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Keen's Latin American Civilization : History and Society, 1492 to the Present

by
Edition:
9th
ISBN13:

9780813344089

ISBN10:
0813344085
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
12/29/2008
Publisher(s):
Perseus Books
List Price: $55.00

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Summary

Keen's Latin American Civilizationintroduces readers to the sweeping panorama of Latin American history through a classic collection of primary documents. More than 140 readings, organized chronologically and placed in context by insightful introductory notes and essays, provide vivid glimpses of life in Latin America from the Conquest to the colonial and republican eras to contemporary Latin America. In the ninth edition, editors Robert Buffington and Lila Caimari document dramatic recent changes in Latin America, including the resurgence of leftist governments in South and Central America, the feminization of politics from the grassroots to the presidency, the devastating effects of narco-trafficking and political corruption on law and order, and growing concerns about the environment.

Author Biography

Robert Buffington is associate professor of history at Bowling Green State University. His books include Criminal and Citizen in Modern Mexico, Reconstructing Criminality in Latin America (edited with Carlos Aguirre), and Mexico Today: An Encyclopedia of Contemporary History and Culture (with Don Coerver and Suzanne Pasztor). Lila Caimari is adjunct professor of history at the Universidad de San Andres (Buenos Aires). Her books include Perón y la Iglesia Catolica, Religion, Estado y Sociedad en la Argentina (1943-1955) and Apenas un delincuente: Crimen castigo y cultura en la Argentina moderna.

