
Earl Hinesp. 175
Teddy Wilsonp. 176
Jimmy Blantonp. 179
Jo Jonesp. 179
Gene Krupap. 179
Charlie Christianp. 180
Benny Carterp. 183
"All of Me": A Benny Carter Arrangementp. 184
Billie Holidayp. 184
Summary of the Features of Swingp. 188
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 189
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 189
Key Termsp. 189
The Bebop Erap. 190
Revolution Versus Evolutionp. 192
Characteristics of the Bebop Stylep. 194
A Contrafact: Dizzy Gillespie's "Groovin' High"p. 195
The Historical Origins of Bebopp. 197
The Early Forties: Jamming at Minton's and Monroe'sp. 197
Big Bands in the Early 1940sp. 198
The American Federation of Musicians Strike in 1942p. 199
Bebop Moves to Fifty-second Streetp. 199
The Architects of Bebopp. 200
Charlie Parkerp. 200
Charlie Parker's Use of Formulasp. 207
Dizzy Gillespiep. 209
Latin Jazzp. 210
Bud Powellp. 212
Thelonious Monkp. 213
Monk and Metric Displacementp. 215
Other Bebop Artistsp. 218
J. J. Johnsonp. 218
Fats Navarrop. 218
Dexter Gordonp. 218
Bop-style Big Bands of the Late 1940sp. 219
Woody Hermanp. 219
Swing Bands in the Bebop Erap. 220
Claude Thornhillp. 220
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 221
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 221
Key Termsp. 221
The 1950s and New Jazz Substylesp. 222
Jazz and the New Substylesp. 224
Technological Advances in the 1950sp. 225
Cool Stylistsp. 226
Miles Davis and Birth of the Coolp. 226
Gerry Mulligan and Chet Bakerp. 229
The Modern Jazz Quartetp. 230
Dave Brubeckp. 232
Stan Getzp. 234
Lennie Tristanop. 235
Jazz on the West Coastp. 236
Third-stream Musicp. 238
Piano Stylistsp. 239
Vocalistsp. 241
Ella Fitzgeraldp. 241
Other Jazz Singers of the 1950s: Sarah Vaughan and Joe Williamsp. 244
Cool Singing in the 1950s: The Big-band Legacyp. 244
Vocalese: Eddie Jefferson and Lambert, Hendricks, and Rossp. 245
Frank Sinatrap. 245
Hard Bop and Funky/Soul Jazzp. 246
Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengersp. 246
Horace Silverp. 249
Clifford Brown-Max Roach Quintetp. 250
Max Roach and Modern Drummingp. 251
Sonny Rollinsp. 253
Sonny Rollins and Improvisationp. 254
Charles Mingusp. 255
Miles Davis in the 1950sp. 258
What Is Modal Jazz?p. 261
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 265
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 265
Key Termsp. 265
The 1960s Avant-gardep. 266
Ornette Coleman and Free Jazzp. 268
Ornette Coleman's Chamber and Orchestral Compositionsp. 271
John Coltranep. 274
Overview of Coltrane's Careerp. 274
Early Yearsp. 275
Hard Bop with Miles Davisp. 276
Coltrane's Classic Quartetp. 278
Coltrane's Modal Compositionsp. 280
Coltrane and the Avant-gardep. 283
Eric Dolphyp. 284
Eric Dolphy and Booker Littlep. 285
Avant-garde Jazz and Black Activismp. 286
Voices of Discontentp. 286
Archie Sheppp. 288
Albert Aylerp. 289
Black Activism and the Avant-garde Todayp. 290
Cecil Taylorp. 291
Taylor's Unit Structuresp. 292
Sun Rap. 293
Chicago: AACM, the Art Ensemble of Chicago, and Anthony Braxtonp. 295
Black Artists Group and the World Saxophone Quartetp. 297
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 299
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 299
Key Termsp. 299
Mainstream Jazz in the 1960sp. 300
Miles Davis in the 1960sp. 301
Pianistsp. 304
Bill Evansp. 305
Herbie Hancockp. 311
Chick Coreap. 313
Keith Jarrett and ECM Recordsp. 314
ECM Recordsp. 316
Funky/Soul Jazzp. 316
Cannonball Adderleyp. 317
The Blues in Funky/Soul Jazzp. 318
Jimmy Smith and Jazz Organistsp. 318
Guitaristsp. 319
The Hard Bop Legacy in the 1960sp. 319
Blue Note Recordsp. 320
Lee Morgan and Freddie Hubbardp. 320
Wayne Shorterp. 321
Joe Hendersonp. 321
Big Bands in the 1960sp. 322
Other Blue Note Artistsp. 322
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 323
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 323
Key Termsp. 323
Jazz-Rock, Jazz-Funk Fusionp. 324
Synthesizersp. 326
The Appeal of Rock and Funkp. 328
The Fusion Music of Miles Davisp. 330
Miles Davis in the Early 1970sp. 332
Other Fusion Pioneersp. 334
CTI Recordsp. 335
Lifetimep. 336
Mahavishnu Orchestrap. 337
Herbie Hancock and Headhuntersp. 338
Herbie Hancock's Synthesizer Solo on "Chameleon"p. 340
Chick Corea and Return to Foreverp. 343
Weather Reportp. 348
Pat Methenyp. 351
Other Fusion Bands: The Brecker Brothers and Stepsp. 353
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 355
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 355
Key Termsp. 355
Jazz Since the 1980sp. 356
Classicism and the Jazz Repertory Movementp. 358
Complete Jazz-recording Reissuesp. 358
Jazz Pedagogyp. 360
Jazz Repertoryp. 360
Wynton Marsalisp. 362
The Blakey Alumnip. 366
Big Bandsp. 370
The Popular Connectionp. 373
Digital Technologyp. 373
Smooth Jazzp. 373
Acid Jazzp. 375
The Mass Market: Radio and the Internetp. 376
Neo-swingp. 376
The Avant-garde, Crossover, World Music, and Jazz to Comep. 377
Jazz and Feminismp. 377
Jazz Abroadp. 379
Crossover, Postmodernism, and World Musicp. 380
Directions for Crossover Jazzp. 387
The Future of Jazzp. 389
Questions and Topics for Discussionp. 391
Additional Listening Downloadsp. 391
Key Termsp. 391
Jazz Basicsp. 392
Notesp. 399
Glossaryp. 405
Selected Readingsp. 414
Selected Discographyp. 418
Selected Jazz DVDs and Videosp. 420
Indexp. 424
Audio Primer CD Tracks
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.


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