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Judaic Religion in the Second Temple Period : Belief and Practice from the Exile to Yavneh,9780415212502
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Judaic Religion in the Second Temple Period : Belief and Practice from the Exile to Yavneh

by
ISBN13:

9780415212502

ISBN10:
0415212502
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
9/20/2000
Publisher(s):
Routledge
List Price: $145.00

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Summary

The developments in Judaism which occurred during the Second Temple period (c. 550 BC to 100 AD) were of great importance for the nature of Jewish religion in later centuries, yet few studies have examined the era in full. Now, Lester L. Grabbe's lucid and accessible volume provides a much-needed encyclopedic study and holistic interpretation of the period. Topics examined include: views about God and the spirit world; the temple and priesthood; Scripture and synagogue; the main religious sects and revolutionary movements; eschatology and messianism; magic and predicting the future; religion in the Jewish diaspora; and convents and "Godfearers." With an extensive, up-to-date bibliography, plus numerous helpful cross-references, summaries and syntheses, this volume is essential reading for scholars and students of the history of Jewish religion.

Author Biography

Lester L. Grabbe is Professor of Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism at the University of Hull.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
List of abbreviations
xvi
Introduction
1(10)
Aims of this study
1(2)
Definitions
3(3)
Religion
3(2)
Judaic
5(1)
Second Temple period
5(1)
Apologia pro historia mea
6(3)
Some technical matters
9(2)
PART I Chronological survey 11(116)
Persian period (539--333 BCE)
13(24)
Major sources
13(16)
Books of Ezra and Nehemiah
13(2)
Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi
15(2)
Joel
17(1)
Jonah
17(1)
Isaiah 56--66
18(1)
Books of Chronicles
19(2)
Proverbs
21(1)
Job
22(1)
Esther
23(2)
Ruth
25(1)
Song of Songs
25(1)
The P Document
26(2)
Archaeology, papyri, and coins
28(1)
Synthesis
29(8)
Early Greek period (333-200 BCE)
37(22)
Major Sources
37(15)
Hecateus of Abdera
37(2)
Zenon papyri
39(1)
The story of the Tobiads
40(1)
Ethiopic Enoch (I Enoch) and the Book of Giants
41(1)
Qohelet (Ecclesiastes)
42(2)
Tobit
44(2)
The edicts of Antiochus III
46(2)
Demetrius the Chronographer
48(1)
The Septuagint translation of the Bible
49(1)
Ben Sira (Ecclesiasticus)
50(2)
Synthesis
52(7)
Later Greek period and Hasmoneans (200-63 BCE)
59(25)
Major sources
59(17)
1 and 2 Maccabees
59(1)
Daniel
60(2)
I Enoch 83-105
62(1)
Book of Jubilees
63(1)
Sibylline Oracles 3-5
64(1)
Judith
65(1)
1 Baruch
66(1)
Qumran scrolls
67(3)
Fragmentary Jewish Writers in Greek
70(3)
Pseudo-Hecateus
73(1)
Testament of Moses (Assumption of Moses)
74(1)
Letter of (Pseudo-) Aristeas
75(1)
Synthesis
76(8)
Under Roman rule (63 BCE-70 CE)
84(32)
Major sources
84(24)
Psalms of Solomon
84(2)
3 Maccabees
86(1)
Wisdom of Solomon
86(2)
Pseudo-Phocylides
88(1)
Philo of Alexandria
89(3)
Josephus
92(2)
Liber Antiquitatum Biblicarum (Pseudo-Philo)
94(1)
Adam and Eve literature
95(2)
Similitudes (Parables) of Enoch (1 Enoch 37-71)
97(1)
Sibylline Oracles
97(1)
Slavonic Enoch (2 Enoch)
98(1)
4 Maccabees
99(1)
Testament of Moses
100(1)
Testaments of Abraham
100(1)
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
101(3)
Testament of Job
104(1)
Joseph and Asenath
105(1)
Judean Desert manuscripts, inscriptions, and archaeology