Table of Contents

Prefacep. xiii
Indian and Hispanic Origins
Ancient America on the Eve of Conquestp. 3
Aztec Warfarep. 4
The Halls of Moctezumap. 6
Aztec Industry and Commercep. 8
The Condition of the Aztec Peasantryp. 10
An Aztec Mother Advises Her Daughterp. 12
Mayan Industry, Commerce, and Agriculturep. 15
The Mayan Social Orderp. 16
Mayan Religious Lifep. 18
Mayan Origin Mythp. 21
How the Inca Formed a Nationp. 25
The Village Basis of Incan Societyp. 27
Two Views of the Incan Empirep. 28
War and Cannibalism Among the Brazilian Indiansp. 32
Hispanic Society on the Eve of the Conquestp. 37
The Catholic Sovereignsp. 38
The Spanish Inquisitionp. 39
The Spanish Characterp. 41
The Man Columbusp. 43
Columbus Sets the Stagep. 45
The Portrait of the Conquerorp. 46
Conquest and Colonization
Conquestp. 51
October 12, 1492p. 52
The Discovery of the Pacificp. 54
The Meeting of Cortes and Moctezumap. 56
Twilight over Tenochtitlanp. 59
Rendezvous at Cajamarcap. 61
How the New Laws Were Received in Perup. 63
The Man Who Would Be Kingp. 65
Advice to a Would-Be Conquerorp. 67
Lope de Aguirre: Disillusioned Warriorp. 69
Journey's Endp. 72
Colonizationp. 75
The Strange Sermon of Fr. Montesinosp. 76
The Laughter of Dr. Palacios Rubiosp. 78
Bartolome de las Casas: God's Angry Manp. 79
All Humankind Is Onep. 82
The Portuguese Colonizerp. 84
The Slave Huntersp. 85
Aimore: Word of Terrorp. 87
Indian Forced Labor in Guatemalap. 89
Debt Peonage in Perup. 91
Dialogue in Yucatanp. 92
Guaman Poma Assesses the Conquestp. 94
The Colonial Political Economy
The Colonial Economyp. 103
The Indian Agricultural Heritagep. 105
Spain's Contributions to New World Agriculturep. 108
The Potosi Minep. 110
The Colonial Factoryp. 112
On the Sea-Road to the Indiesp. 113
The Great Fair at Portobellop. 116
A Foreign View of the Spanish Commercial Systemp. 118
The Rise and Fall of Villa Ricap. 120
Colonial Political and Religious Institutionsp. 125
The Structure of Colonial Governmentp. 127
"I Have Seen Corruption Boil and Bubble..."p. 131
The Corregidor: Enemy of the Peoplep. 132
"These Laws Are Obeyed and Not Enforced"p. 135
City Government in the Spanish Indiesp. 138
The Sources of Catholic Powerp. 139
The Administration of Colonial Brazilp. 141
Local Government: The Capitao-Morp. 143
The Jesuit Indian Policyp. 145
Colonial Society and Culture
Colonial Societyp. 149
The Structure of Class and Castep. 151
The Colonial City: Mexico Cityp. 153
The Mestizo: Seed of Tomorrowp. 158
The Indian Townp. 160
The World of the Sugar Plantationp. 165
The Free Populationp. 171
The Social Consequences of Slaveryp. 178
Colonial Culturep. 181
The Colonial Universityp. 182
The Tenth Musep. 183
On the Foolishness of Menp. 188
Gaucho Entertainmentp. 190
Indians and the Environmentp. 194
Sexual and Racial Politicsp. 196
Late Colonial Developments
The Bourbon Reformsp. 203
The Bourbon Commercial Reformsp. 204
The Revival of Miningp. 206
The New Experimental Sciences and Catholic Educationp. 209
Colonial Industry in Declinep. 210
Political Reform: The Intendant Systemp. 212
The More Things Change...p. 214
Winds of Changep. 217
Colonial Journalism in Actionp. 218
A Colonial Freethinkerp. 220
A Plan for Democratic Educationp. 222
The Plan of Tupac Amarup. 226
A Heroine of the Tupac Amaru Revoltp. 228
A Charter of Libertyp. 230
Brazilian Slaves Resistp. 232
Independence and Its Aftermath
The Struggle for Independencep. 237
The Cleavage Withinp. 238
The Forging of a Rebelp. 241
Man of Destinyp. 244
The Army of the Andesp. 247
Hidalgo: Torchbearer of the Mexican Revolutionp. 254
The Reforms of Hidalgop. 255
The Plan of Igualap. 256
A Letter to Dom Pedrop. 261
Searching for a New Roadp. 265
The Fatal Legacyp. 266
In Defense of Spainp. 269
Bolivar's Ideal Republicp. 271
The Age of Violencep. 282
Facundo: Barbarian Caudillop. 286
Mexico City Under Santa Annap. 291
Dom Pedro II: A Political Portraitp. 299
Constructing the Nation-State
Real and Imagined Communitiesp. 307
Roads to the Futurep. 308
The Guano Boomp. 312
Flora Tristan: Pioneer Feminist and Socialistp. 319
Reform by Revolutionp. 320
A Mexican Radicalp. 327
Black Slavery Under the Empirep. 330
The Antislavery Impulsep. 332
On Racial Miscegenation in Brazilp. 341
Modernity and the Emergence of the Nation-Statep. 345
Political Stability and Economic Developmentp. 346
Buenos Aires: First Impressionsp. 350
A Different Model of Economic Development: A New Program for Chilep. 352
Porfirio Diaz Assesses His Legacyp. 354
Porfirio Diaz, Viceroy of Mexicop. 357
A Popular Perspective on Modernityp. 363
"The Old Order Changeth..."p. 372
"... Yielding Place to New"p. 374
Our Americap. 378
Consolidating the Nation-State
The Rise of Mass Politics and Culturep. 387
For Land and Libertyp. 389
The Indian Problemp. 390
Teaching and Telling Storiesp. 393
What Is APRA?p. 396
Cardenas Speaksp. 402
On the Protection of the Brazilian Workerp. 407
Peron Appeals to the Peoplep. 409
Eva Peron: On Women's Right to Votep. 411
Letter to President Peronp. 413
Of Man, Woman, and Timep. 415
Democracy, Dictatorship, and "Development"p. 419
The New Latifundiop. 420
Economic Dependencyp. 427
"History Will Absolve Me"p. 433
Advice for the Urban Guerrillap. 439
Prelude to Dictatorshipp. 441
The Death of Victor Jarap. 446
Open Letter to the Military Juntap. 448
Mothers of the Disappearedp. 455
The Church in the Nicaraguan Revolutionp. 457
Death of the "Mexican Economic Miracle"p. 462
Communique from Subcomandante Marcosp. 467
Challenges to the Nation-State
Globalization and Its Discontentsp. 475
Lula Speaks Outp. 477
Citizens Talk About the Policep. 480
Sex and Revolutionp. 486
Latin America's Left Turnp. 494
Women Take Chargep. 505
The New Populismp. 507
Challenging the Nation-Statep. 512
The Two Americasp. 515
The Vision of Bolivarp. 518
The United States as Modelp. 520
The Monroe Doctrinep. 521
The Two Americasp. 523
"On the Uniqueness of Latin American Spirit"p. 528
The White Man's Burdenp. 530
Corollary to the Monroe Doctrinep. 536
To Rooseveltp. 538
Mexico's President Looks Northp. 540
National Securityp. 542
Operation Guatemalap. 544
Dissent Within the Ranksp. 551
Covert Operationsp. 557
Glossary of Spanish, Portuguese, and Indian Termsp. 561
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.


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