9780061768934

Jesus Wars : How Four Patriarchs, Three Queens, and Two Emperors Decided What Christians Would Believe for the Next 1,500 Years

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  • ISBN13:

    9780061768934

  • ISBN10:

    0061768936

  • Edition: Reprint
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 3/8/2011
  • Publisher: HarperOne

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Summary

The Fifth-Century Political Battles That Forever Changed the Church

In this fascinating account of the surprisingly violent fifth-century church, Philip Jenkins describes how political maneuvers by a handful of powerful characters shaped Christian doctrine. Were it not for these battles, today's church could be teaching something very different about the nature of Jesus, and the papacy as we know it would never have come into existence. "Jesus Wars" reveals the profound implications of what amounts to an accident of history: that one faction of Roman emperors and militia-wielding bishops defeated another.

Jesus Wars reveals how official, orthodox teaching about Jesus was the product of political maneuvers by a handful of key characters in the fifth century. Jenkins argues that were it not for these controversies, the papacy as we know it would never have come into existence and that today's church could be teaching some-thing very different about Jesus. It is only an accident of history that one group of Roman emperors and militia-wielding bishops defeated another faction.

Author Biography

Philip Jenkins has a joint appointment at Penn State University and Baylor University and is the author of many books, including The Lost History of Christianity. His work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New Republic, The Atlantic Monthly, The Washington Post, and The Boston Globe.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. v
Introduction: Who Do You Say That I Am?p. vii
Terms and Definitionsp. xvii
Mapsp. xx
The Heart of the Matterp. 1
God and Caesarp. 39
The War of Two Naturesp. 41
Four Horsemen: The Church's Patriarchsp. 75
Queens, Generals, and Emperorsp. 103
Councils of Chaosp. 129
Not the Mother of God?p. 131
The Death of Godp. 169
Chalcedonp. 199
A World to Losep. 227
How the Church Lost Half the Worldp. 229
What Was Savedp. 267
Appendix: The Main Figures in the Storyp. 279
Notesp. 289
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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Customer Reviews

Excellent. July 26, 2011
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I really like this book. It is about the history between years 300 to 600 after Christ. Rarely, you're going to hear about these moments of history in a church service or a bible study. It is spectacular to read about people that gave his life for the sake of Christ and for the sake of the future of the Church. This stuff is worth reading and thinking about. So do it! Great care was taken in packaging and shipping this book. I received the book in a very short time. I feel ecampus cares about the books and his clients.
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Jesus Wars : How Four Patriarchs, Three Queens, and Two Emperors Decided What Christians Would Believe for the Next 1,500 Years: 4 out of 5 stars based on 1 user reviews.

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