106(2)
Synthesis
108(8)
Transition to rabbinic Judaism: Yavneh
116(11)
Major sources
116(4)
Rabbinic literature
116(1)
Apocalypses of Ezra, Baruch, Abraham, and John
117(3)
Sibylline Oracles
120(1)
The reconstruction at Yavneh
120(4)
Synthesis
124(3)
PART II Special topics 127(186)
Temple and priesthood
129(21)
Theological basis of the cult
129(3)
Temple and cult
132(12)
The physical temple
134(1)
The cultic personnel
135(2)
Financial support for the temple
137(1)
The cultic rituals
138(2)
Women and the cult
140(1)
The cultic year: sabbath and annual festivals
141(2)
Music and singing
143(1)
The high priest and ``the Sanhedrin''
144(3)
Synthesis
147(3)
Scripture, prayer, and synagogue
150(33)
Scribes and literacy
150(2)
Scriptures and canon
152(6)
Main texts
153(3)
Conclusions about canonization
156(2)
Development of the text
158(7)
Summary about textual developments
164(1)
Scriptural interpretation
165(5)
Conclusions about scriptural interpretation
169(1)
Prayer and the rise of the synagogue
170(5)
``Popular religion''
175(3)
Synthesis
178(5)
Sects and movements
183(27)
Beginnings of sectarianism
183(2)
Sadducees and Pharisees
185(14)
Josephus
187(5)
New Testament
192(2)
Rabbinic literature
194(2)
4QMMT and the Temple Scroll (11QT)
196(1)
Summary and conclusions
196(3)
Essenes
199(7)
Sources
200(1)
The question of Qumran
201(4)
Some tentative conclusions
205(1)
Other sects and groups
206(1)
Synthesis
206(4)
Concepts of the Deity and the spirit world
210(22)
Developing views about God
210(9)
Ancient Israel
212(3)
Innovations during the Second Temple period
215(1)
The question of monotheism
216(3)
The spirit world
219(6)
Main texts
220(4)
Summary on angelic beings
224(1)
The figure of Wisdom and the Logos
225(5)
Main texts
225(2)
Summary of the figure of Wisdom
227(1)
The Logos tradition
228(2)
Synthesis
230(2)
Prophecy, apocalypticism, the esoteric arts, and predicting the future
232(25)
Problems of definition
232(4)
Did prophecy cease in the Second Temple period?
236(5)
Main texts
237(2)
Conclusions
239(2)
The esoteric arts and their use
241(10)
Astrology
241(2)
Dreams
243(2)
Textual interpretation
245(1)
Chronography
246(2)
Magic, mysticism, and controlling the spirits
248(3)
Prophetic and charismatic individuals
251(3)
Synthesis
254(3)
Eschatologies and ideas of salvation
257(14)
Main texts
257(9)
Synthesis
266(5)
Personal eschatology: ideas about life after death
267(1)
Heavens and hells
268(1)
Cosmic eschatology: expectations about the end of the world
269(2)
Messiahs
271(21)
Main texts
271(11)
Hebrew Bible
271(2)
Ben Sira
273(1)
Qumran scrolls
273(3)
Psalms of Solomon
276(1)
Similitudes of Enoch (1 Enoch 37-71)
276(1)
Philo
276(2)
Josephus
278(1)
4 Ezra / 2 Baruch
279(1)
Sibylline Oracles
280(1)
New Testament
280(1)
Rabbinic literature
281(1)
The ``Son of Man''
282(1)
Sicarii, Zealots, and other ``revolutionary'' groups
283(5)
General comments
284(1)
The ``Fourth Philosophy'' and the Sicarii
285(2)
Zealots
287(1)
Synthesis
288(4)
Jews and Judaism in the Hellenistic world
292(21)
How they saw themselves
292(13)
Jewish identity and conversion
292(5)
Ideology of the land and the concept of exile
297(3)
Gender and sexuality
300(5)
How others saw them
305(5)
Philo-Judaism and anti-Judaism
305(3)
Religious tolerance
308(2)
Synthesis
310(3)
PART III Conclusion 313(22)
Judaism in the Second Temple period: a holistic perspective
315(20)
Bibliography 335(52)
Indexes 387(1)
Index of modern authors 387(9)
Index of names and subjects 396(11)
Index of citations 407


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